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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



2165
Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.45.3


nan Another likeness they set up in the temple of Quirinus with the inscription, "To the Invincible God," and another on the Capitol beside the former kings of Rome.


nanAnother likeness they set up in the temple of Quirinus with the inscription, "To the Invincible God," and another on the Capitol beside the former kings of Rome. 4 Now it occurs to me to marvel at the coincidence: there were eight such statues, — seven to the kings, and an eighth to the Brutus who overthrew the Tarquins, — and they set up the statue of Caesar beside the last of these; and it was from this cause chiefly that the other Brutus, Marcus, was roused to plot against him.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Cicero, De Domo Sua, 103, 111-112, 114, 130, 102 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

102. alter ex ipsa caede volucrem nuntium Ameriam ad socium atque adeo adeo A. Eberhard : ad codd. magistrum suum misit ut, si dissimulare omnes cuperent se scire ad quem maleficium pertineret, tamen ipse apertum suum scelus ante omnium oculos poneret. alter, si dis immortalibus placet, testimonium etiam in Sex. Roscium dicturus est; quasi vero id nunc agatur, utrum is quod dixerit credendum, ac non id nunc... ac non Jeep ( cf. §92): id nunc... an (aut ψ ) codd. : non id nunc... an Madvig quod fecerit vindicandum sit. itaque ita Schol. more maiorum comparatum est ut ut ut vel Halm in minimis rebus homines amplissimi testimonium de sua re non dicerent.
2. Cicero, De Oratore, 2.266 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.266. quisque optime Graece sciret, ita esse nequissimum." Valde autem ridentur etiam imagines, quae fere in deformitatem aut in aliquod vitium corporis ducuntur cum similitudine turpioris: ut meum illud in Helvium Manciam "iam ostendam cuius modi sis," cum ille "ostende, quaeso"; demonstravi digito pictum Gallum in Mariano scuto Cimbrico sub Novis distortum, eiecta lingua, buccis fluentibus; risus est commotus; nihil tam Manciae simile visum est; ut cum Tito Pinario mentum in dicendo intorquenti: "tum ut
3. Cicero, Republic, 1.64 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.64. iusto quidem rege cum est populus orbatus, 'pectora diu tenet desiderium', sicut ait Ennius, 'post optimi regis obitum'; simul inter Sese sic memorant: 'o Romule, Romule die, Qualem te patriae custodem di genuerunt! O pater, o genitor, o sanguen dis oriundum!' Non eros nec dominos appellabant eos, quibus iuste paruerunt, denique ne reges quidem, sed patriae custodes, sed patres, sed deos; nec sine causa; quid enim adiungunt? Tu produxisti nos intra luminis oras. Vitam, honorem, decus sibi datum esse iustitia regis existimabant. Mansisset eadem voluntas in eorum posteris, si regum similitudo permansisset, sed vides unius iniustitia concidisse genus illud totum rei publicae. L. Video vero, inquit, et studeo cursus istos mutationum non magis in nostra quam in omni re publica noscere.
4. Cicero, Letters, 6.1.17, 12.45.2, 13.28.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Letters, 6.1.17, 12.45.2, 13.28.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Letters, 6.1.17, 12.45.2, 13.28.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, Letters, 6.1.17, 12.45.2, 13.28.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Cicero, Letters To Quintus, 3.1.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.4.126 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Cicero, Philippicae, 2.26 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Cicero, Pro Caelio, 78 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Varro, On Agriculture, 3.5.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

13. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Livy, History, 5.47.3, 9.46.7, 10.46.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31.48, 31.71, 31.155 (1st cent. CE

31.48.  Moreover, the plea that they stand on public property is most absurd, if this is really held to be an indication that they do not belong to those who received them, but to the city. Why, if that be true, it will be possible to say that also the things which are on sale in the centre of the market-place belong to the commonwealth, and that the boats, no doubt, do belong, not to their possessors, but to the city, just because they are lying in the harbours. Then, too, an argument which I heard a man advance, as a very strong one in support of that position, I am not disposed to conceal from you: he said that you have made an official list of your statues. What, pray, is the significance of that? Why, the country lying opposite us, Carpathos yonder, the mainland, the other islands, and in general many possessions can be found which the city has listed in its public records, but they have been parcelled out among individuals. 31.71.  Come, then, if any one were to question the magistrate who is set over you, who commands that the inscription be erased and another man's name engraved in its place, asking: "What does this mean? Ye gods, has this man been found guilty of having done the city some terrible wrong so many years after the deed?" In heaven's name, do you not think that he would be deterred, surely if he is a man of common decency? For my part I think that even the mason will blush for shame. And then if children or kinsmen of the great man should happen to appear, what floods of tears do you think they will shed when some one begins to obliterate the name? 31.155.  For instance, many people assert that the statues of the Rhodians are like actors. For just as every actor makes his entrance as one character at one time and at another as another, so likewise your statues assume different rôles at different times and stand almost as if they were acting a part. For instance, one and the same statue, they say, is at one time a Greek, at another time a Roman, and later on, if it so happens, a Macedonian or a Persian; and what is more, with some statues the deception is so obvious that the beholder at once is aware of the deceit. For in fact, clothing, foot-gear, and everything else of that kind expose the fraud.
16. Martial, Epigrams, 1.108.3-1.108.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Martial, Epigrams, 1.108.3-1.108.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.213, 34.18, 34.64, 34.84, 35.4, 35.25, 35.85-35.86, 35.128 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Plutarch, Brutus, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Plutarch, Marius, 2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Tacitus, Annals, 1.74 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.74.  Before long, Granius Marcellus, praetor of Bithynia, found himself accused of treason by his own quaestor, Caepio Crispinus, with Hispo Romanus to back the charge. Caepio was the pioneer in a walk of life which the miseries of the age and effronteries of men soon rendered popular. Indigent, unknown, unresting, first creeping, with his private reports, into the confidence of his pitiless sovereign, then a terror to the noblest, he acquired the favour of one man, the hatred of all, and set an example, the followers of which passed from beggary to wealth, from being despised to being feared, and crowned at last the ruin of others by their own. He alleged that Marcellus had retailed sinister anecdotes about Tiberius: a damning indictment, when the accuser selected the foulest qualities of the imperial character, and attributed their mention to the accused. For, as the facts were true, they were also believed to have been related! Hispo added that Marcellus' own statue was placed on higher ground than those of the Caesars, while in another the head of Augustus had been struck off to make room for the portrait of Tiberius. This incensed the emperor to such a degree that, breaking through his taciturnity, he exclaimed that, in this case, he too would vote, openly and under oath, — the object being to impose a similar obligation on the rest. There remained even yet some traces of dying liberty. Accordingly Gnaeus Piso inquired: "In what order will you register your opinion, Caesar? If first, I shall have something to follow: if last of all, I fear I may inadvertently find myself on the other side." The words went home; and with a meekness that showed how profoundly he rued his unwary outburst, he voted for the acquittal of the defendant on the counts of treason. The charge of peculation went before the appropriate commission.
22. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

23. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.45.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

43.45.4.  Now it occurs to me to marvel at the coincidence: there were eight such statues, — seven to the kings, and an eighth to the Brutus who overthrew the Tarquins, — and they set up the statue of Caesar beside the last of these; and it was from this cause chiefly that the other Brutus, Marcus, was roused to plot against him.
24. Gellius, Attic Nights, 6.1.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.7.1, 10.19.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.7.1. It seems that from the beginning the sanctuary at Delphi has been plotted against by a vast number of men. Attacks were made against it by this Euboean pirate, and years afterwards by the Phlegyan nation; furthermore by Pyrrhus, son of Achilles, by a portion of the army of Xerxes, by the Phocian chieftains, whose attacks on the wealth of the god were the longest and fiercest, and by the Gallic invaders. It was fated too that Delphi was to suffer from the universal irreverence of Nero, who robbed Apollo of five hundred bronze statues, some of gods, some of men. 10.19.2. When the fleet of Xerxes was attacked by a violent storm off Mount Pelion, father and daughter completed its destruction by dragging away under the sea the anchors and any other security the triremes had. In return for this deed the Amphictyons dedicated statues of Scyllis and his daughter. The statue of Hydna completed the number of the statues that Nero carried off from Delphi . Only those of the female sex who are pure virgins may dive into the sea. This sentence is probably a marginal note which has crept into the text.
26. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.39, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.39. To Mustius. I have been warned by the haruspices to put into better repair and enlarge the temple of Ceres, which stands on my estate, as it is very old and cramped for room, and on one day in the year attracts great crowds of people. For on the Ides of September all the population of the country-side flocks thither; much business is transacted, many vows are registered and paid, but there is no place near where people can take refuge either from storm or heat. I think, therefore, that I shall be showing my generosity, and at the same time display my piety, if I rebuild the temple as handsomely as possible and add to it a portico, the former for the use of the goddess, the latter for the people who attend there. So I should like you to buy me four columns of any kind of marble you think fit, as well as sufficient marble for the pavement and walls. I shall also have to get made or buy a statue of the goddess, for the old one, which was made of wood, has lost some of its limbs through age. As for the portico, I don't think there is anything that I need ask you for at present, unless it be that you should sketch me a plan to suit the situation of the place. The portico cannot be carried all round the temple, inasmuch as on one side of the floor of the building there is a river with very steep banks, and on the other there runs a road. Beyond the road, there is a spacious meadow which would be a very suitable place to build the portico, as it is right opposite the temple, unless you can think of a better plan - you who make a practice of overcoming natural difficulties by your professional skill. Farewell. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
27. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 9.39, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.39. To Mustius. I have been warned by the haruspices to put into better repair and enlarge the temple of Ceres, which stands on my estate, as it is very old and cramped for room, and on one day in the year attracts great crowds of people. For on the Ides of September all the population of the country-side flocks thither; much business is transacted, many vows are registered and paid, but there is no place near where people can take refuge either from storm or heat. I think, therefore, that I shall be showing my generosity, and at the same time display my piety, if I rebuild the temple as handsomely as possible and add to it a portico, the former for the use of the goddess, the latter for the people who attend there. So I should like you to buy me four columns of any kind of marble you think fit, as well as sufficient marble for the pavement and walls. I shall also have to get made or buy a statue of the goddess, for the old one, which was made of wood, has lost some of its limbs through age. As for the portico, I don't think there is anything that I need ask you for at present, unless it be that you should sketch me a plan to suit the situation of the place. The portico cannot be carried all round the temple, inasmuch as on one side of the floor of the building there is a river with very steep banks, and on the other there runs a road. Beyond the road, there is a spacious meadow which would be a very suitable place to build the portico, as it is right opposite the temple, unless you can think of a better plan - you who make a practice of overcoming natural difficulties by your professional skill. Farewell. 10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
28. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 1.11.3-1.11.4, 2.61.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acilius glabrio, m., dedicates statue of his father Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
acilius glabrio, m., dedicates temple of pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
aemilius lepidus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
agrippina the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
alexander the great, and apelles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
alexander the great, repatriates greek art from persia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
alexander the great Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
artist, as critics Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
artist, treatises by Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
augustus, emperor, 173 Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
augustus Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
authentic versus copy, and education Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
cassius longinus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
cimbri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
clodius pulcher, p., erects a temple of libertas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
construction, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
deification, ascent to heavens Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
deification, corporeal deification Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
deity, temples to Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
delos Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
dining Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
doubt Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
elsner, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
ennius Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
epiphany, of romulus-quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
euhemerus, euhemeristic Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
euphranor, his de symmetria et coloribus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
euphranor, portrait of theseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
gauls Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
greek, art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
holliday, p. j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
impietas against, political use of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
julius caesar, c., image on the capitoline Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
julius caesar, deification, divinity Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
junius brutus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
lucian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
lutatius catulus, q., defeats cimbri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
marcius philippus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
marius, c., defeats cimbri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
marius, c., statue in ravenna Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
martial, economic status of Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
martial Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
megabyzus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
mithraeum Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
miturnae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
monster, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
nero Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
ostia Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
painting, in roman education Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
parrhasius, his theseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
patronage Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
pausanias Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
persia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
pliny the elder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
pliny the younger, on artists Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
populus romanus, its role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
porticus octaviae (formerly porticus metelli) Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
rationalising Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
rome, forum holitorium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, forum romanum, and the tabernae argentariae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
rome, palatine hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
rome, statues of seven kings on Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153, 291
rome, temple of fortuna primigenia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
rome, temple of fortuna publica citerior Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
rome, temple of fortuna publica populi romani Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
rome, temple of quirinus, caesars statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, temple of tellus, ciceros interest in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
rome, tres fortunae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
rome (ancient), prominent families Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
rome (city) Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
romulus, deified, quirinus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
romulus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
rüsen, jörn, scipio, q. caecilius metellus Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
scepticism Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
scipio, q. caecilius metellus macedonicus Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
scipio aemilianus, p. cornelius (africanus the younger) Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
scipio africanus Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
scipio nasica serapio Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 135
senate, and adulation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
senate, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
shields Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
statues, proliferation' Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
statues Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 173
synagogue Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
tanagra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
tullius cicero, m., conflict with p. clodius pulcher Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
tullius cicero, m., his house in rome Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153
tullius cicero, m., on artists Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
tullius cicero, q., his statue Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 291
verres, c., looting of sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 83
vespasian, reuses neros greek plunder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 153