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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1632
Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 19


nanI built the Senate House, and the Chalcidicum adjacent to it, the temple of Apollo on the Palatine with its porticoes, the temple of the divine Julius, the Lupercal, the portico at the Flaminian circus, which I permitted to bear the name of the portico of Octavius after the man who erected the previous portico on the same site, a pulvinar at the Circus Maximus, (2) the temples on the Capitol of Jupiter Feretrius and Jupiter the Thunderer, the temple of Quirinus, the temples of Minerva and Queen Juno and Jupiter Libertas on the Aventine, the temple of the Lares at the top of the Sacred Way, the temple of the Di Penates in the Velia, the temple of Youth, and the temple of the Great Mother on the Palatine.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 2.76-2.77 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.76. Sed de hoc loco plura in aliis, nunc hactenus. Externa enim auguria, quae sunt non tam artificiosa quam superstitiosa, videamus. Omnibus fere avibus utuntur, nos admodum paucis; alia illis sinistra sunt, alia nostris. Solebat ex me Deiotarus percontari nostri augurii disciplinam, ego ex illo sui. Di immortales! quantum differebat! ut quaedam essent etiam contraria. Atque ille iis semper utebatur, nos, nisi dum a populo auspicia accepta habemus, quam multum iis utimur? Bellicam rem administrari maiores nostri nisi auspicato noluerunt; quam multi anni sunt, cum bella a proconsulibus et a propraetoribus administrantur 2.77. qui auspicia non habent! Itaque nec amnis transeunt auspicato nec tripudio auspicantur. Ubi ergo avium divinatio? quae, quoniam ab iis, qui auspicia nulla habent, bella administrantur, ad urbanas res retenta videtur, a bellicis esse sublata. Nam ex acuminibus quidem, quod totum auspicium militare est, iam M. Marcellus ille quinquiens consul totum omisit, idem imperator, idem augur optumus. Et quidem ille dicebat, si quando rem agere vellet, ne impediretur auspiciis, lectica operta facere iter se solere. Huic simile est, quod nos augures praecipimus, ne iuges auspicium obveniat, ut iumenta iubeant diiungere. 2.76. But we shall discuss the latter point at greater length in other discourses; let us dismiss it for the present.Now let us examine augury as practised among foreign nations, whose methods are not so artificial as they are superstitious. They employ almost all kinds of birds, we only a few; they regard some signs as favourable, we, others. Deiotarus used to question me a great deal about our system of augury, and I him about that of his country. Ye gods! how much they differed! So much that in some cases they were directly the reverse of each other. He employed auspices constantly, we never do except when the duty of doing so is imposed by a vote of the people. Our ancestors would not undertake any military enterprise without consulting the auspices; but now, for many years, our wars have been conducted by pro-consuls and pro-praetors, who do not have the right to take auspices. 2.77. Therefore they have no tripudium and they cross rivers without first taking the auspices. What, then, has become of divining by means of birds? It is not used by those who conduct our wars, for they have not the right of auspices. Since it has been withdrawn from use in the field I suppose it is reserved for city use only!As to divination ex acuminibus, which is altogether military, it was wholly ignored by that famous man, Marcus Marcellus, who was consul five times and, besides, was a commander-in‑chief, as well as a very fine augur. In fact, he used to say that, if he wished to execute some manoeuvre which he did not want interfered with by the auspices, he would travel in a closed litter. His method is of a kind with the advice which we augurs give, that the draught cattle be ordered to be unyoked so as to prevent a iuge auspicium.
2. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.9. Or are we to make light of the famous augural staff of Attus Navius, wherewith he marked out the vineyard into sections for the purpose of discovering the pig? I would agree that we might do so, had not King Hostilius fought great and glorious wars under the guidance of Attus's augury. But owing to the carelessness of our nobility the augural lore has been forgotten, and the reality of the auspices has fallen into contempt, only the outward show being retained; and in consequence highly important departments of public administration, and in particular the conduct of wars upon which the safety of the state depends, are carried on without any auspices at all; no taking of omens when crossing rivers, none when lights flash from the points of the javelins, none when men are called to arms (owing to which wills made on active service have gone out of existence, since our generals only enter on their military command when they have laid down their augural powers).
3. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.1.58 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Pro Archia, 27 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

27. Decimus quidem Brutus, summus vir et imperator, Acci, amicissimi sui, carminibus templorum ac monumentorum monu. eabpc : moni. cett. aditus exornavit suorum. iam vero ille qui cum Aetolis Ennio comite bellavit Fulvius non dubitavit Martis manubias Musis consecrare. qua re, in qua urbe imperatores prope armati poetarum nomen et Musarum delubra coluerunt, in ea non debent togati togati σχς, p mg. : locati cett. iudices a Musarum honore et a poetarum salute abhorrere.
5. Cicero, Pro Lege Manilia, 40 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

40. quae quae H : qua p : quali y : qualis cett. sit temperantia considerate. Vnde illam tantam celeritatem et tam incredibilem cursum inventum putatis? non enim illum eximia vis remigum aut ars inaudita quaedam guberdi aut venti aliqui novi tam celeriter in ultimas terras pertulerunt, sed eae eae hae Eb s res quae ceteros remorari solent non retardarunt. non avaritia ab instituto cursu ad praedam aliquam devocavit, non libido ad voluptatem, non amoenitas ad delectationem, non nobilitas urbis urbis nobilitas H ad cognitionem, non denique labor ipse ad quietem; postremo signa et tabulas ceteraque ornamenta Graecorum oppidorum quae ceteri tollenda esse arbitrantur, ea sibi ille ne visenda quidem existimavit.
6. Varro, On The Latin Language, 5.54 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 8.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Livy, History, 2.8.7-2.8.8, 2.27.5, 4.29.7, 9.46.6-9.46.7, 10.46.7, 38.43.5, 38.56, 45.16.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Ovid, Fasti, 2.58, 2.61, 2.63, 2.69 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.58. On the Kalends, are now, they are fallen with the lapse of time. 2.61. Under whose rule the shrines are untouched by age: 2.63. Pious one, you who build and repair the temples 2.69. At Numa’s sanctuary, and the Thunderer’s on the Capitol
10. Propertius, Elegies, 2.31 (1st cent. BCE

11. Sallust, Catiline, 10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12. Strabo, Geography, 5.3.7, 14.1.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.3.7. In the interior, the first city above Ostia is Rome; it is the only city built on the Tiber. It has been remarked above, that its position was fixed, not by choice, but necessity; to this must be added, that those who afterwards enlarged it, were not at liberty to select a better site, being prevented by what was already built. The first [kings] fortified the Capitol, the Palatium, and the Collis Quirinalis, which was so easy of access, that when Titus Tatius came to avenge the rape of the [Sabine] virgins, he took it on the first assault. Ancus Marcius, who added Mount Caelius and the Aventine Mount with the intermediate plain, separated as these places were both from each other and from what had been formerly fortified, was compelled to do this of necessity; since he did not consider it proper to leave outside his walls, heights so well protected by nature, to whomsoever might have a mind to fortify themselves upon them, while at the same time he was not capable of enclosing the whole as far as Mount Quirinus. Servius perceived this defect, and added the Esquiline and Viminal hills. As these were both of easy access from without, a deep trench was dug outside them and the earth thrown up on the inside, thus forming a terrace of 6 stadia in length along the inner side of the trench. This terrace he surmounted with a wall flanked with towers, and extending from the Colline to the Esquiline gate. Midway along the terrace is a third gate, named after the Viminal hill. Such is the Roman rampart, which seems to stand in need of other ramparts itself. But it seems to me that the first [founders] were of opinion, both in regard to themselves and their successors, that Romans had to depend not on fortifications, but on arms and their individual valour, both for safety and for wealth, and that walls were not a defence to men, but men were a defence to walls. At the period of its commencement, when the large and fertile districts surrounding the city belonged to others, and while it lay easily open to assault, there was nothing in its position which could be looked upon as favourable; but when by valour and labour these districts became its own, there succeeded a tide of prosperity surpassing the advantages of every other place. Thus, notwithstanding the prodigious increase of the city, there has been plenty of food, and also of wood and stone for ceaseless building, rendered necessary by the falling down of houses, and on account of conflagrations, and of the sales, which seem never to cease. These sales are a kind of voluntary falling down of houses, each owner knocking down and rebuilding one part or another, according to his individual taste. For these purposes the numerous quarries, the forests, and the rivers which convey the materials, offer wonderful facilities. of these rivers, the first is the Teverone, which flows from Alba, a city of the Latins near to the country of the Marsi, and from thence through the plain below this [city], till it unites with the Tiber. After this come the Nera (Nar) and the Timia, which passing through Ombrica fall into the Tiber, and the Chiana, which flows through Tyrrhenia and the territory of Clusiumn. Augustus Caesar endeavoured to avert from the city damages of the kind alluded to, and instituted a company of freedmen, who should be ready to lend their assistance in cases of conflagration; whilst, as a preventive against the falling of houses, he decreed that all new buildings should not be carried so high as formerly, and that those erected along the public ways should not exceed seventy feet in height. But these improvements must have ceased only for the facilities afforded by the quarries, the forests, and the ease of transport. 14.1.14. The distance from the Trogilian promontory to Samos is forty stadia. Samos faces the south, both it and its harbor, which latter has a naval station. The greater part of it is on level ground, being washed by the sea, but a part of it reaches up into the mountain that lies above it. Now on the right, as one sails towards the city, is the Poseidium, a promontory which with Mt. Mycale forms the seven-stadia strait; and it has a temple of Poseidon; and in front of it lies an isle called Narthecis; and on the left is the suburb near the Heraion, and also the Imbrasus River, and the Heraion, an ancient sanctuary and large temple, which is now a picture gallery. Apart from the number of the paintings placed inside, there are other picture galleries and some little temples [naiskoi] full of ancient art. And the area open to the sky is likewise full of most excellent statues. of these, three of colossal size, the work of Myron, stood upon one base; Antony took these statues away, but Augustus Caesar restored two of them, those of Athena and Heracles, to the same base, although he transferred the Zeus to the Capitolium, having erected there a small chapel for that statue.
13. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.378-1.379, 1.427-1.429 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.378. but empire without end. Yea, even my Queen 1.379. Juno, who now chastiseth land and sea 1.427. Then with no followers save his trusty friend 1.428. Achates, he went forth upon his way 1.429. two broad-tipped javelins poising in his hand.
14. Appian, Civil Wars, 5.130 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 14.72 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14.72. for Pompey went into it, and not a few of those that were with him also, and saw all that which it was unlawful for any other men to see but only for the high priests. There were in that temple the golden table, the holy candlestick, and the pouring vessels, and a great quantity of spices; and besides these there were among the treasures two thousand talents of sacred money: yet did Pompey touch nothing of all this, on account of his regard to religion; and in this point also he acted in a manner that was worthy of his virtue.
16. Juvenal, Satires, 3.183, 11.22, 14.86-14.91 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Martial, Epigrams, 1.108.3-1.108.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Martial, Epigrams, 1.108.3-1.108.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.213, 33.142, 35.58, 35.114, 36.42, 36.50 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Plutarch, Aemilius Paulus, 28.11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28.11. It was only the books of the king that he allowed his sons, who were devoted to learning, to choose out for themselves, and when he was distributing rewards for valour in the battle, he gave Aelius Tubero, his son-in-law, a bowl of five pounds weight.
21. Plutarch, Marius, 12.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Suetonius, Augustus, 28.3, 29.3-29.4, 31.4-31.5, 91.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Suetonius, Tiberius, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Tacitus, Annals, 15.38 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.38.  There followed a disaster, whether due to chance or to the malice of the sovereign is uncertain — for each version has its sponsors — but graver and more terrible than any other which has befallen this city by the ravages of fire. It took its rise in the part of the Circus touching the Palatine and Caelian Hills; where, among the shops packed with inflammable goods, the conflagration broke out, gathered strength in the same moment, and, impelled by the wind, swept the full length of the Circus: for there were neither mansions screened by boundary walls, nor temples surrounded by stone enclosures, nor obstructions of any description, to bar its progress. The flames, which in full career overran the level districts first, then shot up to the heights, and sank again to harry the lower parts, kept ahead of all remedial measures, the mischief travelling fast, and the town being an easy prey owing to the narrow, twisting lanes and formless streets typical of old Rome. In addition, shrieking and terrified women; fugitives stricken or immature in years; men consulting their own safety or the safety of others, as they dragged the infirm along or paused to wait for them, combined by their dilatoriness or their haste to impede everything. often, while they glanced back to the rear, they were attacked on the flanks or in front; or, if they had made their escape into a neighbouring quarter, that also was involved in the flames, and even districts which they had believed remote from danger were found to be in the same plight. At last, irresolute what to avoid or what to seek, they crowded into the roads or threw themselves down in the fields: some who had lost the whole of their means — their daily bread included — chose to die, though the way of escape was open, and were followed by others, through love for the relatives whom they had proved unable to rescue. None ventured to combat the fire, as there were reiterated threats from a large number of persons who forbade extinction, and others were openly throwing firebrands and shouting that "they had their authority" — possibly in order to have a freer hand in looting, possibly from orders received.
26. Tacitus, Histories, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.72.  This was the saddest and most shameful crime that the Roman state had ever suffered since its foundation. Rome had no foreign foe; the gods were ready to be propitious if our characters had allowed; and yet the home of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, founded after due auspices by our ancestors as a pledge of empire, which neither Porsenna, when the city gave itself up to him, nor the Gauls when they captured it, could violate — this was the shrine that the mad fury of emperors destroyed! The Capitol had indeed been burned before in civil war, but the crime was that of private individuals. Now it was openly besieged, openly burned — and what were the causes that led to arms? What was the price paid for this great disaster? This temple stood intact so long as we fought for our country. King Tarquinius Priscus had vowed it in the war with the Sabines and had laid its foundations rather to match his hope of future greatness than in accordance with what the fortunes of the Roman people, still moderate, could supply. Later the building was begun by Servius Tullius with the enthusiastic help of Rome's allies, and afterwards carried on by Tarquinius Superbus with the spoils taken from the enemy at the capture of Suessa Pometia. But the glory of completing the work was reserved for liberty: after the expulsion of the kings, Horatius Pulvillus in his second consulship dedicated it; and its magnificence was such that the enormous wealth of the Roman people acquired thereafter adorned rather than increased its splendour. The temple was built again on the same spot when after an interval of four hundred and fifteen years it had been burned in the consulship of Lucius Scipio and Gaius Norbanus. The victorious Sulla undertook the work, but still he did not dedicate it; that was the only thing that his good fortune was refused. Amid all the great works built by the Caesars the name of Lutatius Catulus kept its place down to Vitellius's day. This was the temple that then was burned.
27. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.45.3, 44.4.4, 49.43.8, 51.19.2, 53.2.4, 53.22.3, 54.35.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

43.45.3.  Another likeness they set up in the temple of Quirinus with the inscription, "To the Invincible God," and another on the Capitol beside the former kings of Rome. 44.4.4.  In addition to these remarkable privileges they named him father of his country, stamped this title on the coinage, voted to celebrate his birthday by public sacrifice, ordered that he should have a statue in the cities and in all the temples of Rome 49.43.8.  And after the Dalmatians had been utterly subjugated, he erected from the spoils thus gained the porticos and the libraries called the Octavian, after his sister. 51.19.2.  Moreover, they decreed that the foundation of the shrine of Julius should be adorned with the beaks of the captured ships and that a festival should be held every four years in honour of Octavius; that there should also be a thanksgiving on his birthday and on the anniversary of the announcement of his victory; also that when he should enter the city the Vestal Virgins and the senate and the people with their wives and children should go out to meet him. 53.2.4.  As for religious matters, he did not allow the Egyptian rites to be celebrated inside the pomerium, but made provision for the temples; those which had been built by private individuals he ordered their sons and descendants, if any survived, to repair, and the rest he restored himself. 53.22.3.  For I am unable to distinguish between the two funds, no matter how extensively Augustus coined into money silver statues of himself which had been set up by certain of his friends and by certain of the subject peoples, purposing thereby to make it appear that all the expenditures which he claimed to be making were from his own means. 54.35.2.  When the senate and the people once more contributed money for statues of Augustus, he would set up no statue of himself, but instead set up statues of Salus Publica, Concordia, and Pax. The citizens, it seems, were nearly always and on every pretext collecting money for this same object, and at last they ceased paying it privately, as one might call it, but would come to him on the very first day of the year and give, some more, some less, into his own hands;
28. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 1.11.3, 2.61.3, 2.81.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abbreviations, in calendars Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
aedicula Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
aedis Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
aemilius paullus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
aeneas, and the penates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
africa Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
agrippa, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
ancestors Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
antiphilus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
apollo, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48, 95, 97
apollo Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
architects Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
augury Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
augustan religious innovations Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
augustus, adorns capitoline Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus, and marc antony Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235, 292
augustus, and the palatine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus, and venus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48, 95, 97
augustus, builds and adorns temple of divus julius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus, column dedicated to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, equestrian statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, forum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
augustus, his marriage laws Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
augustus, his pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus, mausoleum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, moderation of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus, res gestae monumental text Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
augustus, restores public buildings Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus, statues to himself forbidden Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
augustus, victory at actium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
augustus Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19; Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138; Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
banquet Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
c. iulius caesar, birthday Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
calendars, marble Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
campus martius, augustan developments Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
capitol Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
carthage, virgilian Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
catulus, quintus lutatius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
cicero, marcus tullius Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
cicero, quintus Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
cicero (tullius cicero, m.) Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
circus, maximus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
concord, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
conquers sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
conspectus, value of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
construction, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
cornelius scipio africanus, p., forbids images to himself Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
cornelius scipio africanus, p., image in temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
cornelius scipio asiaticus , l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
cultural imaginary Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
culture, ancient mediterranean Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
de architectura, literariness and textuality Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
deity, temples to Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
delos Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
dining Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
dionysius of halicarnassus, on romes trojan origins Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
dioscuri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46, 161, 235
dius fidius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
economy, imperial Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
empire Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
epigraphy Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
eulogy Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
familia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
faustus sulla Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
favro, d. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
feast days Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
female spheres of activity Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
feriae, in the imperial period Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
festivals, ludi saeculares Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
flavius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
forum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95; Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
forum augustum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forum iulium Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
forums, imperial Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
fratres arvales Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
freedmen Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
galinsky, k. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
hegias Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46, 235
hellenistic architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
hera, her shrine at the imbrasus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
his villa at tusculum, defends verres Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
holidays Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
homo nouus Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
horatius, marcus pulvillus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
horti Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
inscriptions, in political process Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
italy, spoils distributed in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
iulius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
iuventas, jaeger, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
jerusalem, temple of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
julius caesar, c., and alexander the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
julius caesar, c., and cleopatra Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
julius caesar, c., and trojan ancestry Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
julius caesar, c., public collection in temple of venus genetrix Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
julius caesar, c., tomb inside the pomerium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
julius caesar, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48, 95, 97
juno, regina Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, feretrius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, libertas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter, tonans Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
jupiter Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, beginnings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, restorations Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
juvenal Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
lares Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161; Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
leochares Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46, 235
liberalitas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
libraries Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
livia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
love trysts, venues for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
maecenas, and propertius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
marius, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
mars avenger, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
martial, economic status of Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
martial Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
mater magna Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
mausoleum of augustus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
memoria posteris tradere formula Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
mercury, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
metellus macedonicus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
military Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
minerva Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
mithraeum Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
mithridates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
moderatio Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
modestia Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
monster, construction of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
mummius achaicus, l., sacks corinth Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
myron, works on capitoline Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
objects, their public versus private context Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48, 95
octavius, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
ostia Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
ovid Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
pantheon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
parks Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
patron and client relations Esler, The Early Christian World (2000) 19
patronage Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
patrons, and their clients Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
paupertas Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
pausius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
peace Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
penates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
perseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
pharnaces, king of pontus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
philip v of macedon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
philippi Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
piety, pietas, lack of pietas Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
polygnotus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
pompey, theatre of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
pompey the great, checks piracy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
pompey the great, his moderation concerning plunder Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
pompey the great, his triumph over mithridates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
portico of agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
portico of apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
portico of livia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48, 95
portico of octavius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
porticos Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95, 97
postumius, spurius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
princeps ciuilis Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
pulvinaria Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
quinctius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
quinctius flamininus, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
quirinus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
religious innovations, fratres arvales Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
renewal and renovation Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 69
res gestae divi augusti Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
rituals Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
romance, venues for Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
rome, ara pacis Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
rome, campus martius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
rome, capitoline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5, 292
rome, comitium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, curia hostilia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, esquiline hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
rome, forum of julius caesar, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
rome, forum of julius caesar Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
rome, forum romanum, and augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, forum romanum, verres adorns Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
rome, forum romanum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
rome, palatine hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
rome, popular venue for display Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
rome, portico of octavia, built with spoils of dalmatia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, portico of octavia, its library Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, rostrum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
rome, temple of divus julius, adorned with rostra from actium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of divus julius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, scipios statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
rome, temple of jupiter tonans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
rome, temple of the penates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
rome, temple of venus genetrix, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
rome, temple of vesta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
rome, theatre of balbus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
rome (city) Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
saepta iulia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
salus publica Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
santa maria maggiore Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
self-fashioning Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
self-restrained omnipotence Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
senate, and adulation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
senate, and people of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, bestows honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, ex senatus consulto Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
senate, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
senate Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126; Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 75
sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
spoils, private versus public use of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
statuary, imperial oversight of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
statuary, over-population of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
stratonice Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
synagogue Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 138
tarquin Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48, 95, 97
temple of, concord Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, dius fidius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of mars avenger Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 95
temple of mercury Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, as display expenditure Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, of apollo Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of di penates Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of divus julius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of juno sospita Erker, Ambiguity and Religion in Ovid’s Fasti: Religious Innovation and the Imperial Family (2023) 186
temples, of jupiter feretrius Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of jupiter libertas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of jupiter tonans Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of juventas Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of mars Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of minerva Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples, of quirinus Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
temples Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
theatre of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
theatres' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 97
tiber Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5
tiberius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
triumphator, garb worn by Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 292
trojans, and caesar Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
trojans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
tubero Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
tullius cicero, m., penates and Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
tullius cicero, m., praises pompeys moderation Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
tullius cicero, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
venus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
vergil Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 46
vesta, shrine on palatine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 5, 161
vesta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 161
vitellius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
war and temple building Rüpke, The Roman Calendar from Numa to Constantine Time, History and the Fasti (2011) 126
zanker, p. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235
zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 235