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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 53.20.1


nan Caesar, as I have said, received the name of Augustus, and a sign of no little moment to him occurred that very night; for the Tiber overflowed and covered all of Rome that was on low ground, so that it was navigable for boats. From this sign the soothsayers prophesied that he would rise to great heights and hold the whole city under his sway.


nanCaesar, as I have said, received the name of Augustus, and a sign of no little moment to him occurred that very night; for the Tiber overflowed and covered all of Rome that was on low ground, so that it was navigable for boats. From this sign the soothsayers prophesied that he would rise to great heights and hold the whole city under his sway. 2 And while various persons were trying to outbid one another in different kinds of flattery toward him, one Sextus Pacuvius, or, as others say, Apudius, surpassed them all. In the open senate, namely, he dedicated himself to him after the fashion of the Spaniards and advised the others to do the same.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Livy, History, 4.20.5-4.20.11, 5.15.4, 5.15.8, 5.15.10-5.15.11, 7.3.2, 30.38.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Plutarch, Julius Caesar, 47 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Suetonius, Claudius, 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Suetonius, Iulius, 77, 32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Tacitus, Annals, 1.28.2-1.28.3, 4.64.1, 12.43 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.64.1.  The disaster had not yet faded from memory, when a fierce outbreak of fire affected the city to an unusual degree by burning down the Caelian Hill. "It was a fatal year, and the sovereign's decision to absent himself had been adopted under an evil star" — so men began to remark, converting, as is the habit of the crowd, the fortuitous into the culpable, when the Caesar checked the critics by a distribution of money in proportion to loss sustained. Thanks were returned to him; in the senate, by the noble; in the streets, by the voice of the people: for without respect of persons, and without the intercession of relatives, he had aided with his liberality even unknown sufferers whom he had himself encouraged to apply. Proposals were added that the Caelian Hill should for the future be known as the Augustan, since, with all around on fire, the one thing to remain unscathed had been a bust of Tiberius in the house of the senator Junius. "The same," it was said, "had happened formerly to Claudia Quinta; whose statue, twice escaped from the fury of the flames, our ancestors had dedicated in the temple of the Mother of the Gods. The Claudian race was sacrosanct and acceptable to Heaven, and additional solemnity should be given to the ground on which the gods had shown so notable an honour to the sovereign. 12.43.  Many prodigies occurred during the year. Ominous birds took their seat on the Capitol; houses were overturned by repeated shocks of earthquake, and, as the panic spread, the weak were trampled underfoot in the trepidation of the crowd. A shortage of corn, again, and the famine which resulted, were construed as a supernatural warning. Nor were the complaints always whispered. Claudius, sitting in judgement, was surrounded by a wildly clamorous mob, and, driven into the farthest corner of the Forum, was there subjected to violent pressure, until, with the help of a body of troops, he forced a way through the hostile throng. It was established that the capital had provisions for fifteen days, no more; and the crisis was relieved only by the especial grace of the gods and the mildness of the winter. And yet, Heaven knows, in the past, Italy exported supplies for the legions into remote provinces; nor is sterility the trouble now, but we cultivate Africa and Egypt by preference, and the life of the Roman nation has been staked upon cargo-boats and accidents.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
augurs Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
augustus, and astrology Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
augustus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
augustus (octavian) Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
authority, of ammianus, of livy Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
birds, eagle-owls Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
capricorn Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
control, sibylline books and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
decisions, consultation of sibylline books Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
dedications Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
disciplina, etrusca Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
earthquakes Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
emotions, prodigy reports and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
expiation Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48; Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
flood, prodigial Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
floods Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
haruspices Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48; Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
interpretation, of prodigies Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
julius caesar, c. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
jupiter capitolinus/optimus maximus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
mantis Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
narrative Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
narratives, prodigies and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
octavian/augustus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
octavian Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
omens Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
pax deorum Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
periodization of prodigy reports, between princeps and senate Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
pontifices, and prodigies Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
princeps Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
private divination Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
prodigies, as wrath of gods Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
prodigies, assessment Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
prodigies, in early principate Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
prodigies, in livy Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 48
prodigy Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
prodigy reports Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
religion Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
rome, early principate Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
senate/senators' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
sibylline books Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
signs Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
tacitus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
tiber river Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
tiberius Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
veii Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 243
zeus alexikakos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164