Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1476
Augustine, De Diversis Quaestionibus Ad Simplicianum, 66.5
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. New Testament, Romans, 3.20, 3.22, 3.24, 3.27, 4.5, 5.12-5.21, 7.7-7.25, 8.30, 9.10-9.29, 11.33-11.36 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.20. Because by the works of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the law comes the knowledge of sin. 3.22. even the righteousness of God through faith in Jesus Christ to all and on all those who believe. For there is no distinction 3.24. being justified freely by his grace through the redemption that is in Christ Jesus; 3.27. Where then is the boasting? It is excluded. By what manner of law? of works? No, but by a law of faith. 4.5. But to him who doesn't work, but believes in him who justifies the ungodly, his faith is accounted for righteousness. 5.12. Therefore, as sin entered into the world through one man, and death through sin; and so death passed to all men, because all sinned. 5.13. For until the law, sin was in the world; but sin is not charged when there is no law. 5.14. Nevertheless death reigned from Adam until Moses, even over those whose sins weren't like Adam's disobedience, who is a foreshadowing of him who was to come. 5.15. But the free gift isn't like the trespass. For if by the trespass of the one the many died, much more did the grace of God, and the gift by the grace of the one man, Jesus Christ, abound to the many. 5.16. The gift is not as through one who sinned: for the judgment came by one to condemnation, but the free gift came of many trespasses to justification. 5.17. For if by the trespass of the one, death reigned through the one; so much more will those who receive the abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness reign in life through the one, Jesus Christ. 5.18. So then as through one trespass, all men were condemned; even so through one act of righteousness, all men were justified to life. 5.19. For as through the one man's disobedience many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the one will many be made righteous. 5.20. The law came in besides, that the trespass might abound; but where sin abounded, grace did abound more exceedingly; 5.21. that as sin reigned in death, even so might grace reign through righteousness to eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord. 7.7. What shall we say then? Is the law sin? May it never be! However, I wouldn't have known sin, except through the law. For I wouldn't have known coveting, unless the law had said, "You shall not covet. 7.8. But sin, finding occasion through the commandment, produced in me all kinds of coveting. For apart from the law, sin is dead. 7.9. I was alive apart from the law once, but when the commandment came, sin revived, and I died. 7.10. The commandment, which was for life, this I found to be for death; 7.11. for sin, finding occasion through the commandment, deceived me, and through it killed me. 7.12. Therefore the law indeed is holy, and the commandment holy, and righteous, and good. 7.13. Did then that which is good become death to me? May it never be! But sin, that it might be shown to be sin, by working death to me through that which is good; that through the commandment sin might become exceeding sinful. 7.14. For we know that the law is spiritual, but I am fleshly, sold under sin. 7.15. For I don't know what I am doing. For I don't practice what I desire to do; but what I hate, that I do. 7.16. But if what I don't desire, that I do, I consent to the law that it is good. 7.17. So now it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me. 7.18. For I know that in me, that is, in my flesh, dwells no good thing. For desire is present with me, but I don't find it doing that which is good. 7.19. For the good which I desire, I don't do; but the evil which I don't desire, that I practice. 7.20. But if what I don't desire, that I do, it is no more I that do it, but sin which dwells in me. 7.21. I find then the law, that, to me, while I desire to do good, evil is present. 7.22. For I delight in God's law after the inward man 7.23. but I see a different law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity under the law of sin which is in my members. 7.24. What a wretched man I am! Who will deliver me out of the body of this death? 7.25. I thank God through Jesus Christ, our Lord! So then with the mind, I myself serve God's law, but with the flesh, the sin's law. 8.30. Whom he predestined, those he also called. Whom he called, those he also justified. Whom he justified, those he also glorified. 9.10. Not only so, but Rebecca also conceived by one, by our father Isaac. 9.11. For being not yet born, neither having done anything good or bad, that the purpose of God according to election might stand, not of works, but of him who calls 9.12. it was said to her, "The elder will serve the younger. 9.13. Even as it is written, "Jacob I loved, but Esau I hated. 9.14. What shall we say then? Is there unrighteousness with God? May it never be! 9.15. For he said to Moses, "I will have mercy on whom I have mercy, and I will have compassion on whom I have compassion. 9.16. So then it is not of him who wills, nor of him who runs, but of God who has mercy. 9.17. For the Scripture says to Pharaoh, "For this very purpose I caused you to be raised up, that I might show in you my power, and that my name might be published abroad in all the earth. 9.18. So then, he has mercy on whom he desires, and he hardens whom he desires. 9.19. You will say then to me, "Why does he still find fault? For who withstands his will? 9.20. But indeed, O man, who are you to reply against God? Will the thing formed ask him who formed it, "Why did you make me like this? 9.21. Or hasn't the potter a right over the clay, from the same lump to make one part a vessel for honor, and another for dishonor? 9.22. What if God, willing to show his wrath, and to make his power known, endured with much patience vessels of wrath made for destruction 9.23. and that he might make known the riches of his glory on vessels of mercy, which he prepared beforehand for glory 9.24. us, whom he also called, not from the Jews only, but also from the Gentiles? 9.25. As he says also in Hosea, "I will call them 'my people,' which were not my people; And her 'beloved,' who was not beloved. 9.26. It will be that in the place where it was said to them, 'You are not my people,' There they will be called 'sons of the living God.' 9.27. Isaiah cries concerning Israel, "If the number of the children of Israel are as the sand of the sea, It is the remt who will be saved; 9.28. For He will finish the work and cut it short in righteousness, Because the LORD will make a short work upon the earth. 9.29. As Isaiah has said before, "Unless the Lord of Hosts had left us a seed, We would have become like Sodom, And would have been made like Gomorrah. 11.33. Oh the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and the knowledge of God! How unsearchable are his judgments, and his ways past tracing out! 11.34. For who has known the mind of the Lord? Or who has been his counselor? 11.35. Or who has first given to him, And it will be repaid to him again? 11.36. For of him, and through him, and to him, are all things. To him be the glory for ever! Amen.
2. Augustine, Against Julian, 1.48, 5.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

3. Augustine, De Diversis Quaestionibus Ad Simplicianum, 1.2, 66.1 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

4. Augustine, De Peccatorum Meritis Et Remissione Et De Baptismo Parvulorum, 1.9-1.10, 1.13-1.15, 1.19 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

5. Augustine, De Praedestinatione Sanctorum., 11 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

6. Augustine, The City of God, 14.21-14.24 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14.21. Far be it, then, from us to suppose that our first parents in Paradise felt that lust which caused them afterwards to blush and hide their nakedness, or that by its means they should have fulfilled the benediction of God, Increase and multiply and replenish the earth; Genesis 1:28 for it was after sin that lust began. It was after sin that our nature, having lost the power it had over the whole body, but not having lost all shame, perceived, noticed, blushed at, and covered it. But that blessing upon marriage, which encouraged them to increase and multiply and replenish the earth, though it continued even after they had sinned, was yet given before they sinned, in order that the procreation of children might be recognized as part of the glory of marriage, and not of the punishment of sin. But now, men being ignorant of the blessedness of Paradise, suppose that children could not have been begotten there in any other way than they know them to be begotten now, i.e., by lust, at which even honorable marriage blushes; some not simply rejecting, but sceptically deriding the divine Scriptures, in which we read that our first parents, after they sinned, were ashamed of their nakedness, and covered it; while others, though they accept and honor Scripture, yet conceive that this expression, Increase and multiply, refers not to carnal fecundity, because a similar expression is used of the soul in the words, You will multiply me with strength in my soul; and so, too, in the words which follow in Genesis, And replenish the earth, and subdue it, they understand by the earth the body which the soul fills with its presence, and which it rules over when it is multiplied in strength. And they hold that children could no more then than now be begotten without lust, which, after sin, was kindled, observed, blushed for, and covered; and even that children would not have been born in Paradise, but only outside of it, as in fact it turned out. For it was after they were expelled from it that they came together to beget children, and begot them. 14.22. But we, for our part, have no manner of doubt that to increase and multiply and replenish the earth in virtue of the blessing of God, is a gift of marriage as God instituted it from the beginning before man sinned, when He created them male and female - in other words, two sexes manifestly distinct. And it was this work of God on which His blessing was pronounced. For no sooner had Scripture said, Male and female created He them, Genesis 1:27-28 than it immediately continues, And God blessed them, and God said to them, Increase, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and subdue it, etc. And though all these things may not unsuitably be interpreted in a spiritual sense, yet male and female cannot be understood of two things in one man, as if there were in him one thing which rules, another which is ruled; but it is quite clear that they were created male and female, with bodies of different sexes, for the very purpose of begetting offspring, and so increasing, multiplying, and replenishing the earth; and it is great folly to oppose so plain a fact. It was not of the spirit which commands and the body which obeys, nor of the rational soul which rules and the irrational desire which is ruled, nor of the contemplative virtue which is supreme and the active which is subject, nor of the understanding of the mind and the sense of the body, but plainly of the matrimonial union by which the sexes are mutually bound together, that our Lord, when asked whether it were lawful for any cause to put away one's wife (for on account of the hardness of the hearts of the Israelites Moses permitted a bill of divorcement to be given), answered and said, Have you not read that He which made them at the beginning made them male and female, and said, For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife, and they two shall be one flesh? Wherefore they are no more two, but one flesh. What, therefore, God has joined together, let not man put asunder. Matthew 19:4-5 It is certain, then, that from the first men were created, as we see and know them to be now, of two sexes, male and female, and that they are called one, either on account of the matrimonial union, or on account of the origin of the woman, who was created from the side of the man. And it is by this original example, which God Himself instituted, that the apostle admonishes all husbands to love their own wives in particular. Ephesians 5:25 14.23. But he who says that there should have been neither copulation nor generation but for sin, virtually says that man's sin was necessary to complete the number of the saints. For if these two by not sinning should have continued to live alone, because, as is supposed, they could not have begotten children had they not sinned, then certainly sin was necessary in order that there might be not only two but many righteous men. And if this cannot be maintained without absurdity, we must rather believe that the number of the saints fit to complete this most blessed city would have been as great though no one had sinned, as it is now that the grace of God gathers its citizens out of the multitude of sinners, so long as the children of this world generate and are generated. Luke 20:34 And therefore that marriage, worthy of the happiness of Paradise, should have had desirable fruit without the shame of lust, had there been no sin. But how that could be, there is now no example to teach us. Nevertheless, it ought not to seem incredible that one member might serve the will without lust then, since so many serve it now. Do we now move our feet and hands when we will to do the things we would by means of these members? Do we meet with no resistance in them, but perceive that they are ready servants of the will, both in our own case and in that of others, and especially of artisans employed in mechanical operations, by which the weakness and clumsiness of nature become, through industrious exercise, wonderfully dexterous? And shall we not believe that, like as all those members obediently serve the will, so also should the members have discharged the function of generation, though lust, the award of disobedience, had been awanting? Did not Cicero, in discussing the difference of governments in his De Republica, adopt a simile from human nature, and say that we command our bodily members as children, they are so obedient; but that the vicious parts of the soul must be treated as slaves, and be coerced with a more stringent authority? And no doubt, in the order of nature, the soul is more excellent than the body; and yet the soul commands the body more easily than itself. Nevertheless this lust, of which we at present speak, is the more shameful on this account, because the soul is therein neither master of itself, so as not to lust at all, nor of the body, so as to keep the members under the control of the will; for if they were thus ruled, there should be no shame. But now the soul is ashamed that the body, which by nature is inferior and subject to it, should resist its authority. For in the resistance experienced by the soul in the other emotions there is less shame, because the resistance is from itself, and thus, when it is conquered by itself, itself is the conqueror, although the conquest is inordinate and vicious, because accomplished by those parts of the soul which ought to be subject to reason, yet, being accomplished by its own parts and energies, the conquest is, as I say, its own. For when the soul conquers itself to a due subordination, so that its unreasonable motions are controlled by reason, while it again is subject to God, this is a conquest virtuous and praiseworthy. Yet there is less shame when the soul is resisted by its own vicious parts than when its will and order are resisted by the body, which is distinct from and inferior to it, and dependent on it for life itself. But so long as the will retains under its authority the other members, without which the members excited by lust to resist the will cannot accomplish what they seek, chastity is preserved, and the delight of sin foregone. And certainly, had not culpable disobedience been visited with penal disobedience, the marriage of Paradise should have been ignorant of this struggle and rebellion, this quarrel between will and lust, that the will may be satisfied and lust restrained, but those members, like all the rest, should have obeyed the will. The field of generation should have been sown by the organ created for this purpose, as the earth is sown by the hand. And whereas now, as we essay to investigate this subject more exactly, modesty hinders us, and compels us to ask pardon of chaste ears, there would have been no cause to do so, but we could have discoursed freely, and without fear of seeming obscene, upon all those points which occur to one who meditates on the subject. There would not have been even words which could be called obscene, but all that might be said of these members would have been as pure as what is said of the other parts of the body. Whoever, then, comes to the perusal of these pages with unchaste mind, let him blame his disposition, not his nature; let him brand the actings of his own impurity, not the words which necessity forces us to use, and for which every pure and pious reader or hearer will very readily pardon me, while I expose the folly of that scepticism which argues solely on the ground of its own experience, and has no faith in anything beyond. He who is not scandalized at the apostle's censure of the horrible wickedness of the women who changed the natural use into that which is against nature, Romans 1:26 will read all this without being shocked, especially as we are not, like Paul, citing and censuring a damnable uncleanness, but are explaining, so far as we can, human generation, while with Paul we avoid all obscenity of language. 14.24. The man, then, would have sown the seed, and the woman received it, as need required, the generative organs being moved by the will, not excited by lust. For we move at will not only those members which are furnished with joints of solid bone, as the hands, feet, and fingers, but we move also at will those which are composed of slack and soft nerves: we can put them in motion, or stretch them out, or bend and twist them, or contract and stiffen them, as we do with the muscles of the mouth and face. The lungs, which are the very tenderest of the viscera except the brain, and are therefore carefully sheltered in the cavity of the chest, yet for all purposes of inhaling and exhaling the breath, and of uttering and modulating the voice, are obedient to the will when we breathe, exhale, speak, shout, or sing, just as the bellows obey the smith or the organist. I will not press the fact that some animals have a natural power to move a single spot of the skin with which their whole body is covered, if they have felt on it anything they wish to drive off - a power so great, that by this shivering tremor of the skin they can not only shake off flies that have settled on them, but even spears that have fixed in their flesh. Man, it is true, has not this power; but is this any reason for supposing that God could not give it to such creatures as He wished to possess it? And therefore man himself also might very well have enjoyed absolute power over his members had he not forfeited it by his disobedience; for it was not difficult for God to form him so that what is now moved in his body only by lust should have been moved only at will. We know, too, that some men are differently constituted from others, and have some rare and remarkable faculty of doing with their body what other men can by no effort do, and, indeed, scarcely believe when they hear of others doing. There are persons who can move their ears, either one at a time, or both together. There are some who, without moving the head, can bring the hair down upon the forehead, and move the whole scalp backwards and forwards at pleasure. Some, by lightly pressing their stomach, bring up an incredible quantity and variety of things they have swallowed, and produce whatever they please, quite whole, as if out of a bag. Some so accurately mimic the voices of birds and beasts and other men, that, unless they are seen, the difference cannot be told. Some have such command of their bowels, that they can break wind continuously at pleasure, so as to produce the effect of singing. I myself have known a man who was accustomed to sweat whenever he wished. It is well known that some weep when they please, and shed a flood of tears. But far more incredible is that which some of our brethren saw quite recently. There was a presbyter called Restitutus, in the parish of the Calamensian Church, who, as often as he pleased (and he was asked to do this by those who desired to witness so remarkable a phenomenon), on some one imitating the wailings of mourners, became so insensible, and lay in a state so like death, that not only had he no feeling when they pinched and pricked him, but even when fire was applied to him, and he was burned by it, he had no sense of pain except afterwards from the wound. And that his body remained motionless, not by reason of his self-command, but because he was insensible, was proved by the fact that he breathed no more than a dead man; and yet he said that, when any one spoke with more than ordinary distinctness, he heard the voice, but as if it were a long way off. Seeing, then, that even in this mortal and miserable life the body serves some men by many remarkable movements and moods beyond the ordinary course of nature, what reason is there for doubting that, before man was involved by his sin in this weak and corruptible condition, his members might have served his will for the propagation of offspring without lust? Man has been given over to himself because he abandoned God, while he sought to be self-satisfying; and disobeying God, he could not obey even himself. Hence it is that he is involved in the obvious misery of being unable to live as he wishes. For if he lived as he wished, he would think himself blessed; but he could not be so if he lived wickedly.
7. Jerome, Letters, 133 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

8. Jerome, Letters, 133 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

9. Jerome, Letters, 133 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adam-christ typology Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437
adam Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 160, 162; Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
apostle paul Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437, 488
asyndeton Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
augustine Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437, 488
baptism(al) Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 155, 160, 162
benedictio Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
bonum Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
caelestius Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160, 162
children Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
church Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
condemnation Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 162
corpus Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
death Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
donatists Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 155, 160, 162
emotions (passio, perturbatio) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 272
erubesco Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
eve Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
fall, of the soul Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161
genitals Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
glory Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
guilt) Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159
guilt) , inherited guilt Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159
habit (consuetudo, hexis) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 273
hilary of syracuse Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
incarnation of the soul) Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161
increase and multiply command' Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
innocent i Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 162
iustitia, justice Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437
iustus, iustitia Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
jerome Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 161
julian of eclanum Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159
knowledge Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 162
law Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 272
law , of moses Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
lex operum / factorum Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437
libido Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
lust Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
marcellinus Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437, 488; Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160, 162
marius mercator Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159
marriage Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
membrum Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
mors, mortalis Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
mortality Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 162
natura Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
origen Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161
orosius Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
paul (the apostle) Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
paulinus of milan Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
paulsego Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 272
peccatum Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
pelagians Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161, 162
pelagius Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 160, 161, 162
per fidem iesu christi Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437
pleasure (uoluptas, delectatio) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 272
procreation Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159
pudicitia/pudicus Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
resurrection Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
rufinus of aquileia Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161
rufinus the syrian Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161
sex, sexuality Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
shame Trettel, Desires in Paradise: An Interpretative Study of Augustine's City of God 14 (2019) 166
sin, peccatum, adams sin Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160
sin, peccatum, inherited sin Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161
sinless(ness) Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 160, 161, 162
soul, pre-existence / origin of the individual souls Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159, 161
stoicism, stoics Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 161
sub lege – sub gratia Cheuk-Yin Yam, Trinity and Grace in Augustine (2019) 437, 488
theodore of mopsuestia Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 159
valerius (comes) Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 162
voluntas, will Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162
zosimus Karfíková, Grace and the Will According to Augustine (2012) 162