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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.22.5


nan And since the noblest families did not show themselves inclined to give their daughters to be priestesses of Vesta, a law was passed that the daughters of freedmen might likewise become priestesses. Many vied for the honour, and so they drew lots in the senate in the presence of their fathers, so far as these were knights however, no priestess was appointed from this class.


nanAnd since the noblest families did not show themselves inclined to give their daughters to be priestesses of Vesta, a law was passed that the daughters of freedmen might likewise become priestesses. Many vied for the honour, and so they drew lots in the senate in the presence of their fathers, so far as these were knights however, no priestess was appointed from this class.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Tacitus, Annals, 4.16.4, 16.30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.30.  In the meantime, Ostorius Sabinus, the accuser of Soranus, entered and began his speech, dwelling upon the friendship of the defendant with Rubellius Plautus, and upon his governorship of Asia, "which he had treated rather as a position conveniently adapted to his own distinction than with a view to the public interest; as he had shown by fostering the seditious tendencies of the cities." This was an old story: what was new, and used for implicating the daughter of Soranus in her father's danger, was a charge that she had distributed money to magicians. That had, in fact, happened, owing to the filial piety of Servilia (for so the girl was called), who, influenced by love for her father and at the same time by the imprudence of her years, had consulted them, though on no other point than the safety of her family and the chances that Nero would prove placable and the trial by the senate produce no tragic result. She was, therefore, summoned before the senate and at opposite ends of the consular tribunal stood an aged parent and, facing him, his daughter, who had not yet reached her twentieth year; condemned to widowhood and loneliness by the recent exile of her husband Annius Pollio, and not even lifting her eyes to her father, whose dangers she seemed to have aggravated.
2. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.3.4, 60.5.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.3.4.  His grandmother he immediately saluted as Augusta, and appointed her to be priestess of Augustus, granting to her at once all the privileges of the Vestal Virgins. To his sisters he assigned these privileges of the Vestal Virgins, also that of witnessing the games in the Circus with him from the imperial seats, and the right to have uttered in their behalf, also, not only the prayers annually offered by the magistrates and priests for his welfare and that of the State, but also the oaths of allegiance that were sworn to his rule. 60.5.2.  His grandmother Livia he not only honoured with equestrian contests but also deified; and he set up a statue to her in the temple of Augustus, charging the Vestal Virgins with the duty of offering the proper sacrifices, and he ordered that women should use her name in taking oaths.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
caligula Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
censors and census Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
claudius, and senators admits non-members to sessions Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
claudius, wives of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
cornelia Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
family, imperial Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
flamen dialis Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
freedmen Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
freedmen attend senate Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
livia Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
memory, cultic, decline and Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
messalina Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
narcissus Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
numa Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
ostorius sabinus Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
pallas Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
priests and priesthoods' Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
rhescuporis Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
senate, in latin and greek, non-members Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
senate, in latin and greek, procedure Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
senate, in latin and greek, receives envoys Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
senate, in latin and greek, sessions arms and soldiers Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
senate, in latin and greek, women Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
senate Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
sulpicia praetextata Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157
vestal virgins Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 181
women Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 157