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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1632
Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 20-21


nanI restored the Capitol and the theatre of Pompey, both works at great expense without inscribing my own name on either. 2 I restored the channels of the aqueducts, which in several places were falling into disrepair through age, and I brought water from a new spring into the aqueduct called Marcia, doubling the supply. 3 I completed the Forum Julium and the basilica between the temple of Castor and that of Saturn, works begun and almost finished by my father, and when that same basilica was destroyed by fire [AD 12], I began to rebuild it on an enlarged site, to be dedicated in the name of my sons, and in case I do not complete it in my lifetime, I have given orders that it should be completed by my heirs. 4 In my sixth consulship [28 BC] I restored eighty-two temples of the gods in the city on the authority of the senate, neglecting none that required restoration at that time. 5 In my seventh consulship [27 BC] I restored the Via Flaminia from the city as far as Ariminium, together with all bridges except the Mulvian and the Minucian.


nanI built the temple of Mars the Avenger and the Forum Augustum on private ground from the proceeds of booty. I built the theatre adjacent to the temple of Apollo on ground in large part bought from private owners, and provided that it should be called after Marcus Marcellus, my son-in-law. 2 From the proceeds of booty I dedicated gifts in the Capitol and in the temple of the divine Julius, that of Apollo, that of Vesta and of Mars the Avenger; this cost me about 100,000,000 sesterces. 3 In my fifth consulship [28 BC] I remitted 55,000 lb. of aurum coronarium contributed by the municipia and colonies of Italy to my triumphs, and later, whenever I was acclaimed imperator, I refused the aurum coronarium which the municipia and colonies continued to vote with the same good will as before.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

25 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 2.76-2.77 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.76. Sed de hoc loco plura in aliis, nunc hactenus. Externa enim auguria, quae sunt non tam artificiosa quam superstitiosa, videamus. Omnibus fere avibus utuntur, nos admodum paucis; alia illis sinistra sunt, alia nostris. Solebat ex me Deiotarus percontari nostri augurii disciplinam, ego ex illo sui. Di immortales! quantum differebat! ut quaedam essent etiam contraria. Atque ille iis semper utebatur, nos, nisi dum a populo auspicia accepta habemus, quam multum iis utimur? Bellicam rem administrari maiores nostri nisi auspicato noluerunt; quam multi anni sunt, cum bella a proconsulibus et a propraetoribus administrantur 2.77. qui auspicia non habent! Itaque nec amnis transeunt auspicato nec tripudio auspicantur. Ubi ergo avium divinatio? quae, quoniam ab iis, qui auspicia nulla habent, bella administrantur, ad urbanas res retenta videtur, a bellicis esse sublata. Nam ex acuminibus quidem, quod totum auspicium militare est, iam M. Marcellus ille quinquiens consul totum omisit, idem imperator, idem augur optumus. Et quidem ille dicebat, si quando rem agere vellet, ne impediretur auspiciis, lectica operta facere iter se solere. Huic simile est, quod nos augures praecipimus, ne iuges auspicium obveniat, ut iumenta iubeant diiungere. 2.76. But we shall discuss the latter point at greater length in other discourses; let us dismiss it for the present.Now let us examine augury as practised among foreign nations, whose methods are not so artificial as they are superstitious. They employ almost all kinds of birds, we only a few; they regard some signs as favourable, we, others. Deiotarus used to question me a great deal about our system of augury, and I him about that of his country. Ye gods! how much they differed! So much that in some cases they were directly the reverse of each other. He employed auspices constantly, we never do except when the duty of doing so is imposed by a vote of the people. Our ancestors would not undertake any military enterprise without consulting the auspices; but now, for many years, our wars have been conducted by pro-consuls and pro-praetors, who do not have the right to take auspices. 2.77. Therefore they have no tripudium and they cross rivers without first taking the auspices. What, then, has become of divining by means of birds? It is not used by those who conduct our wars, for they have not the right of auspices. Since it has been withdrawn from use in the field I suppose it is reserved for city use only!As to divination ex acuminibus, which is altogether military, it was wholly ignored by that famous man, Marcus Marcellus, who was consul five times and, besides, was a commander-in‑chief, as well as a very fine augur. In fact, he used to say that, if he wished to execute some manoeuvre which he did not want interfered with by the auspices, he would travel in a closed litter. His method is of a kind with the advice which we augurs give, that the draught cattle be ordered to be unyoked so as to prevent a iuge auspicium.
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.9. Or are we to make light of the famous augural staff of Attus Navius, wherewith he marked out the vineyard into sections for the purpose of discovering the pig? I would agree that we might do so, had not King Hostilius fought great and glorious wars under the guidance of Attus's augury. But owing to the carelessness of our nobility the augural lore has been forgotten, and the reality of the auspices has fallen into contempt, only the outward show being retained; and in consequence highly important departments of public administration, and in particular the conduct of wars upon which the safety of the state depends, are carried on without any auspices at all; no taking of omens when crossing rivers, none when lights flash from the points of the javelins, none when men are called to arms (owing to which wills made on active service have gone out of existence, since our generals only enter on their military command when they have laid down their augural powers).
3. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 8.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Horace, Odes, 3.30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Livy, History, 2.8.7-2.8.8, 2.27.5, 4.29.7, 9.46.6-9.46.7, 38.56 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.67-1.100, 1.103-1.106, 1.131, 1.135-1.170, 1.179, 1.203-1.205, 1.213-1.214, 1.217-1.228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Ovid, Fasti, 1.587-1.590, 2.58, 2.61, 2.63, 4.621-4.622 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.587. offers to the flames the entrails of a gelded ram: 1.588. All the provinces were returned to our people 1.589. And your grandfather was given the name Augustus. 1.590. Read the legends on wax images in noble halls 2.58. On the Kalends, are now, they are fallen with the lapse of time. 2.61. Under whose rule the shrines are untouched by age: 2.63. Pious one, you who build and repair the temples 4.621. Jupiter, titled the Victor, keeps the Ides of April: 4.622. A temple was dedicated to him on this day.
8. Ovid, Tristia, 4.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Propertius, Elegies, 3.4 (1st cent. BCE

10. Sallust, Catiline, 10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

11. Strabo, Geography, 5.3.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.3.7. In the interior, the first city above Ostia is Rome; it is the only city built on the Tiber. It has been remarked above, that its position was fixed, not by choice, but necessity; to this must be added, that those who afterwards enlarged it, were not at liberty to select a better site, being prevented by what was already built. The first [kings] fortified the Capitol, the Palatium, and the Collis Quirinalis, which was so easy of access, that when Titus Tatius came to avenge the rape of the [Sabine] virgins, he took it on the first assault. Ancus Marcius, who added Mount Caelius and the Aventine Mount with the intermediate plain, separated as these places were both from each other and from what had been formerly fortified, was compelled to do this of necessity; since he did not consider it proper to leave outside his walls, heights so well protected by nature, to whomsoever might have a mind to fortify themselves upon them, while at the same time he was not capable of enclosing the whole as far as Mount Quirinus. Servius perceived this defect, and added the Esquiline and Viminal hills. As these were both of easy access from without, a deep trench was dug outside them and the earth thrown up on the inside, thus forming a terrace of 6 stadia in length along the inner side of the trench. This terrace he surmounted with a wall flanked with towers, and extending from the Colline to the Esquiline gate. Midway along the terrace is a third gate, named after the Viminal hill. Such is the Roman rampart, which seems to stand in need of other ramparts itself. But it seems to me that the first [founders] were of opinion, both in regard to themselves and their successors, that Romans had to depend not on fortifications, but on arms and their individual valour, both for safety and for wealth, and that walls were not a defence to men, but men were a defence to walls. At the period of its commencement, when the large and fertile districts surrounding the city belonged to others, and while it lay easily open to assault, there was nothing in its position which could be looked upon as favourable; but when by valour and labour these districts became its own, there succeeded a tide of prosperity surpassing the advantages of every other place. Thus, notwithstanding the prodigious increase of the city, there has been plenty of food, and also of wood and stone for ceaseless building, rendered necessary by the falling down of houses, and on account of conflagrations, and of the sales, which seem never to cease. These sales are a kind of voluntary falling down of houses, each owner knocking down and rebuilding one part or another, according to his individual taste. For these purposes the numerous quarries, the forests, and the rivers which convey the materials, offer wonderful facilities. of these rivers, the first is the Teverone, which flows from Alba, a city of the Latins near to the country of the Marsi, and from thence through the plain below this [city], till it unites with the Tiber. After this come the Nera (Nar) and the Timia, which passing through Ombrica fall into the Tiber, and the Chiana, which flows through Tyrrhenia and the territory of Clusiumn. Augustus Caesar endeavoured to avert from the city damages of the kind alluded to, and instituted a company of freedmen, who should be ready to lend their assistance in cases of conflagration; whilst, as a preventive against the falling of houses, he decreed that all new buildings should not be carried so high as formerly, and that those erected along the public ways should not exceed seventy feet in height. But these improvements must have ceased only for the facilities afforded by the quarries, the forests, and the ease of transport.
12. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.407, 1.498-1.504, 8.671-8.731 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.407. hould bid the Tyrian realms and new-built towers 1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay 1.503. and loaded them with gold; the hoarded wealth 1.504. of vile and covetous Pygmalion 8.671. Seek ye a king from far!’ So in the field 8.672. inert and fearful lies Etruria's force 8.673. disarmed by oracles. Their Tarchon sent 8.674. envoys who bore a sceptre and a crown 8.675. even to me, and prayed I should assume 8.676. the sacred emblems of Etruria's king 8.677. and lead their host to war. But unto me 8.678. cold, sluggish age, now barren and outworn 8.679. denies new kingdoms, and my slow-paced powers 8.680. run to brave deeds no more. Nor could I urge 8.681. my son, who by his Sabine mother's line 8.682. is half Italian-born. Thyself art he 8.683. whose birth illustrious and manly prime 8.684. fate favors and celestial powers approve. 8.685. Therefore go forth, O bravest chief and King 8.686. of Troy and Italy ! To thee I give 8.687. the hope and consolation of our throne 8.688. pallas, my son, and bid him find in thee 8.689. a master and example, while he learns 8.690. the soldier's arduous toil. With thy brave deeds 8.691. let him familiar grow, and reverence thee 8.692. with youthful love and honor. In his train 8.693. two hundred horsemen of Arcadia 8.694. our choicest men-at-arms, shall ride; and he 8.695. in his own name an equal band shall bring 8.696. to follow only thee.” Such the discourse. 8.697. With meditative brows and downcast eyes 8.698. Aeneas and Achates, sad at heart 8.699. mused on unnumbered perils yet to come. 8.700. But out of cloudless sky Cythera's Queen 8.701. gave sudden signal: from th' ethereal dome 8.702. a thunder-peal and flash of quivering fire 8.703. tumultuous broke, as if the world would fall 8.704. and bellowing Tuscan trumpets shook the air. 8.705. All eyes look up. Again and yet again 8.706. crashed the terrible din, and where the sky 8.707. looked clearest hung a visionary cloud 8.708. whence through the brightness blazed resounding arms. 8.709. All hearts stood still. But Troy 's heroic son 8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed 8.711. her pledge in sound of thunder: so he cried 8.712. “Seek not, my friend, seek not thyself to read 8.713. the meaning of the omen. 'T is to me 8.714. Olympus calls. My goddess-mother gave 8.715. long since her promise of a heavenly sign 8.716. if war should burst; and that her power would bring 8.717. a panoply from Vulcan through the air 8.718. to help us at our need. Alas, what deaths 8.719. over Laurentum's ill-starred host impend! 8.720. O Turnus, what a reckoning thou shalt pay 8.721. to me in arms! O Tiber, in thy wave 8.722. what helms and shields and mighty soldiers slain 8.723. hall in confusion roll! Yea, let them lead 8.725. He said: and from the lofty throne uprose. 8.726. Straightway he roused anew the slumbering fire 8.727. acred to Hercules, and glad at heart 8.728. adored, as yesterday, the household gods 8.729. revered by good Evander, at whose side 8.730. the Trojan company made sacrifice 8.731. of chosen lambs, with fitting rites and true.
13. Vergil, Georgics, 3.1-3.48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.1. Thee too, great Pales, will I hymn, and thee 3.2. Amphrysian shepherd, worthy to be sung 3.3. You, woods and waves Lycaean. All themes beside 3.4. Which else had charmed the vacant mind with song 3.5. Are now waxed common. of harsh Eurystheus who 3.6. The story knows not, or that praiseless king 3.7. Busiris, and his altars? or by whom 3.8. Hath not the tale been told of Hylas young 3.9. Latonian Delos and Hippodame 3.10. And Pelops for his ivory shoulder famed 3.11. Keen charioteer? Needs must a path be tried 3.12. By which I too may lift me from the dust 3.13. And float triumphant through the mouths of men. 3.14. Yea, I shall be the first, so life endure 3.15. To lead the Muses with me, as I pa 3.16. To mine own country from the Aonian height; 3.17. I, placeName key= 3.18. of Idumaea, and raise a marble shrine 3.19. On thy green plain fast by the water-side 3.20. Where Mincius winds more vast in lazy coils 3.21. And rims his margent with the tender reed. 3.22. Amid my shrine shall Caesar's godhead dwell. 3.23. To him will I, as victor, bravely dight 3.24. In Tyrian purple, drive along the bank 3.25. A hundred four-horse cars. All placeName key= 3.26. Leaving Alpheus and Molorchus' grove 3.27. On foot shall strive, or with the raw-hide glove; 3.28. Whilst I, my head with stripped green olive crowned 3.29. Will offer gifts. Even 'tis present joy 3.30. To lead the high processions to the fane 3.31. And view the victims felled; or how the scene 3.32. Sunders with shifted face, and placeName key= 3.33. Inwoven thereon with those proud curtains rise. 3.34. of gold and massive ivory on the door 3.35. I'll trace the battle of the Gangarides 3.36. And our Quirinus' conquering arms, and there 3.37. Surging with war, and hugely flowing, the placeName key= 3.38. And columns heaped on high with naval brass. 3.39. And placeName key= 3.40. And quelled Niphates, and the Parthian foe 3.41. Who trusts in flight and backward-volleying darts 3.42. And trophies torn with twice triumphant hand 3.43. From empires twain on ocean's either shore. 3.44. And breathing forms of Parian marble there 3.45. Shall stand, the offspring of Assaracus 3.46. And great names of the Jove-descended folk 3.47. And father Tros, and placeName key= 3.48. of Cynthus. And accursed Envy there
14. Appian, Civil Wars, 5.130 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 19.84-19.98 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19.84. 13. When Cherea had spoken thus, he zealously set about the work, and inspired courage into the rest to go on with it, and they were all eager to fall to it without further delay. So he was at the palace in the morning, with his equestrian sword girt on him; 19.85. for it was the custom that the tribunes should ask for the watchword with their swords on, and this was the day on which Cherea was, by custom, to receive the watchword; 19.86. and the multitude were already come to the palace, to be soon enough for seeing the shows, and that in great crowds, and one tumultuously crushing another, while Caius was delighted with this eagerness of the multitude; for which reason there was no order observed in the seating men, nor was any peculiar place appointed for the senators, or for the equestrian order; but they sat at random, men and women together, and free-men were mixed with the slaves. 19.87. So Caius came out in a solemn manner, and offered sacrifice to Augustus Caesar, in whose honor indeed these shows were celebrated. Now it happened, upon the fall of a certain priest, that the garment of Asprenas, a senator, was filled with blood, which made Caius laugh, although this was an evident omen to Asprenas, for he was slain at the same time with Caius. 19.88. It is also related that Caius was that day, contrary to his usual custom, so very affable and good-natured in his conversation, that every one of those that were present were astonished at it. 19.89. After the sacrifice was over, Caius betook himself to see the shows, and sat down for that purpose, as did also the principal of his friends sit near him. 19.91. When the multitude were set down, and Cherea, with the other tribunes, were set down also, and the right corner of the theater was allotted to Caesar, one Vatinius, a senator, commander of the praetorian band, asked of Cluvius, one that sat by him, and was of consular dignity also, whether he had heard any thing of the news, or not? but took care that nobody should hear what he said; 19.92. and when Cluvius replied, that he had heard no news, “Know then,” said Vatinius, “that the game of the slaughter of tyrants is to be played this day.” But Cluvius replied “O brave comrade hold thy peace, lest some other of the Achaians hear thy tale.” 19.93. And as there was abundance of autumnal fruit thrown among the spectators, and a great number of birds, that were of great value to such as possessed them, on account of their rareness, Caius was pleased with the birds fighting for the fruits, and with the violence wherewith the spectators seized upon them: 19.94. and here he perceived two prodigies that happened there; for an actor was introduced, by whom a leader of robbers was crucified, and the pantomime brought in a play called Cinyras, wherein he himself was to be slain, as well as his daughter Myrrha, and wherein a great deal of fictitious blood was shed, both about him that was crucified, and also about Cinyras. 19.95. It was also confessed that this was the same day wherein Pausanias, a friend of Philip, the son of Amyntas, who was king of Macedonia, slew him, as he was entering into the theater. 19.96. And now Caius was in doubt whether he should tarry to the end of the shows, because it was the last day, or whether he should not go first to the bath, and to dinner, and then return and sit down as before. Hereupon Minucianus, who sat over Caius, and was afraid that the opportunity should fail them, got up, because he saw Cherea was already gone out, and made haste out, to confirm him in his resolution; 19.97. but Caius took hold of his garment, in an obliging way, and said to him, “O brave man! whither art thou going?” Whereupon, out of reverence to Caesar, as it seemed, he sat down again; but his fear prevailed over him, and in a little time he got up again 19.98. and then Caius did no way oppose his going out, as thinking that he went out to perform some necessities of nature. And Asprenas, who was one of the confederates, persuaded Caius to go out to the bath, and to dinner, and then to come in again, as desirous that what had been resolved on might be brought to a conclusion immediately.
16. Juvenal, Satires, 3.183, 11.22, 14.86-14.91 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 75 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Plutarch, Marius, 12.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Suetonius, Augustus, 28.3, 29.4, 31.4-31.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Suetonius, Tiberius, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Tacitus, Histories, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.72.  This was the saddest and most shameful crime that the Roman state had ever suffered since its foundation. Rome had no foreign foe; the gods were ready to be propitious if our characters had allowed; and yet the home of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, founded after due auspices by our ancestors as a pledge of empire, which neither Porsenna, when the city gave itself up to him, nor the Gauls when they captured it, could violate — this was the shrine that the mad fury of emperors destroyed! The Capitol had indeed been burned before in civil war, but the crime was that of private individuals. Now it was openly besieged, openly burned — and what were the causes that led to arms? What was the price paid for this great disaster? This temple stood intact so long as we fought for our country. King Tarquinius Priscus had vowed it in the war with the Sabines and had laid its foundations rather to match his hope of future greatness than in accordance with what the fortunes of the Roman people, still moderate, could supply. Later the building was begun by Servius Tullius with the enthusiastic help of Rome's allies, and afterwards carried on by Tarquinius Superbus with the spoils taken from the enemy at the capture of Suessa Pometia. But the glory of completing the work was reserved for liberty: after the expulsion of the kings, Horatius Pulvillus in his second consulship dedicated it; and its magnificence was such that the enormous wealth of the Roman people acquired thereafter adorned rather than increased its splendour. The temple was built again on the same spot when after an interval of four hundred and fifteen years it had been burned in the consulship of Lucius Scipio and Gaius Norbanus. The victorious Sulla undertook the work, but still he did not dedicate it; that was the only thing that his good fortune was refused. Amid all the great works built by the Caesars the name of Lutatius Catulus kept its place down to Vitellius's day. This was the temple that then was burned.
22. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 44.4.4, 45.6.4, 49.43.8, 51.19.2, 53.2.4, 53.22.3, 54.6.6, 54.35.2, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

44.4.4.  In addition to these remarkable privileges they named him father of his country, stamped this title on the coinage, voted to celebrate his birthday by public sacrifice, ordered that he should have a statue in the cities and in all the temples of Rome 45.6.4.  After this came the festival appointed in honour of the completion of the temple of Venus, which some, while Caesar was still alive, had promised to celebrate, but were now holding in slight regard, even as they did the games in the Circus in honour of the Parilia; so, to win the favour of the populace, he provided for it at his private expense, on the ground that it concerned him because of his family. 49.43.8.  And after the Dalmatians had been utterly subjugated, he erected from the spoils thus gained the porticos and the libraries called the Octavian, after his sister. 51.19.2.  Moreover, they decreed that the foundation of the shrine of Julius should be adorned with the beaks of the captured ships and that a festival should be held every four years in honour of Octavius; that there should also be a thanksgiving on his birthday and on the anniversary of the announcement of his victory; also that when he should enter the city the Vestal Virgins and the senate and the people with their wives and children should go out to meet him. 53.2.4.  As for religious matters, he did not allow the Egyptian rites to be celebrated inside the pomerium, but made provision for the temples; those which had been built by private individuals he ordered their sons and descendants, if any survived, to repair, and the rest he restored himself. 53.22.3.  For I am unable to distinguish between the two funds, no matter how extensively Augustus coined into money silver statues of himself which had been set up by certain of his friends and by certain of the subject peoples, purposing thereby to make it appear that all the expenditures which he claimed to be making were from his own means. 54.6.6.  Agrippa, then, checked whatever other ailments he found still festering, and curtailed the Egyptian rites which were again invading the city, forbidding anyone to perform them even in the suburbs within one mile of the city. And when a disturbance arose over the election of the prefect of the city, the official chosen on account of the Feriae, he did not succeed in quelling it, but they went through that year without this official.   54.35.2.  When the senate and the people once more contributed money for statues of Augustus, he would set up no statue of himself, but instead set up statues of Salus Publica, Concordia, and Pax. The citizens, it seems, were nearly always and on every pretext collecting money for this same object, and at last they ceased paying it privately, as one might call it, but would come to him on the very first day of the year and give, some more, some less, into his own hands; 59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
23. Epigraphy, Cil, 6.896, 6.40776

24. Epigraphy, Ils, 5935-5941, 18

25. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.61.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abbreviations, in calendars Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
acta senatus, distribution of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 163
actian games Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
actium Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
aedicula Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
aedis Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
agrippa, m. Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
alexandria Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
anachronism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
ancestors Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
anchises Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
antium Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
apollo Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131; Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
april Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
augury Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
august, month Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
augustus, and actian games Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
augustus, and marc antony Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, and theatre Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, column dedicated to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
augustus, equestrian statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, mausoleum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, res gestae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
augustus, res gestae monumental text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
augustus, statues to himself forbidden Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 199, 248
augustus/octavian, as performer of a public image Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
augustus/octavian, relation with caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
augustus/octavian Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
augustus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125; Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19; Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
augustus (emperor) Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 97
aurelian Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 163
authorial intention Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
authority, augustan Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
authority, mutual constitution of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
autun Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
banquet Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
boundary markers, termini Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
building inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
buildings, public Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
c. iulius caesar, birthday Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
calendars, local, roman influence on Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 163
calendars, marble Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
calendars, wall Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
caligula (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
capitol Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
caracalla, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
cassius dio Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
catulus, quintus lutatius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
ceres, see also demeter Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
cicero, marcus tullius Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
cicero, quintus Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
cicero (tullius cicero, m.) Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
cippi Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
circus, maximus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
concord, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
consent Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
constantine i Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
construction, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
consualia Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
consul Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 97
copying, of texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
cornelius scipio africanus, p., forbids images to himself Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
cornelius scipio africanus, p., image in temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
corona civica Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
cosmopolis Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
cultural imaginary Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
culture, ancient mediterranean Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
dancers Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
de architectura, literariness and textuality Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
december Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
deus praesens Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
dius fidius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
economy, imperial Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
elite Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
elites, local Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
empire, as territorial expanse Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 199, 248
empire Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
ephesus Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
epigraphy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
euergetism Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
families, blended Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 124
fasti, amiterni Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
fasti, antiates maiores Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
fasti, ostienses Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
fasti, vallenses Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
feast days Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
feriae, in the imperial period Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
festivals, ludi saeculares Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
flavius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
foreigners Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
forum Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
fratres arvales Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
freedmen Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
funeral, laudations Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
gallia narbonensis, province Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
genetrix Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 124
gracchan Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
hadrian, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
herod agrippa Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
herod i, king of judaea Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
heroic songs Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
hispania citerior/tarraconensis, province Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
holidays Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
homo nouus Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
honorific inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
horace Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
horatius, marcus pulvillus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
hybris Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
image Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
immortality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
imperial, tetrarchy Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
inconsistency Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199, 248
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
indeterminacy, horace Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
indeterminacy, strategies Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
inscriptions, in political process Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
inscriptions, typology of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
iulius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
judaea, and theatres/festivals Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
julius caesar, c., tomb inside the pomerium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
june (iunius) Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
juno, regina Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, feretrius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, invictus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
jupiter, libertas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, tonans Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, victor Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
jupiter Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, beginnings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, restorations Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
juvenal Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
kaisareia (festival) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
l. papirius cursor Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
lares Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
laurel Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
lex iulia theatralis Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
libera, see also koré Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
liberalitas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
livia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
m. fulvius nobilior Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
maps and mapping Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
marcellus, death of Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 124
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
margins and marginality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
marius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
marius Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
mark antony Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
mater magna Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
mausoleum of augustus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
memoria posteris tradere formula Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
mercury, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
milestones, miliaria Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
military Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
minerva Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
moderatio Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
modestia Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
monster, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 248
museion, muses, temple of Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
museion Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
neos dionysos Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
octavia Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173; Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 124
octavian Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
ovid Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96, 126
panegyric Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
panegyrists Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
pantheon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
pantomimes, banishment of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
paratexts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
patron and client relations Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
paupertas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
peace Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
performance Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
philip ii of macedon Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
philippi Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
piety, pietas, lack of pietas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 97
pliny the elder Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
plutarch Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
poets, rivalry with the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
pompey, theatre of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
postumius, spurius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
power, of audiences Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
praise Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
princeps ciuilis Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
prophecy Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
provinces Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
public inscriptions Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
pulvinaria Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
quinctius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
quirinal Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
quirinus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
relation with reality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
religious innovations, fratres arvales Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
renewal and renovation Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
res gestae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199, 248
res gestae divi augusti Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
revisionary Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
roads, roman Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
roman cityscape Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 248
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
rome, capitoline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, comitium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, curia hostilia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, forum romanum, and augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, pantheon Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
rome, portico of octavia, built with spoils of dalmatia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, portico of octavia, its library Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, rostrum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of divus julius, adorned with rostra from actium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, scipios statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
rome, theatre of balbus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, theatre of pompey Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
rome Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
salus publica Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
satire Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 97
sebasta (festival) at naples Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
self-restrained omnipotence Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
sempronius gracchus, c., tribune Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
sempronius gracchus, ti., tribune Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
senate, and adulation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
senate, and people of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, bestows honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, ex senatus consulto Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
senate, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
senate/senator Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 97
senate Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199; Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126; Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
senate of rome, as exemplar Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 163
senate of rome, loyalty of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 163
senate of rome, publisher of documents Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 163
septimius severus, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94
spoils Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
statuary, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
statuary, over-population of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
tarquin Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
technitai (artists of dionysus) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
temple Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 199, 248
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, concord Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, dius fidius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of mercury Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, as display expenditure Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, dedication of Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
temples, of apollo Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of consus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
temples, of di penates Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of divus julius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of hercules musarum Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
temples, of juno sospita Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
temples, of jupiter feretrius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of jupiter invictus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
temples, of jupiter libertas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of jupiter tonans Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of jupiter victor Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
temples, of juventas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of mars Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of minerva Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of quirinus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, rededication of Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
temples Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 94; Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
theatre of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
thiasos Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
tiberius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tiberius Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
transcripts, hidden and public Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 199
trier Burgersdijk and Ross, Imagining Emperors in the Later Roman Empire (2018) 131
triumph Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96
triumphator, garb worn by Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 125
valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
valerius maximus Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
venus, and aeneas Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 124
venus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173
virgil Gorain, Language in the Confessions of Augustine (2019) 21
vision and viewership Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 173, 199
visual texts Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
vitellius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
voice' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 248
vows Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 96