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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 57.24.6


nan There were other events, also, at this time worthy of a place in history. The people of Cyzicus were once more deprived of their freedom, because they had imprisoned some Romans and because they had not completed the shrine to Augustus which they had begun to build.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Suetonius, Tiberius, 37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Tacitus, Annals, 1.73.3, 4.1.1, 4.17.1, 4.34-4.36, 4.36.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.1.1.  The consulate of Gaius Asinius and Gaius Antistius was to Tiberius the ninth year of public order and of domestic felicity (for he counted the death of Germanicus among his blessings), when suddenly fortune disturbed the peace and he became either a tyrant himself or the source of power to the tyrannous. The starting-point and the cause were to be found in Aelius Sejanus, prefect of the praetorian cohorts. of his influence I spoke above: now I shall unfold his origin, his character, and the crime by which he strove to seize on empire. Born at Vulsinii to the Roman knight Seius Strabo, he became in early youth a follower of Gaius Caesar, grandson of the deified Augustus; not without a rumour that he had disposed of his virtue at a price to Apicius, a rich man and a prodigal. Before long, by his multifarious arts, he bound Tiberius fast: so much so that a man inscrutable to others became to Sejanus alone unguarded and unreserved; and the less by subtlety (in fact, he was beaten in the end by the selfsame arts) than by the anger of Heaven against that Roman realm for whose equal damnation he flourished and fell. He was a man hardy by constitution, fearless by temperament; skilled to conceal himself and to incriminate his neighbour; cringing at once and insolent; orderly and modest to outward view, at heart possessed by a towering ambition, which impelled him at whiles to lavishness and luxury, but oftener to industry and vigilance — qualities not less noxious when assumed for the winning of a throne. 4.17.1.  In the consulate of Cornelius Cethegus and Visellius Varro, the pontiffs and — after their example — the other priests, while offering the vows for the life of the emperor, went further and commended Nero and Drusus to the same divinities, not so much from affection for the princes as in that spirit of sycophancy, of which the absence or the excess is, in a corrupt society, equally hazardous. For Tiberius, never indulgent to the family of Germanicus, was now stung beyond endurance to find a pair of striplings placed on a level with his own declining years. He summoned the pontiffs, and asked if they had made this concession to the entreaties — or should he say the threats? — of Agrippina. The pontiffs, in spite of their denial, received only a slight reprimand (for a large number were either relatives of his own or prominent figures in the state); but in the senate, he gave warning that for the future no one was to excite to arrogance the impressionable minds of the youths by such precocious distinctions. The truth was that Sejanus was pressing him hard: — "The state," so ran his indictment, "was split into two halves, as if by civil war. There were men who proclaimed themselves of Agrippina's party: unless a stand was taken, there would be more; and the only cure for the growing disunion was to strike down one or two of the most active malcontents. 4.34.  The consulate of Cornelius Cossus and Asinius Agrippa opened with the prosecution of Cremutius Cordus upon the novel and till then unheard-of charge of publishing a history, eulogizing Brutus, and styling Cassius the last of the Romans. The accusers were Satrius Secundus and Pinarius Natta, clients of Sejanus. That circumstance sealed the defendant's fate — that and the lowering brows of the Caesar, as he bent his attention to the defence; which Cremutius, resolved to take his leave of life, began as follows:— "Conscript Fathers, my words are brought to judgement — so guiltless am I of deeds! Nor are they even words against the sole persons embraced by the law of treason, the sovereign or the parent of the sovereign: I am said to have praised Brutus and Cassius, whose acts so many pens have recorded, whom not one has mentioned save with honour. Livy, with a fame for eloquence and candour second to none, lavished such eulogies on Pompey that Augustus styled him 'the Pompeian': yet it was without prejudice to their friendship. Scipio, Afranius, this very Cassius, this Brutus — not once does he describe them by the now fashionable titles of brigand and parricide, but time and again in such terms as he might apply to any distinguished patriots. The works of Asinius Pollio transmit their character in noble colours; Messalla Corvinus gloried to have served under Cassius: and Pollio and Corvinus lived and died in the fulness of wealth and honour! When Cicero's book praised Cato to the skies, what did it elicit from the dictator Caesar but a written oration as though at the bar of public opinion? The letters of Antony, the speeches of Brutus, contain invectives against Augustus, false undoubtedly yet bitter in the extreme; the poems — still read — of Bibaculus and Catullus are packed with scurrilities upon the Caesars: yet even the deified Julius, the divine Augustus himself, tolerated them and left them in peace; and I hesitate whether to ascribe their action to forbearance or to wisdom. For things contemned are soon things forgotten: anger is read as recognition. 4.35.  "I leave untouched the Greeks; with them not liberty only but licence itself went unchastised, or, if a man retaliated, he avenged words by words. But what above all else was absolutely free and immune from censure was the expression of an opinion on those whom death had removed beyond the range of rancour or of partiality. Are Brutus and Cassius under arms on the plains of Philippi, and I upon the platform, firing the nation to civil war? Or is it the case that, seventy years since their taking-off, as they are known by their effigies which the conqueror himself did not abolish, so a portion of their memory is enshrined likewise in history? — To every man posterity renders his wage of honour; nor will there lack, if my condemnation is at hand, those who shall remember, not Brutus and Cassius alone, but me also!" He then left the senate, and closed his life by self-starvation. The Fathers ordered his books to be burned by the aediles; but copies remained, hidden and afterwards published: a fact which moves us the more to deride the folly of those who believe that by an act of despotism in the present there can be extinguished also the memory of a succeeding age. On the contrary, genius chastised grows in authority; nor have alien kings or the imitators of their cruelty effected more than to crown themselves with ignominy and their victims with renown. 4.36.  For the rest, the year was so continuous a chain of impeachments that in the days of the Latin Festival, when Drusus, as urban prefect, mounted the tribunal to inaugurate his office, he was approached by Calpurnius Salvianus with a suit against Sextus Marius: an action which drew a public reprimand from the Caesar and occasioned the banishment of Salvianus. The community of Cyzicus were charged with neglecting the cult of the deified Augustus; allegations were added of violence to Roman citizens; and they forfeited the freedom earned during the Mithridatic War, when the town was invested and they beat off the king as much by their own firmness as by the protection of Lucullus. On the other hand, Fonteius Capito, who had administered Asia as proconsul, was acquitted upon proof that the accusations against him were the invention of Vibius Serenus. The reverse, however, did no harm to Serenus, who was rendered doubly secure by the public hatred. For the informer whose weapon never rested became quasi-sacrosanct: it was on the insignificant and unknown that punishments descended.
3. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 57.24.7 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

57.24.7.  A man who had sold the emperor's statue along with his house was brought to trial for doing this, and would certainly have been put to death by Tiberius, had not the consul called upon the emperor himself to give his vote first; for in this way Tiberius, being ashamed to appear to be favouring himself, cast his vote for acquittal.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adulatio Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
agrippina the elder Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
anemurion Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
antiochos iv of commagene Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
antonia tryphaina, regent in pontos Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
archelaos ii, client-king in cilicia Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
archontes Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
armenia/armenians, orontid and artaxiad dynasty Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
arsakes, parthian prince and armenian king Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
artabanos iii, parthian king Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
augustus, worship of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
bithynia/bithynians, cities Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
caligula, emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
cilicia/cilicians, client-kings in the julio-claudian period Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
cities, free Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
cities Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
cremutius cordus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
criminal law and procedure Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
ctesiphon Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
derbe Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
drusus (son of germanicus) Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
galatia, roman province Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
helios, sun god Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
iberia/iberians, geographical area, kingdom, and people Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
imperial cult Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
judges Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
kaisareia (sardeis) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
kelenderis Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
king Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
korykos Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
kotys, thracian king Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
kyzikos Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
livia, temples dedicated to Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
livia Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
lycaonia/lycaonians, antiocheiane Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
memory, cultic Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
miletus/milesians, caligula demands dedication of the didymaion to him Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
mithridates, brother of the iberian king pharasmanes, king of armenia Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
mithridates, king of iberia Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
neokaisareia (philadelpheia) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
neolithic/chalcolithic age (ca. Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
nero (son of germanicus) Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
oath Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
oroandeis, people Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
pappa (tiberiopolitai pappenoi orondeis) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
penalties Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
philadelpheia in lydia Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
phraates iii, parthian king Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
polemon ii of pontos Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
pontos, kingdom of, pythodoris and polemon ii Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
pythodoris, wife of polemon and dynast in pontos Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
religion Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
rhoimetalkes, son of antonia tryphaina Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
rome/romans, provincialization and parthian wars in the imperial period Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
sacrifice Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
saevitia' Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
sebaste in pontos (kasbeira-diospolisneokaisareaia, now niksar?) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
senate, roman Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
senate Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
spain Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
the time of tiberius Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
throne Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
tiberiopolis (tiberiopolitai pappenoi orondeis, pappa) Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
tiberius, and divus augustus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
tiberius, senates relationship with Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
tiberius, temples of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
tiberius, worshipful treatment of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 184
tiberius Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
tiberius emperor Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
vestal virgin Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274
vitellius, governor of syria Marek, In the Land of a Thousand Gods: A History of Asia Minor in the Ancient World (2019) 329
zeus Czajkowski et al., Law in the Roman Provinces (2020) 274