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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1218
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 8.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 5.70-5.73, 7.140.3, 7.142.1, 8.56 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.70. Isagoras, who was on the losing side, devised a counter-plot, and invited the aid of Cleomenes, who had been his friend since the besieging of the Pisistratidae. It was even said of Cleomenes that he regularly went to see Isagoras' wife. ,Then Cleomenes first sent a herald to Athens demanding the banishment of Cleisthenes and many other Athenians with him, the Accursed, as he called them. This he said in his message by Isagoras' instruction, for the Alcmeonidae and their faction were held to be guilty of that bloody deed while Isagoras and his friends had no part in it. 5.71. How the Accursed at Athens had received their name, I will now relate. There was an Athenian named Cylon, who had been a winner at Olympia. This man put on the air of one who aimed at tyranny, and gathering a company of men of like age, he attempted to seize the citadel. When he could not win it, he took sanctuary by the goddess' statue. ,He and his men were then removed from their position by the presidents of the naval boards, the rulers of Athens at that time. Although they were subject to any penalty save death, they were slain, and their death was attributed to the Alcmaeonidae. All this took place before the time of Pisistratus. 5.72. When Cleomenes had sent for and demanded the banishment of Cleisthenes and the Accursed, Cleisthenes himself secretly departed. Afterwards, however, Cleomenes appeared in Athens with no great force. Upon his arrival, he, in order to take away the curse, banished seven hundred Athenian families named for him by Isagoras. Having so done he next attempted to dissolve the Council, entrusting the offices of government to Isagoras' faction. ,The Council, however, resisted him, whereupon Cleomenes and Isagoras and his partisans seized the acropolis. The rest of the Athenians united and besieged them for two days. On the third day as many of them as were Lacedaemonians left the country under truce. ,The prophetic voice that Cleomenes heard accordingly had its fulfillment, for when he went up to the acropolis with the intention of taking possession of it, he approached the shrine of the goddess to address himself to her. The priestess rose up from her seat, and before he had passed through the door-way, she said, “Go back, Lacedaemonian stranger, and do not enter the holy place since it is not lawful that Dorians should pass in here. “My lady,” he answered, “I am not a Dorian, but an Achaean.” ,So without taking heed of the omen, he tried to do as he pleased and was, as I have said, then again cast out together with his Lacedaemonians. As for the rest, the Athenians imprisoned them under sentence of death. Among the prisoners was Timesitheus the Delphian, whose achievements of strength and courage were quite formidable. 5.73. These men, then, were bound and put to death. After that, the Athenians sent to bring back Cleisthenes and the seven hundred households banished by Cleomenes. Then, desiring to make an alliance with the Persians, they despatched envoys to Sardis, for they knew that they had provoked the Lacedaemonians and Cleomenes to war. ,When the envoys came to Sardis and spoke as they had been bidden, Artaphrenes son of Hystaspes, viceroy of Sardis, asked them, “What men are you and where do you live, who desire alliance with the Persians?” When he had received the information he wanted from the envoys, he gave them an answer the substance of which was that if the Athenians gave king Darius earth and water, then he would make an alliance with them, but if not, his command was that they should depart. ,The envoys consulted together, and in their desire to make the alliance, they consented to give what was asked. They then returned to their own country and were there greatly blamed for what they had done. 7.140.3. quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Many a fortress too, not yours alone, will he shatter; /l lMany a shrine of the gods will he give to the flame for devouring; /l lSweating for fear they stand, and quaking for dread of the enemy, /l lRunning with gore are their roofs, foreseeing the stress of their sorrow; /l lTherefore I bid you depart from the sanctuary. /l lHave courage to lighten your evil. /l /quote 7.142.1. This answer seemed to be and really was more merciful than the first, and the envoys, writing it down, departed for Athens. When the messengers had left Delphi and laid the oracle before the people, there was much inquiry concerning its meaning, and among the many opinions which were uttered, two contrary ones were especially worthy of note. Some of the elder men said that the gods answer signified that the acropolis should be saved, for in old time the acropolis of Athens had been fenced by a thorn hedge 8.56. When this business concerning the Athenian acropolis was announced to the Hellenes at Salamis, some of the Peloponnesian generals became so alarmed that they did not even wait for the proposed matter to be decided, but jumped into their ships and hoisted their sails for flight. Those left behind resolved that the fleet should fight for the Isthmus. Night fell, and they dissolved the assembly and boarded their ships.
2. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 6.54.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.54.6. For the rest, the city was left in full enjoyment of its existing laws, except that care was always taken to have the offices in the hands of some one of the family. Among those of them that held the yearly archonship at Athens was Pisistratus, son of the tyrant Hippias, and named after his grandfather, who dedicated during his term of office the altar to the twelve gods in the market-place, and that of Apollo in the Pythian precinct.
4. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 8.3, 13.2-13.3, 22.5, 24.3, 26.2, 43.1, 47.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Demosthenes, Orations, 59.45-59.46 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Philochorus, Fragments, 64 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

7. Plutarch, On Brotherly Love, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

492b. to determine who should be king, the uncle, without the father's knowledge, slipped in alot for Aleuas. When the Pythian priestess drew the lot of Aleuas, his father denied that he had put in one for him, and to everyone it appeared that there had been some error in the recording of names. Set out they sent again and questioned the god a second time; and the prophetic priestess, as though to confirm fully her former declaration, answered: It is the red-haired man Imean, The child whom Archedicê bore. And in this manner Aleuas was proclaimed king by the god through the help of his father's brother, and himself surpassed by far his predecessors and advanced his race to great fame and power.
8. Plutarch, Solon, 19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19.2. Then he made the upper council a general overseer in the state, and guardian of the laws, thinking that the city with its two councils, riding as it were at double anchor, would be less tossed by the surges, and would keep its populace in greater quiet. Now most writers say that the council of the Areiopagus, as I have stated, was established by Solon. And their view seems to be strongly supported by the fact that Draco nowhere makes any mention whatsoever of Areiopagites, but always addresses himself to the ephetai in cases of homicide.
9. Lucian, Amores, 16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.25.10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.25.10. On descending from Bura towards the sea you come to a river called Buraicus, and to a small Heracles in a cave. He too is surnamed Buraicus, and here one can divine by means of a tablet and dice. He who inquires of the god offers up a prayer in front of the image, and after the prayer he takes four dice, a plentiful supply of which are placed by Heracles, and throws them upon the table. For every figure made by the dice there is an explanation expressly written on the tablet. I am very uncertain about the meaning of this passage. Frazer's note shows that divination by dice usually took the form of interpreting the sequences of numbers obtained by throwing several dice on to a board. This cannot be the meaning here, as σχῆμα can hardly denote a number on the face of a die, and in any case ἐξήγησιν τοῦ σχήματος must mean “explanation of the shape.” I have accordingly adopted the emendation ἀστραγάλων, but ἐπίτηδες seems to have no point. Frazer, reading apparently ἐπὶ δὲ παντὶ ἀστραγάλῳ σχῆμά τι κ.τ.ἕ, translates: “Each die has a certain figure marked upon it, and the meaning of each figure is explained on the tablet.”
11. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 1388, 1252



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acharnai Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
agroikos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30
anaphlystos Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
apollo ptoios, sortition Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
archons, archons, qualifications for Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
archons Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4, 62, 82
areiopagos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 563
areopagus, council of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4, 82
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
aristotle Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62, 82
assembly, athenian (ekklesia) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
athena pallenis, athena, treasurers of the sacred monies of Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
athenaion politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
athens Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
bones, at delphi Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
bones, knucklebones Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
bribery Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
callimachus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
chance, in delphic divination Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
charikles Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
class, relations Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
constitution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
council, of five hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
council, of four hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
courts, justice, administration of craftsmen Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
courts Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
damasias Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
demes (demoi) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
demos (damos), as court of appeals Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
demos (damos), empowerment of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
demos (damos), the ruling classes and Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
dermatikon account, dexion, orgeones of Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
dikasteria Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
dokimasia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 497
dêmiourgos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30
election Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4, 62, 82
elections Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30, 497
equality Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
eupatridai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30
eupatrids Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62, 82
euthune, peasant Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
foreign policy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
glaukos Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
greece Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
guarantors Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
hansen, mogens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
herakles buraikos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
hoplites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
houses, leasing of Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
interpretation, of inscriptions Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
jurors, juries, athenian (dikastai) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4, 82
korykian cave Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
kydathenaion Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
law, as distinct from decrees Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
law Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
leases, lessees Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
liturgies Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
lot Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30, 497
lots, aleatory divination Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
lots, beans Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
lots, pythias use of Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
megara, megarians Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
military call-up, command Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 497
mines, leasing/sale of Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
mount parnassos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
murder Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
narrative Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
naukraria Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 563
neaira Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
nomos Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
nomothetes, nomothetai Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
nymphs Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
oligarchy, oligarchs Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
ostracism Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30
parnassos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
participation in government, military service and Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
pausanias Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
pebbles Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
pebbles and bones Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
pentakosiomedimnoi Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
pentakosiomedimnos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30
persia Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
polemarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
prediction, divinatory Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
prytaneion/is Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 563
prytaneis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
psephismata Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
public office, officials Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4, 62
pythia, kleromancy Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
pythia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
reform, constitutional Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
reform Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
religion Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
representation Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
rituals, divinatory rituals Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
rotation Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
salamis Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
sarpedon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
ships Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 563
skiathos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
slavery, slaves Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
solon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62, 82
sortition Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4, 62, 82
sortition (kleromancy), by pythia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
sources, material Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
sources Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
sparta, spartans Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
statues, of herakles buraikos' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
story Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
strategoi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
superintendents of the dockyards Papazarkadas, Sacred and Public Land in Ancient Athens (2011) 313
taxation Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30, 563
temple Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
thessaly/thessalians, consultation at delphi Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 119
thês Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30
time Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
timocracy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
treasurers Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 4
tribes, pre-kleisthenic Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 563
tribes (phulai) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 62
tyranny, tyrants Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
war Ammann et al., Collective Violence and Memory in the Ancient Mediterranean (2023) 199
wealth Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 82
zeugitai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 30