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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 66.1.4
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.42 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.42. I have given a rough account of what are more like the dreams of madmen than the considered opinions of philosophers. For they are little less absurd than the outpourings of the poets, harmful as these have been owing to the mere charm of their style. The poets have represented the gods as inflamed by anger and maddened by lust, and have displayed to our gaze their wars and battles, their fights and wounds, their hatreds, enmities and quarrels, their births and deaths, their complaints and lamentations, the utter and unbridled licence of their passions, their adulteries and imprisonments, their unions with human beings and the birth of mortal progeny from an immortal parent.
2. Polybius, Histories, 6.56.6-6.56.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6.56.6.  But the quality in which the Roman commonwealth is most distinctly superior is in my opinion the nature of their religious convictions. 6.56.7.  I believe that it is the very thing which among other peoples is an object of reproach, I mean superstition, which maintains the cohesion of the Roman State. 6.56.8.  These matters are clothed in such pomp and introduced to such an extent into their public and private life that nothing could exceed it, a fact which will surprise many. 6.56.9.  My own opinion at least is that they have adopted this course for the sake of the common people. 6.56.10.  It is a course which perhaps would not have been necessary had it been possible to form a state composed of wise men 6.56.11.  but as every multitude is fickle, full of lawless desires, unreasoned passion, and violent anger, the multitude must be held in by invisible terrors and suchlike pageantry. 6.56.12.  For this reason I think, not that the ancients acted rashly and at haphazard in introducing among the people notions concerning the gods and beliefs in the terrors of hell, but that the moderns are most rash and foolish in banishing such beliefs.
3. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 3.352-3.356, 3.399-3.408, 6.310-6.313 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.352. Now Josephus was able to give shrewd conjectures about the interpretation of such dreams as have been ambiguously delivered by God. Moreover, he was not unacquainted with the prophecies contained in the sacred books, as being a priest himself, and of the posterity of priests: 3.353. and just then was he in an ecstasy; and setting before him the tremendous images of the dreams he had lately had, he put up a secret prayer to God 3.354. and said, “Since it pleaseth thee, who hast created the Jewish nation, to depress the same, and since all their good fortune is gone over to the Romans, and since thou hast made choice of this soul of mine to foretell what is to come to pass hereafter, I willingly give them my hands, and am content to live. And I protest openly that I do not go over to the Romans as a deserter of the Jews, but as a minister from thee.” 3.355. 4. When he had said this, he complied with Nicanor’s invitation. But when those Jews who had fled with him understood that he yielded to those that invited him to come up, they came about him in a body, and cried out 3.356. “Nay, indeed, now may the laws of our forefathers, which God ordained himself, well groan to purpose; that God we mean who hath created the souls of the Jews of such a temper, that they despise death. 3.399. 9. When Josephus heard him give those orders, he said that he had somewhat in his mind that he would willingly say to himself alone. When therefore they were all ordered to withdraw, excepting Titus and two of their friends, he said 3.401. Dost thou send me to Nero? For why? Are Nero’s successors till they come to thee still alive? Thou, O Vespasian, art Caesar and emperor, thou, and this thy son. 3.402. Bind me now still faster, and keep me for thyself, for thou, O Caesar, are not only lord over me, but over the land and the sea, and all mankind; and certainly I deserve to be kept in closer custody than I now am in, in order to be punished, if I rashly affirm anything of God.” 3.403. When he had said this, Vespasian at present did not believe him, but supposed that Josephus said this as a cunning trick, in order to his own preservation; 3.404. but in a little time he was convinced, and believed what he said to be true, God himself erecting his expectations, so as to think of obtaining the empire, and by other signs foreshowing his advancement. 3.405. He also found Josephus to have spoken truth on other occasions; for one of those friends that were present at that secret conference said to Josephus, “I cannot but wonder how thou couldst not foretell to the people of Jotapata that they should be taken, nor couldst foretell this captivity which hath happened to thyself, unless what thou now sayest be a vain thing, in order to avoid the rage that is risen against thyself.” 3.406. To which Josephus replied, “I did foretell to the people of Jotapata that they would be taken on the forty-seventh day, and that I should be caught alive by the Romans.” 3.407. Now when Vespasian had inquired of the captives privately about these predictions, he found them to be true, and then he began to believe those that concerned himself. 3.408. Yet did he not set Josephus at liberty from his bands, but bestowed on him suits of clothes, and other precious gifts; he treated him also in a very obliging manner, and continued so to do, Titus still joining his interest in the honors that were done him. 6.311. for the Jews, by demolishing the tower of Antonia, had made their temple foursquare, while at the same time they had it written in their sacred oracles, “That then should their city be taken, as well as their holy house, when once their temple should become foursquare.” 6.312. But now, what did most elevate them in undertaking this war, was an ambiguous oracle that was also found in their sacred writings, how, “about that time, one from their country should become governor of the habitable earth.” 6.313. The Jews took this prediction to belong to themselves in particular, and many of the wise men were thereby deceived in their determination. Now, this oracle certainly denoted the government of Vespasian, who was appointed emperor in Judea.
4. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 1.37-1.40 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.37. and this is justly, or rather necessarily done, because every one is not permitted of his own accord to be a writer, nor is there any disagreement in what is written; they being only prophets that have written the original and earliest accounts of things as they learned them of God himself by inspiration; and others have written what hath happened in their own times, and that in a very distinct manner also. 8. 1.38. For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and contradicting one another [as the Greeks have], but only twenty-two books, which contain the records of all the past times; which are justly believed to be divine; 1.39. and of them five belong to Moses, which contain his laws and the traditions of the origin of mankind till his death. This interval of time was little short of three thousand years;
5. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 4.5, 5.6-5.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Tacitus, Histories, 5.13 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.13.  Prodigies had indeed occurred, but to avert them either by victims or by vows is held unlawful by a people which, though prone to superstition, is opposed to all propitiatory rites. Contending hosts were seen meeting in the skies, arms flashed, and suddenly the temple was illumined with fire from the clouds. of a sudden the doors of the shrine opened and a superhuman voice cried: "The gods are departing": at the same moment the mighty stir of their going was heard. Few interpreted these omens as fearful; the majority firmly believed that their ancient priestly writings contained the prophecy that this was the very time when the East should grow strong and that men starting from Judea should possess the world. This mysterious prophecy had in reality pointed to Vespasian and Titus, but the common people, as is the way of human ambition, interpreted these great destinies in their own favour, and could not be turned to the truth even by adversity. We have heard that the total number of the besieged of every age and both sexes was six hundred thousand; there were arms for all who could use them, and the number ready to fight was larger than could have been anticipated from the total population. Both men and women showed the same determination; and if they were to be forced to change their home, they feared life more than death. Such was the city and people against which Titus Caesar now proceeded; since the nature of the ground did not allow him to assault or employ any sudden operations, he decided to use earthworks and mantlets; the legions were assigned to their several tasks, and there was a respite of fighting until they made ready every device for storming a town that the ancients had ever employed or modern ingenuity invented.
7. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 5.3-5.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
astrology Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
authority Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
control Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
divinatory and prophetic writings, interest in, in flavian rome Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
domitian Westwood, Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives (2023) 15
elites Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
epaphroditus Westwood, Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives (2023) 15
gallina alba portent Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
identity, augustan ideology Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
jewish writings, interest in, in flavian rome Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
jewish writings, oracular character of Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
josephus, and oracular character of jewish writings Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
josephus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
manipulation Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
narratives Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
non-elites Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
octavian/augustus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
omens Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
political power Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
prediction, divinatory Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
princeps Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
religion, foreign, in flavian ideology Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
religion Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
roman republic Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
rome Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
senate/senators' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
suetonius, on oracular character of judean writings Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
tacitus, on oracular character of judean writings Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
tacitus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
trajan Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137
vespasian, confirmed as emperor by judean religion and texts Ashbrook Harvey et al., A Most Reliable Witness: Essays in Honor of Ross Shepard Kraemer (2015) 105
vespasian Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 137