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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1489
Augustine, On Genesis Against The Manichaeans, 2.21.32
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Augustine, Against Julian, 4.41 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

2. Augustine, On The Good of Marriage, 2.2 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

3. Augustine, The City of God, 14.17-14.20 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14.17. Justly is shame very specially connected with this lust; justly, too, these members themselves, being moved and restrained not at our will, but by a certain independent autocracy, so to speak, are called shameful. Their condition was different before sin. For as it is written, They were naked and were not ashamed, Genesis 2:25 - not that their nakedness was unknown to them, but because nakedness was not yet shameful, because not yet did lust move those members without the will's consent; not yet did the flesh by its disobedience testify against the disobedience of man. For they were not created blind, as the unenlightened vulgar fancy; for Adam saw the animals to whom he gave names, and of Eve we read, The woman saw that the tree was good for food, and that it was pleasant to the eyes. Genesis 3:6 Their eyes, therefore were open, but were not open to this, that is to say, were not observant so as to recognize what was conferred upon them by the garment of grace, for they had no consciousness of their members warring against their will. But when they were stripped of this grace, that their disobedience might be punished by fit retribution, there began in the movement of their bodily members a shameless novelty which made nakedness indecent: it at once made them observant and made them ashamed. And therefore, after they violated God's command by open transgression, it is written: And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons. Genesis 3:7 The eyes of them both were opened, not to see, for already they saw, but to discern between the good they had lost and the evil into which they had fallen. And therefore also the tree itself which they were forbidden to touch was called the tree of the knowledge of good and evil from this circumstance, that if they ate of it it would impart to them this knowledge. For the discomfort of sickness reveals the pleasure of health. They knew, therefore, that they were naked,- naked of that grace which prevented them from being ashamed of bodily nakedness while the law of sin offered no resistance to their mind. And thus they obtained a knowledge which they would have lived in blissful ignorance of, had they, in trustful obedience to God, declined to commit that offense which involved them in the experience of the hurtful effects of unfaithfulness and disobedience. And therefore, being ashamed of the disobedience of their own flesh, which witnessed to their disobedience while it punished it, they sewed fig leaves together, and made themselves aprons, that is, cinctures for their privy parts; for some interpreters have rendered the word by succinctoria. Campestria is, indeed, a Latin word, but it is used of the drawers or aprons used for a similar purpose by the young men who stripped for exercise in the campus; hence those who were so girt were commonly called campestrati. Shame modestly covered that which lust disobediently moved in opposition to the will, which was thus punished for its own disobedience. Consequently all nations, being propagated from that one stock, have so strong an instinct to cover the shameful parts, that some barbarians do not uncover them even in the bath, but wash with their drawers on. In the dark solitudes of India also, though some philosophers go naked, and are therefore called gymnosophists, yet they make an exception in the case of these members and cover them. 14.18. Lust requires for its consummation darkness and secrecy; and this not only when un lawful intercourse is desired, but even such fornication as the earthly city has legalized. Where there is no fear of punishment, these permitted pleasures still shrink from the public eye. Even where provision is made for this lust, secrecy also is provided; and while lust found it easy to remove the prohibitions of law, shamelessness found it impossible to lay aside the veil of retirement. For even shameless men call this shameful; and though they love the pleasure, dare not display it. What! Does not even conjugal intercourse, sanctioned as it is by law for the propagation of children, legitimate and honorable though it be, does it not seek retirement from every eye? Before the bridegroom fondles his bride, does he not exclude the attendants, and even the paranymphs, and such friends as the closest ties have admitted to the bridal chamber? The greatest master of Roman eloquence says, that all right actions wish to be set in the light, i.e., desire to be known. This right action, however, has such a desire to be known, that yet it blushes to be seen. Who does not know what passes between husband and wife that children may be born? Is it not for this purpose that wives are married with such ceremony? And yet, when this well-understood act is gone about for the procreation of children, not even the children themselves, who may already have been born to them, are suffered to be witnesses. This right action seeks the light, in so far as it seeks to be known, but yet dreads being seen. And why so, if not because that which is by nature fitting and decent is so done as to be accompanied with a shame-begetting penalty of sin? 14.19. Hence it is that even the philosophers who have approximated to the truth have avowed that anger and lust are vicious mental emotions, because, even when exercised towards objects which wisdom does not prohibit, they are moved in an ungoverned and inordinate manner, and consequently need the regulation of mind and reason. And they assert that this third part of the mind is posted as it were in a kind of citadel, to give rule to these other parts, so that, while it rules and they serve, man's righteousness is preserved without a breach. These parts, then, which they acknowledge to be vicious even in a wise and temperate man, so that the mind, by its composing and restraining influence, must bridle and recall them from those objects towards which they are unlawfully moved, and give them access to those which the law of wisdom sanctions - that anger, e.g., may be allowed for the enforcement of a just authority, and lust for the duty of propagating offspring - these parts, I say, were not vicious in Paradise before sin, for they were never moved in opposition to a holy will towards any object from which it was necessary that they should be withheld by the restraining bridle of reason. For though now they are moved in this way, and are regulated by a bridling and restraining power, which those who live temperately, justly, and godly exercise, sometimes with ease, and sometimes with greater difficulty, this is not the sound health of nature, but the weakness which results from sin. And how is it that shame does not hide the acts and words dictated by anger or other emotions, as it covers the motions of lust, unless because the members of the body which we employ for accomplishing them are moved, not by the emotions themselves, but by the authority of the consenting will? For he who in his anger rails at or even strikes some one, could not do so were not his tongue and hand moved by the authority of the will, as also they are moved when there is no anger. But the organs of generation are so subjected to the rule of lust, that they have no motion but what it communicates. It is this we are ashamed of; it is this which blushingly hides from the eyes of onlookers. And rather will a man endure a crowd of witnesses when he is unjustly venting his anger on some one, than the eye of one man when he innocently copulates with his wife. 14.20. It is this which those canine or cynic philosophers have overlooked, when they have, in violation of the modest instincts of men, boastfully proclaimed their unclean and shameless opinion, worthy indeed of dogs, viz., that as the matrimonial act is legitimate, no one should be ashamed to perform it openly, in the street or in any public place. Instinctive shame has overborne this wild fancy. For though it is related that Diogenes once dared to put his opinion in practice, under the impression that his sect would be all the more famous if his egregious shamelessness were deeply graven in the memory of mankind, yet this example was not afterwards followed. Shame had more influence with them, to make them blush before men, than error to make them affect a resemblance to dogs. And possibly, even in the case of Diogenes, and those who did imitate him, there was but an appearance and pretence of copulation, and not the reality. Even at this day there are still Cynic philosophers to be seen; for these are Cynics who are not content with being clad in the pallium, but also carry a club; yet no one of them dares to do this that we speak of. If they did, they would be spat upon, not to say stoned, by the mob. Human nature, then, is without doubt ashamed of this lust; and justly so, for the insubordination of these members, and their defiance of the will, are the clear testimony of the punishment of man's first sin. And it was fitting that this should appear specially in those parts by which is generated that nature which has been altered for the worse by that first and great sin - that sin from whose evil connection no one can escape, unless God's grace expiate in him individually that which was perpetrated to the destruction of all in common, when all were in one man, and which was avenged by God's justice.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; does sex require pleasure? Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
aquinas (thomas), animals and, after the fall, humans are inferior because neither can moderate lust by reason Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, anti-pelagianism Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, before the fall, no conflict of lust with will, first view, adam and eve had only spiritual bodies Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, but augustine accepts that since we have only the gift of moderation, god blames only excess Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, effect of music on lust shows lust is not under control of the will Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, lust Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, lust disobedient to will was not cause of fall, but a fit punishment for man Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, lust in animals all right because they have no reason for lust to rebel against Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, second view, bodies usable for sex without lust or pleasure but unused Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, third view, if there was lust and pleasure, it did not oppose will Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
augustine, this in turn explains shame at sex and need for privacy Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
fall, the' Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 663
logos, christ as Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 663
lust, augustine's main objection that lust and male member not subject to will" Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
lust, lust and pleasure not necessary for sex in clement of alexandria and augustine Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
lust, relation to will Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
manichaeism Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 663
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; does sex require pleasure? Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
paradise Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 663
platonism Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 663
schmitt, émile Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
sex, not depend on lust and pleasure? Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
sex, sex in public and shame Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
shame at sex, evolutionary, versus lapsarian explanations Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
speusippus, platonist, lust excludes thought Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
temptation Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406
wisdom Ramelli, The Christian Doctrine of Apokatastasis: A Critical Assessment from the New Testament to Eriugena (2013) 663
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 406