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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.9.6


nan He made the journey as a private citizen, though he exercised his authority by compelling the Parians to sell him the statue of Vesta, in order that it might be placed in the temple of Concord; and when he reached Rhodes, he refrained from haughty conduct in both word and deed.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Philippicae, 2.109, 13.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Livy, History, 1.26.13-1.26.14, 39.5.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Ovid, Fasti, 6.267 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.267. Vesta’s identified with Earth: in them both’s unsleeping fire:
5. Strabo, Geography, 14.2.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

14.2.19. The city of the Coans was in ancient times called Astypalaea; and its people lived on another site, which was likewise on the sea. And then, on account of a sedition, they changed their abode to the present city, near Scandarium, and changed the name to Cos, the same as that of the island. Now the city is not large, but it is the most beautifully settled of all, and is most pleasing to behold as one sails from the high sea to its shore. The size of the island is about five hundred and fifty stadia. It is everywhere well supplied with fruits, but like Chios and Lesbos it is best in respect to its wine. Towards the south it has a promontory, Laceter, whence the distance to Nisyros is sixty stadia (but near Laceter there is a place called Halisarna), and on the west it has Drecanum and a village called Stomalimne. Now Drecanum is about two hundred stadia distant from the city, but Laceter adds thirty-five stadia to the length of the voyage. In the suburb is the Asclepieium, a sanctuary exceedingly famous and full of numerous votive offerings, among which is the Antigonus of Apelles. And Aphrodite Anadyomene used to be there, but it is now dedicated to the deified Caesar in Rome, Augustus thus having dedicated to his father the female founder of his family. It is said that the Coans got a remission of one hundred talents of the appointed tribute in return for the painting. And it is said that the dietetics practised by Hippocrates were derived mostly from the cures recorded on the votive tablets there. He, then, is one of the famous men from Cos; and so is Simus the physician; as also Philetas, at the same time poet and critic; and, in my time, Nicias, who also reigned as tyrant over the Coans; and Ariston, the pupil and heir of the Peripatetic; and Theomnestus, a renowned harper, who was a political opponent of Nicias, was a native of the island.
6. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.171-2.175 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.171. and hid himself, refusing to bring forth 2.172. His word of guile, and name what wretch should die. 2.173. At last, reluctant, and all loudly urged 2.174. By false Ulysses, he fulfils their plot 2.175. and, lifting up his voice oracular
7. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.108 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Juvenal, Satires, 4.20, 5.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59, 10.96 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59, 10.96 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.6, 34.48, 34.62, 34.80, 35.4, 35.26, 35.66, 35.131, 35.144, 36.25, 37.82 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 61.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Suetonius, Augustus, 16.2, 70.1-70.2, 71.1, 72.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Suetonius, Caligula, 57.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Iulius, 79.1, 80.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Suetonius, Nero, 45 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Suetonius, Tiberius, 44.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Tacitus, Annals, 1.74, 12.49, 15.34 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.74.  Before long, Granius Marcellus, praetor of Bithynia, found himself accused of treason by his own quaestor, Caepio Crispinus, with Hispo Romanus to back the charge. Caepio was the pioneer in a walk of life which the miseries of the age and effronteries of men soon rendered popular. Indigent, unknown, unresting, first creeping, with his private reports, into the confidence of his pitiless sovereign, then a terror to the noblest, he acquired the favour of one man, the hatred of all, and set an example, the followers of which passed from beggary to wealth, from being despised to being feared, and crowned at last the ruin of others by their own. He alleged that Marcellus had retailed sinister anecdotes about Tiberius: a damning indictment, when the accuser selected the foulest qualities of the imperial character, and attributed their mention to the accused. For, as the facts were true, they were also believed to have been related! Hispo added that Marcellus' own statue was placed on higher ground than those of the Caesars, while in another the head of Augustus had been struck off to make room for the portrait of Tiberius. This incensed the emperor to such a degree that, breaking through his taciturnity, he exclaimed that, in this case, he too would vote, openly and under oath, — the object being to impose a similar obligation on the rest. There remained even yet some traces of dying liberty. Accordingly Gnaeus Piso inquired: "In what order will you register your opinion, Caesar? If first, I shall have something to follow: if last of all, I fear I may inadvertently find myself on the other side." The words went home; and with a meekness that showed how profoundly he rued his unwary outburst, he voted for the acquittal of the defendant on the counts of treason. The charge of peculation went before the appropriate commission. 12.49.  The procurator of Cappadocia was Julius Paelignus, a person made doubly contemptible by hebetude of mind and grotesqueness of body, yet on terms of the greatest intimacy with Claudius during the years of retirement when he amused his sluggish leisure with the society of buffoons. The Paelignus had mustered the provincial militia, with the avowed intention of recovering Armenia; but, while he was plundering our subjects in preference to the enemy, the secession of his troops left him defenceless against the barbarian incursions, and he made his way to Radamistus, by whose liberality he was so overpowered that he voluntarily advised him to assume the kingly emblem, and assisted at its assumption in the quality of sponsor and satellite. Ugly reports of the incident spread; and, to make it clear that not all Romans were to be judged by the standard of Paelignus, the legate Helvidius Priscus was sent with a legion to deal with the disturbed situation as the circumstances might require. Accordingly, after crossing Mount Taurus in haste, he had settled more points by moderation than by force, when he was ordered back to Syria, lest he should give occasion for a Parthian war. 15.34.  There an incident took place, sinister in the eyes of many, providential and a mark of divine favour in those of the sovereign; for, after the audience had left, the theatre, now empty, collapsed without injury to anyone. Therefore, celebrating in a set of verses his gratitude to Heaven, Nero — now bent on crossing the Adriatic — came to rest for the moment at Beneventum; where a largely attended gladiatorial spectacle was being exhibited by Vatinius. Vatinius ranked among the foulest prodigies of that court; the product of a shoemaker's shop, endowed with a misshapen body and a scurrile wit, he had been adopted at the outset as a target for buffoonery; then, by calumniating every man of decency, he acquired a power which made him in influence, in wealth, and in capacity for harm, pre-eminent even among villains.
19. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 44.9.2, 55.8.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

44.9.2.  When he kept refusing the title and rebuking in a way those who thus accosted him, yet did nothing by which it would be thought that he was really displeased at it, they secretly adorned his statue, which stood on the rostra, with a diadem. 55.8.2.  After assigning to himself the duty of repairing the temple of Concord, in order that he might inscribe upon it his own name and that of Drusus, he celebrated his triumph, and in company with his mother dedicated the precinct called the precinct of Livia. He gave a banquet to the senate on the Capitol, and she gave one on her own account to the women somewhere or other.
20. Festus Sextus Pompeius, De Verborum Significatione, None (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Lucian, Hermotimus, Or Sects, 86 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

86. Her . You are quite right. And now I will be off to metamorphose myself. When we next meet, there will be no long, shaggy beard, no artificial composure; I shall be natural, as a gentleman should. I may go as far as a fashionable coat, by way of publishing my renunciation of nonsense. I only wish there were an emetic that would purge out every doctrine they have instilled into me; I assure you, if I could reverse Chrysippus's plan with the hellebore, and drink forgetfulness, not of the world but of Stoicism, I would not think twice about it. Well, Lycinus, I owe you a debt indeed; I was being swept along in a rough turbid torrent, unresisting, drifting with the stream; when lo, you stood there and fished me out, a true deus ex machina. I have good enough reason, I think, to shave my head like the people who get clear off from a wreck; for I am to make votive offerings today for the dispersion of that thick cloud which was over my eyes. Henceforth, if I meet a philosopher on my walks (and it will not be with my will), I shall turn aside and avoid him as I would a mad dog.
22. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.25.9, 8.46.1-8.46.5, 9.27.3, 10.7.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.25.9. but Agamemnon's statue is the only one of the eight to have his name inscribed upon it; the writing is from right to left. The figure with the cock emblazoned on the shield is Idomeneus the descendant of Minos. The story goes that Idomeneus was descended from the Sun, the father of Pasiphae, and that the cock is sacred to the Sun and proclaims when he is about to rise. 8.46.1. The ancient image of Athena Alea, and with it the tusks of the Calydonian boar, were carried away by the Roman emperor Augustus after his defeat of Antonius and his allies, among whom were all the Arcadians except the Mantineans. 8.46.2. It is clear that Augustus was not the first to carry away from the vanquished votive offerings and images of gods, but was only following an old precedent. For when Troy was taken and the Greeks were dividing up the spoils, Sthenelus the son of Capaneus was given the wooden image of Zeus Herceius (of the Courtyard); and many years later, when Dorians were migrating to Sicily, Antiphemus the founder of Gela, after the sack of Omphace, a town of the Sicanians, removed to Gela an image made by Daedalus. 8.46.3. Xerxes, too, the son of Dareius, the king of Persia, apart from the spoil he carried away from the city of Athens, took besides, as we know, from Brauron the image of Brauronian Artemis, and furthermore, accusing the Milesians of cowardice in a naval engagement against the Athenians in Greek waters, carried away from them the bronze Apollo at Branchidae . This it was to be the lot of Seleucus afterwards to restore to the Milesians, but the Argives down to the present still retain the images they took from Tiryns ; one, a wooden image, is by the Hera, the other is kept in the sanctuary of Lycian Apollo. 8.46.4. Again, the people of Cyzicus, compelling the people of Proconnesus by war to live at Cyzicus, took away from Proconnesus an image of Mother Dindymene. The image is of gold, and its face is made of hippopotamus teeth instead of ivory. So the emperor Augustus only followed a custom in vogue among the Greeks and barbarians from of old. The image of Athena Alea at Rome is as you enter the Forum made by Augustus. 8.46.5. Here then it has been set up, made throughout of ivory, the work of Endoeus. Those in charge of the curiosities say that one of the boar's tusks has broken off; the remaining one is kept in the gardens of the emperor, in a sanctuary of Dionysus, and is about half a fathom long. 9.27.3. Sappho of Lesbos wrote many poems about Love, but they are not consistent. Later on Lysippus made a bronze Love for the Thespians, and previously Praxiteles one of Pentelic marble. The story of Phryne and the trick she played on Praxiteles I have related in another place. See Paus. 1.20.1 . The first to remove the image of Love, it is said, was Gaius the Roman Emperor; Claudius, they say, sent it back to Thespiae, but Nero carried it away a second time. 10.7.1. It seems that from the beginning the sanctuary at Delphi has been plotted against by a vast number of men. Attacks were made against it by this Euboean pirate, and years afterwards by the Phlegyan nation; furthermore by Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, by a portion of the army of Xerxes, by the Phocian chieftains, whose attacks on the wealth of the god were the longest and fiercest, and by the Gallic invaders. It was fated too that Delphi was to suffer from the universal irreverence of Nero, who robbed Apollo of five hundred bronze statues, some of gods, some of men.
23. Epigraphy, Stratonikeia, 511

24. Manilius, Astronomica, 1.7-1.10, 1.247-1.254, 2.60-2.83, 3.48-3.55



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aesculapius, temple at antium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
aesculapius, temple on cos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
alexander the great, his breast plate Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
antium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
antony, marc, proscribes verres Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
antony, marc Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
apelles, portrait of antigonus gonatas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
apelles, the birth of venus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
apelles, the lineum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
aphrodite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
arcesilaus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
arrephoria Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
athena alea at tegea Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
attitudes, roman Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
auctoritas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
augustus, conquest of egypt Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
augustus, fond of corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
augustus, moderation of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
augustus, private collection of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
augustus, takes the treasures of the ptolemies Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
augustus, villa on capri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
augustus Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50, 105
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
baton, his apollo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
baton, his juno Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
berger, ernst Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
boeotia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
britain Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
caligula, appropriates alexander the greats breastplate Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
collectors, and eroticism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
conquers britain, his infirmities Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
cos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50, 70
dacia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
euphranor, latona, apollo, and artemis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
farnese cup Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
felicitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
flower, h. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
fossils Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
germanicus caesar Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
gisler-huwiler, m. Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
heius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
hestia kourotrophos Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
house, access to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
hölscher, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
identity, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
ilium Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
impietas against, veneration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
impietas against Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
jerusalem, temple of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 145
jerusalem Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
jews Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
julius caesar, c., private tastes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
julius caesar, gaius Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
lagina Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
lares Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
lucretius gallus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
luxury, attitudes towards Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
luxury Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
mamurra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
martial, on snobbery Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
mummius achaicus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
museum, the capitoline museum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
museum, the vatican museum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
myron Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
neptune Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
nero, fondness for corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
niceratus, his aesculapius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
niceratus, his hygeia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
nicias, his liber pater Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
nicias Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
objects, and power Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
objects, their public versus private context Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
painting, triumphal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 145
parrhasius, his atalanta and meleager Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
pergamum Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
petronius, and trimalchio as collector Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
piston, his mars Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
piston, his mercury Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
pliny the elder, on connoisseurship Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
polyclitus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50, 68
polycrates of samos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
praxiergidai Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
praxiteles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
proplasmata Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
protogenes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
ptolemids Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
publicani Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
res gestae' Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 120
rome, arch of titus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 145
rome, concordia, temple of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
rome, servilius, gardens of Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, and euphranor Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, and livia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, and tiberius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, cosmic significance of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia, neptune and venus absent Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
sallust, on luxury Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
sarian, h. Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
sempronius gracchus, ti. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
semproniusgracchus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
sthennis, works in temple of concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
tacitus, on luxury Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
theodorus, his cassandra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268
tiberius, and erotica Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
tiberius, and lysippus apoxyomenos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
tiberius, his private collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
tiberius, his self-imposed exile on rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
tiberius, villa on capri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
tiberius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
tiberius (emperor) Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 368
timomachus of byzantium, his ajax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
timomachus of byzantium, his medea Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 70
titus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 145
trimalchio, on corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 68
tullius cicero, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
verres, c., looting of sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50
vesta, parian statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 50, 268
viewers, elite versus non-elite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
viewers, shared values of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 105
virtus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 145
zeuxis, his marsyas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 268