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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1632
Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 21


nanI built the temple of Mars the Avenger and the Forum Augustum on private ground from the proceeds of booty. I built the theatre adjacent to the temple of Apollo on ground in large part bought from private owners, and provided that it should be called after Marcus Marcellus, my son-in-law. 2 From the proceeds of booty I dedicated gifts in the Capitol and in the temple of the divine Julius, that of Apollo, that of Vesta and of Mars the Avenger; this cost me about 100,000,000 sesterces. 3 In my fifth consulship [28 BC] I remitted 55,000 lb. of aurum coronarium contributed by the municipia and colonies of Italy to my triumphs, and later, whenever I was acclaimed imperator, I refused the aurum coronarium which the municipia and colonies continued to vote with the same good will as before.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 2.76-2.77 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.76. Sed de hoc loco plura in aliis, nunc hactenus. Externa enim auguria, quae sunt non tam artificiosa quam superstitiosa, videamus. Omnibus fere avibus utuntur, nos admodum paucis; alia illis sinistra sunt, alia nostris. Solebat ex me Deiotarus percontari nostri augurii disciplinam, ego ex illo sui. Di immortales! quantum differebat! ut quaedam essent etiam contraria. Atque ille iis semper utebatur, nos, nisi dum a populo auspicia accepta habemus, quam multum iis utimur? Bellicam rem administrari maiores nostri nisi auspicato noluerunt; quam multi anni sunt, cum bella a proconsulibus et a propraetoribus administrantur 2.77. qui auspicia non habent! Itaque nec amnis transeunt auspicato nec tripudio auspicantur. Ubi ergo avium divinatio? quae, quoniam ab iis, qui auspicia nulla habent, bella administrantur, ad urbanas res retenta videtur, a bellicis esse sublata. Nam ex acuminibus quidem, quod totum auspicium militare est, iam M. Marcellus ille quinquiens consul totum omisit, idem imperator, idem augur optumus. Et quidem ille dicebat, si quando rem agere vellet, ne impediretur auspiciis, lectica operta facere iter se solere. Huic simile est, quod nos augures praecipimus, ne iuges auspicium obveniat, ut iumenta iubeant diiungere. 2.76. But we shall discuss the latter point at greater length in other discourses; let us dismiss it for the present.Now let us examine augury as practised among foreign nations, whose methods are not so artificial as they are superstitious. They employ almost all kinds of birds, we only a few; they regard some signs as favourable, we, others. Deiotarus used to question me a great deal about our system of augury, and I him about that of his country. Ye gods! how much they differed! So much that in some cases they were directly the reverse of each other. He employed auspices constantly, we never do except when the duty of doing so is imposed by a vote of the people. Our ancestors would not undertake any military enterprise without consulting the auspices; but now, for many years, our wars have been conducted by pro-consuls and pro-praetors, who do not have the right to take auspices. 2.77. Therefore they have no tripudium and they cross rivers without first taking the auspices. What, then, has become of divining by means of birds? It is not used by those who conduct our wars, for they have not the right of auspices. Since it has been withdrawn from use in the field I suppose it is reserved for city use only!As to divination ex acuminibus, which is altogether military, it was wholly ignored by that famous man, Marcus Marcellus, who was consul five times and, besides, was a commander-in‑chief, as well as a very fine augur. In fact, he used to say that, if he wished to execute some manoeuvre which he did not want interfered with by the auspices, he would travel in a closed litter. His method is of a kind with the advice which we augurs give, that the draught cattle be ordered to be unyoked so as to prevent a iuge auspicium.
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.9. Or are we to make light of the famous augural staff of Attus Navius, wherewith he marked out the vineyard into sections for the purpose of discovering the pig? I would agree that we might do so, had not King Hostilius fought great and glorious wars under the guidance of Attus's augury. But owing to the carelessness of our nobility the augural lore has been forgotten, and the reality of the auspices has fallen into contempt, only the outward show being retained; and in consequence highly important departments of public administration, and in particular the conduct of wars upon which the safety of the state depends, are carried on without any auspices at all; no taking of omens when crossing rivers, none when lights flash from the points of the javelins, none when men are called to arms (owing to which wills made on active service have gone out of existence, since our generals only enter on their military command when they have laid down their augural powers).
3. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 8.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.34. 1.  The town being taken in this manner, he ordered the prisoners to deliver up their arms, and taking such of their children for hostages as he thought fit, he marched against the Antemnates. And having conquered their army also, in the same manner as the other, by falling upon them unexpectedly while they were still dispersed in foraging, and having accorded the same treatment to the prisoners, he led his army home, carrying with him the spoils of those who had been slain in battle and the choicest part of the booty as an offering to the gods; and he offered many sacrifices besides.,2.  Romulus himself came last in the procession, clad in a purple robe and wearing a crown of laurel upon his head, and, that he might maintain the royal dignity, he rode in a chariot drawn by four horses. The rest of the army, both foot and horse, followed, ranged in their several divisions, praising the gods in songs of their country and extolling their general in improvised verses. They were met by the citizens with their wives and children, who, ranging themselves on each side of the road, congratulated them upon their victory and expressed their welcome in every other way. When the army entered the city, they found mixing bowls filled to the brim with wine and tables loaded down with all sorts of viands, which were placed before the most distinguished houses in order that all who pleased might take their fill.,3.  Such was the victorious procession, marked by the carrying of trophies and concluding with a sacrifice, which the Romans call a triumph, as it was first instituted by Romulus. But in our day the triumph had become a very costly and ostentatious pageant, being attended with a theatrical pomp that is designed rather as a display of wealth than as approbation of valour, and it has departed in every respect from its ancient simplicity.,4.  After the procession and the sacrifice Romulus built a small temple on the summit of the Capitoline hill to Jupiter whom the Romans call Feretrius; indeed, the ancient traces of it still remain, of which the longest sides are less than fifteen feet. In this temple he consecrated the spoils of the king of the Caeninenses, whom he had slain with his own hand. As for Jupiter Feretrius, to whom Romulus dedicated these arms, one will not err from the truth whether one wishes to call him Tropaiouchos, or Skylophoros, as some will have it, or, since he excels all things and comprehends universal nature and motion, Hyperpheretês.
5. Livy, History, 2.8.7-2.8.8, 2.27.5, 4.29.7, 9.46.6-9.46.7, 38.56 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Fasti, 2.58, 2.61, 2.63 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.58. On the Kalends, are now, they are fallen with the lapse of time. 2.61. Under whose rule the shrines are untouched by age: 2.63. Pious one, you who build and repair the temples
7. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE

8. Sallust, Catiline, 10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Strabo, Geography, 5.3.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.3.7. In the interior, the first city above Ostia is Rome; it is the only city built on the Tiber. It has been remarked above, that its position was fixed, not by choice, but necessity; to this must be added, that those who afterwards enlarged it, were not at liberty to select a better site, being prevented by what was already built. The first [kings] fortified the Capitol, the Palatium, and the Collis Quirinalis, which was so easy of access, that when Titus Tatius came to avenge the rape of the [Sabine] virgins, he took it on the first assault. Ancus Marcius, who added Mount Caelius and the Aventine Mount with the intermediate plain, separated as these places were both from each other and from what had been formerly fortified, was compelled to do this of necessity; since he did not consider it proper to leave outside his walls, heights so well protected by nature, to whomsoever might have a mind to fortify themselves upon them, while at the same time he was not capable of enclosing the whole as far as Mount Quirinus. Servius perceived this defect, and added the Esquiline and Viminal hills. As these were both of easy access from without, a deep trench was dug outside them and the earth thrown up on the inside, thus forming a terrace of 6 stadia in length along the inner side of the trench. This terrace he surmounted with a wall flanked with towers, and extending from the Colline to the Esquiline gate. Midway along the terrace is a third gate, named after the Viminal hill. Such is the Roman rampart, which seems to stand in need of other ramparts itself. But it seems to me that the first [founders] were of opinion, both in regard to themselves and their successors, that Romans had to depend not on fortifications, but on arms and their individual valour, both for safety and for wealth, and that walls were not a defence to men, but men were a defence to walls. At the period of its commencement, when the large and fertile districts surrounding the city belonged to others, and while it lay easily open to assault, there was nothing in its position which could be looked upon as favourable; but when by valour and labour these districts became its own, there succeeded a tide of prosperity surpassing the advantages of every other place. Thus, notwithstanding the prodigious increase of the city, there has been plenty of food, and also of wood and stone for ceaseless building, rendered necessary by the falling down of houses, and on account of conflagrations, and of the sales, which seem never to cease. These sales are a kind of voluntary falling down of houses, each owner knocking down and rebuilding one part or another, according to his individual taste. For these purposes the numerous quarries, the forests, and the rivers which convey the materials, offer wonderful facilities. of these rivers, the first is the Teverone, which flows from Alba, a city of the Latins near to the country of the Marsi, and from thence through the plain below this [city], till it unites with the Tiber. After this come the Nera (Nar) and the Timia, which passing through Ombrica fall into the Tiber, and the Chiana, which flows through Tyrrhenia and the territory of Clusiumn. Augustus Caesar endeavoured to avert from the city damages of the kind alluded to, and instituted a company of freedmen, who should be ready to lend their assistance in cases of conflagration; whilst, as a preventive against the falling of houses, he decreed that all new buildings should not be carried so high as formerly, and that those erected along the public ways should not exceed seventy feet in height. But these improvements must have ceased only for the facilities afforded by the quarries, the forests, and the ease of transport.
10. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.5-1.1.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Appian, Civil Wars, 5.130 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Juvenal, Satires, 3.183, 11.22, 14.86-14.91 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Marius, 12.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Suetonius, Augustus, 28.3, 29.4, 31.4-31.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Tiberius, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Tacitus, Histories, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.72.  This was the saddest and most shameful crime that the Roman state had ever suffered since its foundation. Rome had no foreign foe; the gods were ready to be propitious if our characters had allowed; and yet the home of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, founded after due auspices by our ancestors as a pledge of empire, which neither Porsenna, when the city gave itself up to him, nor the Gauls when they captured it, could violate — this was the shrine that the mad fury of emperors destroyed! The Capitol had indeed been burned before in civil war, but the crime was that of private individuals. Now it was openly besieged, openly burned — and what were the causes that led to arms? What was the price paid for this great disaster? This temple stood intact so long as we fought for our country. King Tarquinius Priscus had vowed it in the war with the Sabines and had laid its foundations rather to match his hope of future greatness than in accordance with what the fortunes of the Roman people, still moderate, could supply. Later the building was begun by Servius Tullius with the enthusiastic help of Rome's allies, and afterwards carried on by Tarquinius Superbus with the spoils taken from the enemy at the capture of Suessa Pometia. But the glory of completing the work was reserved for liberty: after the expulsion of the kings, Horatius Pulvillus in his second consulship dedicated it; and its magnificence was such that the enormous wealth of the Roman people acquired thereafter adorned rather than increased its splendour. The temple was built again on the same spot when after an interval of four hundred and fifteen years it had been burned in the consulship of Lucius Scipio and Gaius Norbanus. The victorious Sulla undertook the work, but still he did not dedicate it; that was the only thing that his good fortune was refused. Amid all the great works built by the Caesars the name of Lutatius Catulus kept its place down to Vitellius's day. This was the temple that then was burned.
17. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 44.4.4, 49.43.8, 51.19.2, 53.2.4, 53.22.3, 54.35.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

44.4.4.  In addition to these remarkable privileges they named him father of his country, stamped this title on the coinage, voted to celebrate his birthday by public sacrifice, ordered that he should have a statue in the cities and in all the temples of Rome 49.43.8.  And after the Dalmatians had been utterly subjugated, he erected from the spoils thus gained the porticos and the libraries called the Octavian, after his sister. 51.19.2.  Moreover, they decreed that the foundation of the shrine of Julius should be adorned with the beaks of the captured ships and that a festival should be held every four years in honour of Octavius; that there should also be a thanksgiving on his birthday and on the anniversary of the announcement of his victory; also that when he should enter the city the Vestal Virgins and the senate and the people with their wives and children should go out to meet him. 53.2.4.  As for religious matters, he did not allow the Egyptian rites to be celebrated inside the pomerium, but made provision for the temples; those which had been built by private individuals he ordered their sons and descendants, if any survived, to repair, and the rest he restored himself. 53.22.3.  For I am unable to distinguish between the two funds, no matter how extensively Augustus coined into money silver statues of himself which had been set up by certain of his friends and by certain of the subject peoples, purposing thereby to make it appear that all the expenditures which he claimed to be making were from his own means. 54.35.2.  When the senate and the people once more contributed money for statues of Augustus, he would set up no statue of himself, but instead set up statues of Salus Publica, Concordia, and Pax. The citizens, it seems, were nearly always and on every pretext collecting money for this same object, and at last they ceased paying it privately, as one might call it, but would come to him on the very first day of the year and give, some more, some less, into his own hands;
18. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.61.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abbreviations, in calendars Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
aedicula Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
aedis Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
aesthetic approach to art and architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
aetiology Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
ancestors Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
apollo Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
architecture and art, aesthetic approach Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
art and architecture, aesthetic approach Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
augury Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
augustus, and marc antony Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, column dedicated to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, equestrian statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, forum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
augustus, mausoleum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, res gestae monumental text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
augustus, statues to himself forbidden Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19; Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
authority, poetic Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
banquet Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
basilica aemilia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
c. iulius caesar, birthday Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
calendars, marble Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
capitol Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
caryatids, function in de architectura Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
catulus, quintus lutatius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
cicero, marcus tullius Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
cicero, quintus Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
cicero (tullius cicero, m.) Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
ciceromarcus tullius cicero Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
circus, maximus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
civic participation Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
civil war Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
coins Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
concord, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
construction, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
cornelius scipio africanus, p., forbids images to himself Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
cornelius scipio africanus, p., image in temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
cultural imaginary Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
culture, ancient mediterranean Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
de architectura, literariness and textuality Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
dius fidius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
economy, imperial Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
empire Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
epigraphy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
feast days Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
feriae, in the imperial period Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
festivals, ludi saeculares Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
fictionality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
flavius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
forum Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
forum augustum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
fratres arvales Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
freedmen Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
holidays Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
homo nouus Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
horatius, marcus pulvillus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
ideological approach to art and architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
imagination Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
inscriptions, in political process Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
iulius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
julius caesar, c., tomb inside the pomerium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
juno, regina Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, feretrius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, libertas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, tonans Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, beginnings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, restorations Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
juvenal Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
koraiof erechtheum, augustan copies Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
lares Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
leuctra Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
liberalitas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
marius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
mars avenger, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
mater magna Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
mausoleum of augustus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
memoria posteris tradere formula Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
mercury, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
military Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
minerva Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
moderatio Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
modestia Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
monster, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
nicolaus of syracuse Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
ovid Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
pantheon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
patron and client relations Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
paupertas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
peace, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
peace Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
philippi Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
piety, pietas, lack of pietas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
political approach to art and architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
pompey, theatre of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
postumius, spurius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
princeps ciuilis Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
pulvinaria Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
quinctius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
quirinus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
religious innovations, fratres arvales Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
renewal and renovation Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
res gestae divi augusti Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
ritual Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
rome, capitoline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, comitium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, curia hostilia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, forum romanum, and augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, portico of octavia, built with spoils of dalmatia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, portico of octavia, its library Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, rostrum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of divus julius, adorned with rostra from actium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, scipios statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, theatre of balbus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
romulus/quirinus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
salus publica Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
self-restrained omnipotence Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
senate, and adulation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
senate, and people of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, bestows honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, ex senatus consulto Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
senate, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
senate Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126; Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
sparta Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
statuary, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
statuary, over-population of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
tarquin Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, concord Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, dius fidius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of mars avenger Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
temple of mercury Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of peace Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 334
temples, as display expenditure Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, of apollo Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of di penates Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of divus julius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of juno sospita Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
temples, of jupiter feretrius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of jupiter libertas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of jupiter tonans Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of juventas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of mars Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of minerva Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of quirinus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
theatre of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tiberius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tiberius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 189
triple triumph Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
triumphator, garb worn by Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
trophies Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 76
valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
vitellius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
war and temple building Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126