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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 62.18.3


nan There was no curse that the populace did not invoke upon Nero, though they did not mention his name, but simply cursed in general terms those who had set the city on fire. And they were disturbed above all by recalling the oracle which once in the time of Tiberius had been on everybody's lips. It ran thus: "Thrice three hundred years having run their course of fulfilment, Rome by the strife of her people shall perish.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

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1. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.12.2-10.12.3, 10.12.6-10.12.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.12.2. Herophile was younger than she was, but nevertheless she too was clearly born before the Trojan war, as she foretold in her oracles that Helen would be brought up in Sparta to be the ruin of Asia and of Europe, and that for her sake the Greeks would capture Troy . The Delians remember also a hymn this woman composed to Apollo. In her poem she calls herself not only Herophile but also Artemis, and the wedded wife of Apollo, saying too sometimes that she is his sister, and sometimes that she is his daughter. 10.12.3. These statements she made in her poetry when in a frenzy and possessed by the god. Elsewhere in her oracles she states that her mother was an immortal, one of the nymphs of Ida, while her father was a human. These are the verses:— I am by birth half mortal, half divine; An immortal nymph was my mother, my father an eater of corn; On my mother's side of Idaean birth, but my fatherland was red Marpessus, sacred to the Mother, and the river Aidoneus. 10.12.6. However, death came upon her in the Troad, and her tomb is in the grove of the Sminthian with these elegiac verses inscribed upon the tomb-stone:— Here I am, the plain-speaking Sibyl of Phoebus, Hidden beneath this stone tomb. A maiden once gifted with voice, but now for ever voiceless, By hard fate doomed to this fetter. But I am buried near the nymphs and this Hermes, Enjoying in the world below a part of the kingdom I had then. The Hermes stands by the side of the tomb, a square-shaped figure of stone. On the left is water running down into a well, and the images of the nymphs. 10.12.7. The Erythraeans, who are more eager than any other Greeks to lay claim to Herophile, adduce as evidence a mountain called Mount Corycus with a cave in it, saying that Herophile was born in it, and that she was a daughter of Theodorus, a shepherd of the district, and of a nymph. They add that the surname Idaean was given to the nymph simply because the men of those days called idai places that were thickly wooded. The verse about Marpessus and the river Aidoneus is cut out of the oracles by the Erythraeans.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
asia minor Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
cassius dio Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
delos Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
delphi Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
erythrae Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
helen Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
heraclitus Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
hexameter Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
lactantius Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
oracles, relationship with poetry Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
oracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
plutarch Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
prophecy' König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
prophecy Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sibyl, erythraean sibyl Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sibyl Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sibylline oracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sparta Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
tiberius Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
varro Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188