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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1632
Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 14


nanMy sons, Gaius and Lucius Caesar, of whom Fortune bereaved me in their youth, were for my honor designated as consuls by the senate and people of Rome when they were fourteen, with the provision that they should enter on that magistracy after the lapse of five years. And the senate decreed that from the day when they were led into the forum they should take part in the councils of state. 2 Furthermore each of them was presented with silver shields and spears by the whole body of equites Romani and hailed as princeps iuventutis.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, On Duties, 1.138-1.139 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.138. Et quoniam omnia persequimur, volumus quidem certe, dicendum est etiam, qualem hominis honorati et principis domum placeat esse, cuius finis est usus, ad quem accommodanda est aedificandi descriptio et tamen adhibenda commoditatis dignitatisque diligentia. Cn. Octavio, qui primus ex illa familia consul factus est, honori fuisse accepimus, quod praeclaram aedificasset in Palatio et plenam dignitatis domum; quae cum vulgo viseretur, suffragata domino, novo homini, ad consulatum putabatur; hanc Scaurus demolitus accessionem adiunxit aedibus. Itaque ille in suam domum consulatum primus attulit, hic, summi et clarissimi viri filius, in domum multiplicatam non repulsam solum rettulit, sed ignominiam etiam et calamitatem. 1.139. Orda enim est dignitas domo, non ex domo tota quaerenda, nec domo dominus, sed domino domus honestanda est, et, ut in ceteris habenda ratio non sua solum, sed etiam aliorum, sic in domo clari hominis, in quam et hospites multi recipiendi et admittenda hominum cuiusque modi multitudo, adhibenda cura est laxitatis; aliter ampla domus dedecori saepe domino fit, si est in ea solitudo, et maxime, si aliquando alio domino solita est frequentari. Odiosum est enim, cum a praetereuntibus dicitur: O domus ántiqua, heu quam dispari domináre domino! quod quidem his temporibus in multis licet dicere. 1.138.  But since I am investigating this subject in all its phases (at least, that is my purpose), I must discuss also what sort of house a man of rank and station should, in my opinion, have. Its prime object is serviceableness. To this the plan of the building should be adapted; and yet careful attention should be paid to its convenience and distinction. We have heard that Gnaeus Octavius — the first of that family to be elected consul — distinguished himself by building upon the Palatine an attractive and imposing house. Everybody went to see it, and it was thought to have gained votes for the owner, a new man, in his canvass for the consulship. That house Scaurus demolished, and on its site he built an addition to his own house. Octavius, then, was the first of his family to bring the honour of a consulship to his house; Scaurus, thought the son of a very great and illustrious man, brought to the same house, when enlarged, not only defeat, but disgrace and ruin. 1.139.  The truth is, a man's dignity may be enhanced by the house he lives in, but not wholly secured by it; the owner should bring honour to his house, not the house to its owner. And, as in everything else a man must have regard not for himself alone but for others also, so in the home of a distinguished man, in which numerous guests must be entertained and crowds of every sort of people received, care must be taken to have it spacious. But if it is not frequented by visitors, if it has an air of lonesomeness, a spacious palace often becomes a discredit to its owner. This is sure to be the case if at some other time, when it had a different owner, it used to be thronged. For it is unpleasant, when passers-by remark: "O good old house, alas! how different The owner who now owneth thee!" And in these times that may be said of many a house!
2. Cicero, Pro Murena, 52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

52. iam tum coniuratos cum gladiis in campum deduci a Catilina sciebam, descendi in campum cum firmissimo praesidio fortissimorum virorum et cum illa lata insignique lorica, non quae me tegeret — etenim sciebam Catilinam non latus aut ventrem sed caput et collum solere petere — verum ut omnes boni animadverterent et, cum in metu et periculo consulem viderent, id quod est factum factum est w, Halm, ad opem praesidiumque concurrerent. itaque cum te, Servi, remissiorem in petendo putarent, Catilinam et spe et cupiditate inflammatum viderent, omnes qui illam ab re publica pestem depellere cupiebant ad Murenam se statim contulerunt.
3. Ovid, Ars Amatoria, 1.181, 1.203-1.205, 1.213-1.214, 1.217-1.228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Plutarch, Brutus, 14.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.10.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

55.10.2.  . . . to Mars, and that he himself and his grandsons should go there as often as they wished, while those who were passing from the class of boys and were being enrolled among the youths of military age should invariably do so; that those who were sent out to commands abroad should make that their starting-point;


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
architects Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
augustus/octavian, constitutional status of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
brutus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
cassius, spurius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
catilinarian conspiracy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
clodius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
descending Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
despicere (looking down) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
entourage (turba) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
fulvius, flaccus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
houses, location of wealthy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
julius caesar, house of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
looking down (despicere) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
lucius caesar Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
manlius capitolinus, marcus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
marcellus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
marius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
militarism Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
movement in the city, descending Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
movement in the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
pompey (the great) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183
res publica, as a political/historical construct Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
temple, of mars ultor' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 179
turba (entourage) Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 183