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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1850
Basil Of Caesarea, Homiliae In Hexaemeron, 8.2
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 3.24 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3.24. וַיְגָרֶשׁ אֶת־הָאָדָם וַיַּשְׁכֵּן מִקֶּדֶם לְגַן־עֵדֶן אֶת־הַכְּרֻבִים וְאֵת לַהַט הַחֶרֶב הַמִּתְהַפֶּכֶת לִשְׁמֹר אֶת־דֶּרֶךְ עֵץ הַחַיִּים׃ 3.24. So He drove out the man; and He placed at the east of the garden of Eden the cherubim, and the flaming sword which turned every way, to keep the way to the tree of life."
2. New Testament, Acts, 17.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17.2. Paul, as was his custom, went in to them, and for three Sabbath days reasoned with them from the Scriptures
3. New Testament, Luke, 23.43 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

23.43. Jesus said to him, "Assuredly I tell you, today you will be with me in Paradise.
4. Justin, Dialogue With Trypho, 4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Old Man: Is there, then, such and so great power in our mind? Or can a man not perceive by sense sooner? Will the mind of man see God at any time, if it is uninstructed by the Holy Spirit? Justin: Plato indeed says that the mind's eye is of such a nature, and has been given for this end, that we may see that very Being when the mind is pure itself, who is the cause of all discerned by the mind, having no color, no form, no greatness- nothing, indeed, which the bodily eye looks upon; but It is something of this sort, he goes on to say, that is beyond all essence, unutterable and inexplicable, but alone honourable and good, coming suddenly into souls well-dispositioned, on account of their affinity to and desire of seeing Him. Old Man: What affinity, then, is there between us and God? Is the soul also divine and immortal, and a part of that very regal mind? And even as that sees God, so also is it attainable by us to conceive of the Deity in our mind, and thence to become happy? Justin: Assuredly. Old Man: And do all the souls of all living beings comprehend Him? Or are the souls of men of one kind and the souls of horses and of asses of another kind? Justin: No. But the souls which are in all are similar. Old Man: Then, shall both horses and asses see, or have they seen at some time or other, God. Justin: No, for the majority of men will not, saving such as shall live justly, purified by righteousness, and by every other virtue. Old Man: It is not, therefore, on account of his affinity, that a man sees God, nor because he has a mind, but because he is temperate and righteous? Justin: Yes, and because he has that whereby he perceives God. Old Man: What then? Do goats or sheep injure any one? Justin: No one in any respect. Old Man: Therefore these animals will see [God], according to your account. Justin: No; for their body being of such a nature, is an obstacle to them. Old Man: If these animals could assume speech, be well assured that they would with greater reason ridicule our body; but let us now dismiss this subject, and let it be conceded to you as you say. Tell me, however, this: Does the soul see [God] so long as it is in the body, or after it has been removed from it? Justin: So long as it is in the form of a man, it is possible for it to attain to this by means of the mind; but especially when it has been set free from the body, and being apart by itself, it gets possession of that which it was wont continually and wholly to love. Old Man: Does it remember this, then [the sight of God], when it is again in the man? Justin: It does not appear to me so. Old Man: What, then, is the advantage to those who have seen [God]? Or what has he who has seen more than he who has not seen, unless he remember this fact, that he has seen? Justin: I cannot tell. Old Man: And what do those suffer who are judged to be unworthy of this spectacle? Justin: They are imprisoned in the bodies of certain wild beasts, and this is their punishment. Old Man: Do they know, then, that it is for this reason they are in such forms, and that they have committed some sin? Justin: I do not think so. Old Man: Then these reap no advantage from their punishment, as it seems: moreover, I would say that they are not punished unless they are conscious of the punishment. Justin: No indeed. Old Man: Therefore souls neither see God nor transmigrate into other bodies; for they would know that so they are punished, and they would be afraid to commit even the most trivial sin afterwards. But that they can perceive that God exists, and that righteousness and piety are honourable, I also quite agree with you. Justin: You are right.
5. Augustine, The City of God, 12.27 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

12.27. With good cause, therefore, does the true religion recognize and proclaim that the same God who created the universal cosmos, created also all the animals, souls as well as bodies. Among the terrestrial animals man was made by Him in His own image, and, for the reason I have given, was made one individual, though he was not left solitary. For there is nothing so social by nature, so unsocial by its corruption, as this race. And human nature has nothing more appropriate, either for the prevention of discord, or for the healing of it, where it exists, than the remembrance of that first parent of us all, whom God was pleased to create alone, that all men might be derived from one, and that they might thus be admonished to preserve unity among their whole multitude. But from the fact that the woman was made for him from his side, it was plainly meant that we should learn how dear the bond between man and wife should be. These works of God do certainly seem extraordinary, because they are the first works. They who do not believe them, ought not to believe any prodigies; for these would not be called prodigies did they not happen out of the ordinary course of nature. But, is it possible that anything should happen in vain, however hidden be its cause, in so grand a government of divine providence? One of the sacred Psalmists says, Come, behold the works of the Lord, what prodigies He has wrought in the earth. Why God made woman out of man's side, and what this first prodigy prefigured, I shall, with God's help, tell in another place. But at present, since this book must be concluded, let us merely say that in this first man, who was created in the beginning, there was laid the foundation, not indeed evidently, but in God's foreknowledge, of these two cities or societies, so far as regards the human race. For from that man all men were to be derived - some of them to be associated with the good angels in their reward, others with the wicked in punishment; all being ordered by the secret yet just judgment of God. For since it is written, All the paths of the Lord are mercy and truth, neither can His grace be unjust, nor His justice cruel.
6. Gregory of Nazianzus, Orations, 27.10 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

7. Gregory of Nyssa, De Vita Mosis, 2.116 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ambrose of milan, on transmigration Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
athens Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
basil Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
basil of caesarea, on detachment Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 300
basil of caesarea, quod rebus mundanis adhaerendum non sit Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 300
body Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
cappadocia Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
cappadocian fathers/cappadocians Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
church fathers Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
cosmos Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
curriculum Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
father Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
form/forms/ideas Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
gregory nazianzen Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
gregory of nyssa, first homily on the martyrs of sebaste Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 300
gregory of nyssa Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
hellenic/hellenism Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
homilies, as modes of knowing, preacher/congregant dynamic' Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 300
homilies, as modes of knowing Ayres Champion and Crawford, The Intellectual World of Late Antique Christianity: Reshaping Classical Traditions (2023) 300
irrationality Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
justin martyr, on transmigration Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
late antiquity/later antiquity Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
models Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
moses Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
nemesius of emesa Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
oration Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
origen Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
pagan/paganism Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
plato Fowler, Plato in the Third Sophistic (2014) 193
polemic Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
resurrection, transmigration and - Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
transmigration (μετενσωμάτωσις), humans to animals Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
transmigration (μετενσωμάτωσις), metaphorical interpretation of Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233
transmigration (μετενσωμάτωσις), rejected by christians Joosse, Olympiodorus of Alexandria: Exegete, Teacher, Platonic Philosopher (2021) 233