Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1294
Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 2.37
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 901-903, 182 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

182. And of it shaped a sickle, then relayed
2. Homer, Iliad, 2.233, 3.156-3.157, 3.410-3.412, 6.351 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.233. /which some man of the horse-taming Trojans shall bring thee out of Ilios as a ransom for his son, whom I haply have bound and led away or some other of the Achaeans? Or is it some young girl for thee to know in love, whom thou wilt keep apart for thyself? Nay, it beseemeth not one that is their captain to bring to ill the sons of the Achaeans. 3.156. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships 3.157. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships 3.410. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.411. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 3.412. /But thither will I not go—it were a shameful thing—to array that man's couch; all the women of Troy will blame me hereafter; and I have measureless griefs at heart. Then stirred to wrath fair Aphrodite spake to her:Provoke me not, rash woman, lest I wax wroth and desert thee 6.351. /would that I had been wife to a better man, that could feel the indignation of his fellows and their many revilings. But this man's understanding is not now stable, nor ever will be hereafter; thereof I deem that he will e'en reap the fruit. But come now, enter in, and sit thee upon this chair
3. Solon, Fragments, 4 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

4. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Medea, 1390, 1389 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1389. The curse of our sons’ avenging spirit and of Justice
6. Herodotus, Histories, 2.51 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.51. These customs, then, and others besides, which I shall indicate, were taken by the Greeks from the Egyptians. It was not so with the ithyphallic images of Hermes; the production of these came from the Pelasgians, from whom the Athenians were the first Greeks to take it, and then handed it on to others. ,For the Athenians were then already counted as Greeks when the Pelasgians came to live in the land with them and thereby began to be considered as Greeks. Whoever has been initiated into the rites of the Cabeiri, which the Samothracians learned from the Pelasgians and now practice, understands what my meaning is. ,Samothrace was formerly inhabited by those Pelasgians who came to live among the Athenians, and it is from them that the Samothracians take their rites. ,The Athenians, then, were the first Greeks to make ithyphallic images of Hermes, and they did this because the Pelasgians taught them. The Pelasgians told a certain sacred tale about this, which is set forth in the Samothracian mysteries.
7. Sophocles, Ajax, 1390 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.27, 6.28.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.28.1. Information was given accordingly by some resident aliens and body servants, not about the Hermae but about some previous mutilations of other images perpetrated by young men in a drunken frolic, and of mock celebrations of the mysteries, averred to take place in private houses.
9. Demosthenes, Orations, 19.255 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Cicero, On Divination, 2.85 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.85. Sortes restant et Chaldaei, ut ad vates veniamus et ad somnia. Dicendum igitur putas de sortibus? Quid enim sors est? Idem prope modum, quod micare, quod talos iacere, quod tesseras, quibus in rebus temeritas et casus, non ratio nec consilium valet. Tota res est inventa fallaciis aut ad quaestum aut ad superstitionem aut ad errorem. Atque ut in haruspicina fecimus, sic videamus, clarissumarum sortium quae tradatur inventio. Numerium Suffustium Praenestinorum monumenta declarant, honestum hominem et nobilem, somniis crebris, ad extremum etiam minacibus cum iuberetur certo in loco silicem caedere, perterritum visis irridentibus suis civibus id agere coepisse; itaque perfracto saxo sortis erupisse in robore insculptas priscarum litterarum notis. Is est hodie locus saeptus religiose propter Iovis pueri, qui lactens cum Iunone Fortunae in gremio sedens mammam adpetens castissime colitur a matribus. 2.85. And pray what is the need, do you think, to talk about the casting of lots? It is much like playing at morra, dice, or knuckle-bones, in which recklessness and luck prevail rather than reflection and judgement. The whole scheme of divination by lots was fraudulently contrived from mercenary motives, or as a means of encouraging superstition and error. But let us follow the method used in the discussion of soothsaying and consider the traditional origin of the most famous lots. According to the annals of Praeneste Numerius Suffustius, who was a distinguished man of noble birth, was admonished by dreams, often repeated, and finally even by threats, to split open a flint rock which was lying in a designated place. Frightened by the visions and disregarding the jeers of his fellow-townsmen he set about doing as he had been directed. And so when he had broken open the stone, the lots sprang forth carved on oak, in ancient characters. The site where the stone was found is religiously guarded to this day. It is hard by the statue of the infant Jupiter, who is represented as sitting with Juno in the lap of Fortune and reaching for her breast, and it is held in the highest reverence by mothers.
11. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.49.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.49.5.  Now the details of the initiatory rite are guarded among the matters not to be divulged and are communicated to the initiates alone; but the fame has travelled wide of how these gods appear to mankind and bring unexpected aid to those initiates of theirs who call upon them in the midst of perils.
12. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.383 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 1.1.2, 1.1.4, 1.2.1, 1.2.3-1.2.5, 1.2.9, 1.2.11, 1.2.41, 1.5.4, 1.6-1.7, 1.6.1-1.6.9, 2.33-2.36, 2.34.3, 2.38-2.39, 2.69, 2.69.1-2.69.3, 4.2.82-4.2.95, 4.3, 4.59.3-4.59.4, 4.71-4.72, 4.71.2, 5.3, 5.30, 5.58, 5.66, 5.71, 5.82 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. New Testament, Luke, 9.62 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.62. But Jesus said to him, "No one, having put his hand to the plow, and looking back, is fit for the Kingdom of God.
15. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 34.28 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Hermas, Mandates, 11.5-11.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Lucian, Amores, 16, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.1.3, 1.19.2, 1.24.3, 2.3.4, 2.10.7, 2.34.11, 3.16.11, 4.33.3, 6.25.1, 7.6.6, 7.22.2, 7.27.1, 8.31.7, 8.32.1, 8.39.6, 10.12.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1.3. The most noteworthy sight in the Peiraeus is a precinct of Athena and Zeus. Both their images are of bronze; Zeus holds a staff and a Victory, Athena a spear. Here is a portrait of Leosthenes and of his sons, painted by Arcesilaus. This Leosthenes at the head of the Athenians and the united Greeks defeated the Macedonians in Boeotia and again outside Thermopylae forced them into Lamia over against Oeta, and shut them up there. 323 B.C. The portrait is in the long portico, where stands a market-place for those living near the sea—those farther away from the harbor have another—but behind the portico near the sea stand a Zeus and a Demos, the work of Leochares. And by the sea Conon fl. c. 350 B.C. built a sanctuary of Aphrodite, after he had crushed the Lacedaemonian warships off Cnidus in the Carian peninsula. 394 B.C. For the Cnidians hold Aphrodite in very great honor, and they have sanctuaries of the goddess; the oldest is to her as Doritis ( Bountiful ), the next in age as Acraea ( of the Height ), while the newest is to the Aphrodite called Cnidian by men generally, but Euploia ( Fair Voyage ) by the Cnidians themselves. 1.19.2. Concerning the district called The Gardens, and the temple of Aphrodite, there is no story that is told by them, nor yet about the Aphrodite which stands near the temple. Now the shape of it is square, like that of the Hermae, and the inscription declares that the Heavenly Aphrodite is the oldest of those called Fates. But the statue of Aphrodite in the Gardens is the work of Alcamenes, and one of the most note worthy things in Athens . 1.24.3. I have already stated that the Athenians are far more devoted to religion than other men. They were the first to surname Athena Ergane (Worker); they were the first to set up limbless Hermae, and the temple of their goddess is shared by the Spirit of Good men. Those who prefer artistic workmanship to mere antiquity may look at the following: a man wearing a helmet, by Cleoetas, whose nails the artist has made of silver, and an image of Earth beseeching Zeus to rain upon her; perhaps the Athenians them selves needed showers, or may be all the Greeks had been plagued with a drought. There also are set up Timotheus the son of Conon and Conon himself; Procne too, who has already made up her mind about the boy, and Itys as well—a group dedicated by Alcamenes. Athena is represented displaying the olive plant, and Poseidon the wave 2.3.4. Proceeding on the direct road to Lechaeum we see a bronze image of a seated Hermes. By him stands a ram, for Hermes is the god who is thought most to care for and to increase flocks, as Homer puts it in the Iliad :— Son was he of Phorbas, the dearest of Trojans to Hermes, Rich in flocks, for the god vouchsafed him wealth in abundance. Hom. Il. 14.490 The story told at the mysteries of the Mother about Hermes and the ram I know but do not relate. After the image of Hermes come Poseidon, Leucothea, and Palaemon on a dolphin. 2.10.7. Ascending from here to the gymnasium you see in the right a sanctuary of Artemis Pheraea. It is said that the wooden image was brought from Pherae. This gymnasium was built for the Sicyonians by Cleinias, and they still train the youths here. White marble images are here, an Artemis wrought only to the waist, and a Heracles whose lower parts are similar to the square Hermae. 2.34.11. Such are the possessions of the Hermionians in these parts. The modern city is just about four stades distant from the headland, upon which is the sanctuary of Poseidon, and it lies on a site which is level at first, gently rising up a slope, which presently merges into Pron, for so they name this mountain. A wall stands all round Hermione, a city which I found afforded much to write about, and among the things which I thought I myself must certainly mention are a temple of Aphrodite, surnamed both Pontia (of the Deep Sea) and Limenia (of the Harbor), and a white-marble image of huge size, and worth seeing for its artistic excellence. 3.16.11. but if ever the scourgers spare the lash because of a lad's beauty or high rank, then at once the priestess finds the image grow so heavy that she can hardly carry it. She lays the blame on the scourgers, and says that it is their fault that she is being weighed down. So the image ever since the sacrifices in the Tauric land keeps its fondness for human blood. They call it not only Orthia, but also Lygodesma (Willow-bound), because it was found in a thicket of willows, and the encircling willow made the image stand upright. 4.33.3. At the Arcadian gate leading to Megalopolis is a Herm of Attic style; for the square form of Herm is Athenian, and the rest adopted it thence. After a descent of thirty stades from the gate is the watercourse of Balyra. The river is said to have got its name from Thamyris throwing (ballein) his lyre away here after his blinding. He was the son of Philammon and the nymph Argiope, who once dwelt on Parnassus, but settled among the Odrysae when pregt, for Philammon refused to take her into his house. Thamyris is called an Odrysian and Thracian on these grounds. The watercourses Leucasia and Amphitos unite to form one stream. 6.25.1. Behind the portico built from the spoils of Corcyra is a temple of Aphrodite, the precinct being in the open, not far from the temple. The goddess in the temple they call Heavenly; she is of ivory and gold, the work of Pheidias, and she stands with one foot upon a tortoise. The precinct of the other Aphrodite is surrounded by a wall, and within the precinct has been made a basement, upon which sits a bronze image of Aphrodite upon a bronze he-goat. It is a work of Scopas, and the Aphrodite is named Common. The meaning of the tortoise and of the he-goat I leave to those who care to guess. 7.6.6. I myself know that Adrastus, a Lydian, helped the Greeks as a private individual, although the Lydian commonwealth held aloof. A likeness of this Adrastus in bronze was dedicated in front of the sanctuary of Persian Artemis by the Lydians, who wrote an inscription to the effect that Adrastus died fighting for the Greeks against Leonnatus. 7.22.2. The market-place of Pharae is of wide extent after the ancient fashion, and in the middle of it is an image of Hermes, made of stone and bearded. Standing right on the earth, it is of square shape, and of no great size. On it is an inscription, saying that it was dedicated by Simylus the Messenian. It is called Hermes of the Market, and by it is established an oracle. In front of the image is placed a hearth, which also is of stone, and to the hearth bronze lamps are fastened with lead. 7.27.1. The city of Pellene is on a hill which rises to a sharp peak at its summit. This part then is precipitous, and therefore uninhabited, but on the lower slopes they have built their city, which is not continuous, but divided into two parts by the peak that rises up between. As you go to Pellene there is, by the roadside, an image of Hermes, who, in spite of his surname of Crafty, is ready to fulfill the prayers of men. He is of square shape and bearded, and on his head is carved a cap. 8.31.7. In a building stand statues also, those of Callignotus, Mentas, Sosigenes and Polus. These men are said to have been the first to establish at Megalopolis the mysteries of the Great Goddesses, and the ritual acts are a copy of those at Eleusis . Within the enclosure of the goddesses are the following images, which all have a square shape: Hermes, surnamed Agetor, Apollo, Athena, Poseidon, Sun too, surnamed Saviour, and Heracles. There has also been built for them a [sanctuary] of vast size, and here they celebrate the mysteries in honor of the goddesses. 8.32.1. Such are the notable things on this site. The southern portion, on the other side of the river, can boast of the largest theater in all Greece, and in it is a spring which never fails. Not far from the theater are left foundations of the council house built for the Ten Thousand Arcadians, and called Thersilium after the man who dedicated it. Hard by is a house, belonging to-day to a private person, which originally was built for Alexander, the son of Philip. By the house is an image of Ammon, like the square images of Hermes, with a ram's horns on his head. 8.39.6. The image of Hermes in the gymnasium is like to one dressed in a cloak; but the statue does not end in feet, but in the square shape. A temple also of Dionysus is here, who by the inhabitants is surnamed Acratophorus, but the lower part of the image cannot be seen for laurel-leaves and ivy. As much of it as can be seen is painted . . . with cinnabar to shine. It is said to be found by the Iberians along with the gold. 10.12.6. However, death came upon her in the Troad, and her tomb is in the grove of the Sminthian with these elegiac verses inscribed upon the tomb-stone:— Here I am, the plain-speaking Sibyl of Phoebus, Hidden beneath this stone tomb. A maiden once gifted with voice, but now for ever voiceless, By hard fate doomed to this fetter. But I am buried near the nymphs and this Hermes, Enjoying in the world below a part of the kingdom I had then. The Hermes stands by the side of the tomb, a square-shaped figure of stone. On the left is water running down into a well, and the images of the nymphs.
19. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 15 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

15. Conceiving, however, that the first attention which should be paid to men, is that which takes place through the senses; as when some one perceives beautiful figures and forms, or hears beautiful rythms and melodies, he established that to be the first erudition which subsists through music, and also through certain melodies and rythms, from which the remedies of human manners and passions are obtained, together with those harmonies of the powers of the soul which it possessed from the first. He likewise devised medicines calculated to repress and expel the diseases both of bodies and souls. And by Jupiter that which deserves to be mentioned above all these particulars is this, that he arranged and adapted for his disciples what are called apparatus and contrectations, divinely contriving mixtures of certain diatonic, chromatic, and euharmonic melodies, through which he easily transferred and circularly led the passions of the soul into a contrary direction, when they had recently and in an irrational and clandestine manner been formed; such as sorrow, rage, and pity, absurd emulation and fear, all-various desires, angers, and appetites, pride, supineness, and vehemence. For he corrected each of these by the rule of virtue, attempering them through appropriate melodies, as 44through certain salutary medicines. In the evening, likewise, when his disciples were retiring to sleep, he liberated them by these means from diurnal perturbations and tumults, and purified their intellective power from the influxive and effluxive waves of a corporeal nature; rendered their sleep quiet, and their dreams pleasing and prophetic. But when they again rose from their bed, he freed them from nocturnal heaviness, relaxation and torpor, through certain peculiar songs and modulations, produced either by simply striking the lyre, or employing the voice. Pythagoras, however, did not procure for himself a thing of this kind through instruments or the voice, but employing a certain ineffable divinity, and which it is difficult to apprehend, he extended his ears, and fixed his intellect in the sublime symphonies of the world, he alone hearing and understanding, as it appears, the universal harmony and consoce of the spheres, and the stars that are moved through them, and which produce a fuller and more intense melody than any thing effected by mortal sounds.[17] This melody also was the result of 45dissimilar and variously differing sounds, celerities, magnitudes, and intervals, arranged with reference 46to each other in a certain most musical ratio, and thus producing a most gentle, and at the same time variously beautiful motion and convolution. Being therefore irrigated as it were with this melody, having the reason of his intellect well arranged through it, and as I may say, exercised, he determined to exhibit certain images of these things to his disciples as much as possible, especially producing an imitation of them through instruments, and through the mere voice alone. For he conceived that by him alone, of all the inhabitants of the earth, the mundane sounds were understood and heard, and this from a natural fountain itself and root. He therefore thought himself worthy to be 47taught, and to learn something about the celestial orbs, and to be assimilated to them by desire and imitation, as being the only one on the earth adapted to this by the conformation of his body, through the dæmoniacal power that inspired him. But he apprehended that other men ought to be satisfied in looking to him, and the gifts he possessed, and in being benefited and corrected through images and examples, in consequence of their inability to comprehend truly the first and genuine archetypes of things. Just, indeed, as to those who are incapable of looking intently at the sun, through the transcendent splendor of his rays, we contrive to exhibit the eclipses of that luminary, either in the profundity of still water, or through melted pitch, or through some darkly-splendid mirror; sparing the imbecility of their eyes, and devising a method of representing a certain repercussive light, though less intense than its archetype, to those who are delighted with a thing of this kind. Empedocles also appears to have obscurely signified this about Pythagoras, and the illustrious and divinely-gifted conformation of his body above that of other men, when he says:“There was a man among them [i. e. among the Pythagoreans] who was transcendent in knowledge, who possessed the most ample stores of intellectual wealth, and who was in the most eminent degree the adjutor of the works of the wise. For when he extended all the powers of his intellect, he easily 48beheld every thing, as far as to ten or twenty ages of the human race.”For the words transcendent, and he beheld every thing, and the wealth of intellect, and the like, especially exhibit the illustrious nature of the conformation of his mind and body, and its superior accuracy in seeing, and hearing, and in intellectual perception.
20. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 4.2857 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

21. Epigraphy, Ig I , 383, 369

22. Epigraphy, Ig I , 383, 369

23. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adrasteia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
adrastus, lydian personal name Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
adultery Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 148
aelius aristides, sacred tales Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 30
agora Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
alcman Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
alkibiades, and the mysteries Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
anaphora Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 271
andromeda and perseus Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
animals Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 144
anthropogony Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
aphrodite, and the sea Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
aphrodite, euploia Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
aphrodite, galenaia Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
aphrodite, limenia Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
aphrodite, pelagia Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
aphrodite, pontia Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
aphrodite, soteira, absence of the epithet Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
aphrodite Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
apocalyptic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 408
apparitions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 409
aristoboule Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
aristotle Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 151
art, religious Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 30
artemidorus Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 65
artemidorus of daldis, oneirocritica, composition and structure Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143
artemidorus of daldis, oneirocritica Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 30
artemidorus of daldis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
asclepius, power not limited to healing Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
asclepius soter, and seafaring Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
asclepius soter, in pergamum Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
athens Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 146
athens and athenians, cults and cult places of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
athletes, athletics Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 151
beard Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
bendis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
biography, hellenistic and roman Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 408
body, human Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 150
cavalry, and the herms Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
chariots, charioteers Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 151
clothes Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143, 144
coins, coinage Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 149, 150
council house, of athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
craftsmen Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 148
cronus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
cult images Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
dactyls Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
daldis Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 144
darius i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
dedicatory formulae Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
described as soteres, as divine specialists bearing functional epithets Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 156
deukalion Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
dice oracles, astragaloi and astragalomancy Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 65
dice oracles, combination and/or sum as connected to deity Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 65
dice oracles Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 65
dike Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
dionysos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
dishonesty, deceit Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 144
divination, and semiotics Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 65
divine speech, riddling Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 409
dream imagery, transgressive, taboo-breaking Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
dream imagery, violation of sacred law Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
dreams, and images Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 30
dreams, origins of Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143, 151
dreams, precognitive Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143
dreams, solicited Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 151
dreams and visions, dream figures, multiple Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 409
dreams and visions, dream figures, statues Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 409
dreams and visions, examples, artemidorus Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137, 408, 409
dreams and visions, examples, graeco-roman dreams, other Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
dreams and visions, examples, popular, personal, therapeutic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137, 408, 409
dreams and visions, participatory Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 408
dreams and visions, riddling Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
dreams and visions, theorematic Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 408
eirene Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
emperors, roman Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 146
enjambment Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 271
ephesus Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 147, 148, 149, 150
epiphany Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 156
erinyes Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
eunomia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
experience (peira) Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 146
fish, fishing Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 149
goats Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 149, 150
gods, aphrodite Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 149, 150
gods, apollo mystes Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 144
gods, artemis Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 146, 147, 148, 149, 150
gods, asclepius Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 151
gods, athena Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 148
gods, cybele Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 147
gods, helios Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 146, 151
gods, hermes Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 146, 149
gods, hestia Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 146
gods, selene Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 147
gods, zeus Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143, 146, 148
gods Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151
gold Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 148
graf, fritz Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 65
gymnasia Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 149
gymnasion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
heralds, persian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
herm, in vase painting Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 227
herm Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 227
hermes, and athens Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 227
hermes, and gymnasion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
hesiod Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
hetaira Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
hipparchos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 227
horace, love poetry Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 271
hunting Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 149
hypotaxis Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 271
jesus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
justice Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
komôs Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
kronos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
lamentation and grief Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
law Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
leisure Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143, 144
looking back' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
lydia and lydians, language of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
maximus of tyre Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
mother of the gods, and laws Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
mother of the gods, and nemesis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
mother of the gods, great Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
mother of the gods, multiple identities of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
mottos Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 271
mysteries, parody of Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
natural dreaming, body and health Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 408
naturalism, and visuality Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
naturalism Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
nomos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
ostwald, martin Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
ouranos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
parataxis Günther, Brill's Companion to Horace (2012) 271
pausanias the periegete Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
perseus and andromeda Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
philosophy and philosophers Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 146, 148
plato Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145
promatheia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
prophecy, prophetic dreams and visions Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 408
prophets Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 144
prostitutes Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 148, 150
pyrrha/aia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
pythagoras Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
reading in, Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
revelation and guidance Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
ritual Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
rome, roman empire Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 146
sacred law Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
sacrifice, human Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
samothracian gods Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 156
sardis, under persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
sea Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 149, 150
second sophistic, xvi Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 30
sex Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 143, 144
solon Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
soter, and divine nature Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 156
soul Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 151
sozein, passive forms Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
speech in dreams, incidental/overheard Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 408
stars Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145
statue, of deity Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 30
statues Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 147, 148, 149, 150
suda Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 227
tetragonos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 227
themis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
thrace and thracians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
vasari, giorgio Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
walde, christine Johnston and Struck, Mantikê: Studies in Ancient Divination (2005) 65
wealth Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 145, 146
winckelmann Elsner, Roman Eyes: Visuality and Subjectivity in Art and Text (2007) 11
witness Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 439
women Thonemann, An Ancient Dream Manual: Artemidorus' the Interpretation of Dreams (2020) 146
wordplay, in dreams and interpretation Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 137
zeus, and kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
zeus, and themis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
zeus, association with baalshamin Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
zeus, ouranios Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
zeus, phosphoros Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92
zeus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 334
zeus soter, and seafaring Jim, Saviour Gods and Soteria in Ancient Greece (2022) 92