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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1507
Augustine, De Nuptiis Et Concupiscentia, 1.35


nanBut we have in the apostle's own language, a little before, a sufficiently clear proof that he might have meant his flesh when he said, Bringing me into captivity. For after declaring, I know that in me dwells no good thing, he at once added an explanatory sentence to this effect, That is, in my flesh. Romans 7:18 It is then the flesh, in which there dwells nothing good, that is brought into captivity to the law of sin. Now he designates that as the flesh wherein lies a certain morbid carnal affection, not the mere conformation of our bodily fabric whose members are not to be used as weapons for sin- that is, for that very concupiscence which holds this flesh of ours captive. So far, indeed, as concerns this actual bodily substance and nature of ours, it is already God's temple in all faithful men, whether living in marriage or in continence. If, however, absolutely nothing of our flesh were in captivity, not even to the devil, because there has accrued to it the remission of sin, that sin be not imputed to it (and this is properly designated the law of sin); yet if under this law of sin, that is, under its own concupiscence, our flesh were not to some degree held captive, how could that be true which the apostle states, when he speaks of our waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body? Romans 8:23 In so far, then, as there is now this waiting for the redemption of our body, there is also in some degree still existing something in us which is a captive to the law of sin. Accordingly he exclaims, O wretched man that I am! Who shall deliver me from the body of this death? The grace of God, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Romans 7:24 What are we to understand by such language, but that our body, which is undergoing corruption, weighs heavily on our soul? When, therefore, this very body of ours shall be restored to us in an incorrupt state, there shall be a full liberation from the body of this death; but there will be no such deliverance for them who shall rise again to condemnation. To the body of this death then is understood to be owing the circumstance that there is in our members another law which wars against the law of the mind, so long as the flesh lusts against the spirit - without, however, subjugating the mind, inasmuch as on its side, too, the spirit has a concupiscence contrary to the flesh. Galatians 5:17 Thus, although the actual law of sin partly holds the flesh in captivity (whence comes its resistance to the law of the mind), still it has not an absolute empire in our body, notwithstanding its mortal state, since it refuses obedience to its desires. Romans 6:12 For in the case of hostile armies between whom there is an earnest conflict, even the side which is inferior in the fight usually holds a something which it has captured; and although in some such way there is somewhat in our flesh which is kept under the law of sin, yet it has before it the hope of redemption: and then there will remain not a particle of this corrupt concupiscence; but our flesh, healed of that diseased plague, and wholly clad in immortality, shall live for evermore in eternal blessedness.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. New Testament, Romans, 7.7-7.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7.7. What shall we say then? Is the law sin? May it never be! However, I wouldn't have known sin, except through the law. For I wouldn't have known coveting, unless the law had said, "You shall not covet. 7.8. But sin, finding occasion through the commandment, produced in me all kinds of coveting. For apart from the law, sin is dead. 7.9. I was alive apart from the law once, but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died. 7.10. The commandment, which was for life, this I found to be for death; 7.11. for sin, finding occasion through the commandment, deceived me, and through it killed me. 7.12. Therefore the law indeed is holy, and the commandment holy, and righteous, and good. 7.13. Did then that which is good become death to me? May it never be! But sin, that it might be shown to be sin, by working death to me through that which is good; that through the commandment sin might become exceeding sinful. 7.14. For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am fleshly, sold under sin. 7.15. For I don't know what I am doing. For I don't practice what I desire to do; but what I hate, that I do. 7.16. But if what I don't desire, that I do, I consent to the law that it is good. 7.17. So now it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me. 7.18. For I know that in me, that is, in my flesh, dwells no good thing. For desire is present with me, but I don't find it doing that which is good. 7.19. For the good which I desire, I don't do; but the evil which I don't desire, that I practice. 7.20. But if what I don't desire, that I do, it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me. 7.21. I find then the law, that, to me, while I desire to do good, evil is present. 7.22. For I delight in God's law after the inward man 7.23. but I see a different law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity under the law of sin which is in my members. 7.24. What a wretched man I am! Who will deliver me out of the body of this death? 7.25. I thank God through Jesus Christ, our Lord! So then with the mind, I myself serve God's law, but with the flesh, the sin's law.
2. Augustine, De Peccatorum Meritis Et Remissione Et De Baptismo Parvulorum, 2.15-2.17 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
akrasia Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
apostle paul Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 491
augustine Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 491
baptism Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
concupiscentia, concupiscence Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 491
consent Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 316
daily prayer Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
domestication of concupiscence Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
grace Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
interpretation of romans Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 316, 317
julian of aeclanum Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
manichaeism, augustines residue of Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
marcellinus Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 491
rome Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
strong-willed (enkratic) persons Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317
sub lege – sub gratia' Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 491
works of love Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 317