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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1218
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 25.1
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 290-291, 669-673, 683, 754-777, 289 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

289. μολεῖν ἀρωγόν· κτήσεται δʼ ἄνευ δορὸς
2. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 601-624, 698-700, 600 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

600. θαρσεῖτε παῖδες. εὖ τὰ τῶν ἐγχωρίων· 600. Be of good cheer, my children, all goes well on the part of the citizens. Decrees, carrying full authority, have been passed. Chorus
3. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 2.86-2.88 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Herodotus, Histories, 7.140-7.142, 7.143.1-7.143.2, 8.57 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.140. The Athenians had sent messages to Delphi asking that an oracle be given them, and when they had performed all due rites at the temple and sat down in the inner hall, the priestess, whose name was Aristonice, gave them this answer: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Wretches, why do you linger here? Rather flee from your houses and city, /l lFlee to the ends of the earth from the circle embattled of Athens! /l lThe head will not remain in its place, nor in the body, /l lNor the feet beneath, nor the hands, nor the parts between; /l lBut all is ruined, for fire and the headlong god of war speeding in a Syrian chariot will bring you low. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Many a fortress too, not yours alone, will he shatter; /l lMany a shrine of the gods will he give to the flame for devouring; /l lSweating for fear they stand, and quaking for dread of the enemy, /l lRunning with gore are their roofs, foreseeing the stress of their sorrow; /l lTherefore I bid you depart from the sanctuary. /l lHave courage to lighten your evil. /l /quote 7.141. When the Athenian messengers heard that, they were very greatly dismayed, and gave themselves up for lost by reason of the evil foretold. Then Timon son of Androbulus, as notable a man as any Delphian, advised them to take boughs of supplication and in the guise of suppliants, approach the oracle a second time. ,The Athenians did exactly this; “Lord,” they said, “regard mercifully these suppliant boughs which we bring to you, and give us some better answer concerning our country. Otherwise we will not depart from your temple, but remain here until we die.” Thereupon the priestess gave them this second oracle: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Vainly does Pallas strive to appease great Zeus of Olympus; /l lWords of entreaty are vain, and so too cunning counsels of wisdom. /l lNevertheless I will speak to you again of strength adamantine. /l lAll will be taken and lost that the sacred border of Cecrops /l lHolds in keeping today, and the dales divine of Cithaeron; /l lYet a wood-built wall will by Zeus all-seeing be granted /l lTo the Trito-born, a stronghold for you and your children. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Await not the host of horse and foot coming from Asia, /l lNor be still, but turn your back and withdraw from the foe. /l lTruly a day will come when you will meet him face to face. /l lDivine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote 7.142. This answer seemed to be and really was more merciful than the first, and the envoys, writing it down, departed for Athens. When the messengers had left Delphi and laid the oracle before the people, there was much inquiry concerning its meaning, and among the many opinions which were uttered, two contrary ones were especially worthy of note. Some of the elder men said that the gods answer signified that the acropolis should be saved, for in old time the acropolis of Athens had been fenced by a thorn hedge, ,which, by their interpretation, was the wooden wall. But others supposed that the god was referring to their ships, and they were for doing nothing but equipping these. Those who believed their ships to be the wooden wall were disabled by the two last verses of the oracle: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Divine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote ,These verses confounded the opinion of those who said that their ships were the wooden wall, for the readers of oracles took the verses to mean that they should offer battle by sea near Salamis and be there overthrown. 7.143.1. Now there was a certain Athenian, by name and title Themistocles son of Neocles, who had lately risen to be among their chief men. He claimed that the readers of oracles had incorrectly interpreted the whole of the oracle and reasoned that if the verse really pertained to the Athenians, it would have been formulated in less mild language, calling Salamis “cruel” rather than “divine ” seeing that its inhabitants were to perish. 7.143.2. Correctly understood, the gods' oracle was spoken not of the Athenians but of their enemies, and his advice was that they should believe their ships to be the wooden wall and so make ready to fight by sea. 8.57. When Themistocles returned to his ship, Mnesiphilus, an Athenian, asked him what had been decided. Learning from him that they had resolved to sail to the Isthmus and fight for the Peloponnese, he said, ,“If they depart from Salamis, you will no longer be fighting for one country. Each will make his way to his own city, and neither Eurybiades nor any other man will be able to keep them from disbanding the army. Hellas will be destroyed by bad planning. If there is any way at all that you could persuade Eurybiades to change his decision and remain here, go try to undo this resolution.”
5. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.102, 2.22.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 2.2, 20.4, 22.3-22.5, 23.1, 25.2-25.4, 27.1 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Demosthenes, Orations, 13.23, 23.199 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, 118, 117 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plutarch, Cimon, 14.3-14.4, 15.3, 16.9-16.10, 17.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Plutarch, Pericles, 7.3-7.4, 9.2-9.5, 10.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.2. In the beginning, as has been said, pitted as he was against the reputation of Cimon, he tried to ingratiate himself with the people. And since he was the inferior in wealth and property, by means of which Cimon would win over the poor,—furnishing a dinner every day to any Athenian who wanted it, bestowing raiment on the elderly men, and removing the fences from his estates that whosoever wished might pluck the fruit,—Pericles, outdone in popular arts of this sort, had recourse to the distribution of the people’s own wealth. This was on the advice of Damonides, of the deme Oa, as Aristotle has stated. Aristot. Const. Ath. 27.4 . 10.5. And it was thought that before this, too, Elpinice had rendered Pericles more lenient towards Cimon, when he stood his trial on the capital charge of treason. 463. B.C. Cf. Plut. Cim. 14.2-4 . Pericles was at that time one of the committee of prosecution appointed by the people, and on Elpinice’s coming to him and supplicating him, said to her with a smile: Elpinice, thou art an old woman, thou art an old woman, to attempt such tasks. However, he made only one speech, by way of formally executing his commission, and in the end did the least harm to Cimon of all his accusers.
13. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 10.1 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10.1. BOOK 10: EPICURUSEpicurus, son of Neocles and Chaerestrate, was a citizen of Athens of the deme Gargettus, and, as Metrodorus says in his book On Noble Birth, of the family of the Philaidae. He is said by Heraclides in his Epitome of Sotion, as well as by other authorities, to have been brought up at Samos after the Athenians had sent settlers there and to have come to Athens at the age of eighteen, at the time when Xenocrates was lecturing at the Academy and Aristotle in Chalcis. Upon the death of Alexander of Macedon and the expulsion of the Athenian settlers from Samos by Perdiccas, Epicurus left Athens to join his father in Colophon.
14. Epigraphy, Ig Ii2, 2318

15. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 416



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392, 394, 397; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 113
aidôs Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 866
androtion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 866
apheleia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865, 866
apollo Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 394
archons, archons, qualifications for Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
archons Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
areopagus, council of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 113, 114
areopagus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392, 394, 397
argos Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 114
aristodikos of tanagra Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
aristotle aristotle Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
aristotles constitution of the athenians (athenaion politeia) Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392, 397
army Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
assembly, athenian (ekklesia) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113, 114
assembly Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 394, 397
athenaion politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
bribe Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865, 866
cavalry, and kimon Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
chabrias Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
choregos, dedications Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
cimon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392, 397; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113, 114
citizenship Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
cleisthenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
commoners Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
constitution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
council, of five hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 114
debate Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
demagogue Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
deme, officials Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
demetrius of phalerum, character in letter of aristeas, associated with ptolemy ii Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
demetrius of phalerum, historical character Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
democracy, ancient and modern, in the united states Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
demokrates Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
demokratia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
demos (damos), empowerment of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 114
demos (damos) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
dikasteria Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
dionysos, in demes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
ephialtes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108, 114
epikouros Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
euthynai Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 397
fleet Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 394
foreign policy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113, 114
fornara, charles Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
generation Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
helots Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
herodotus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 394; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
historiography, graeco-roman, inaccuracies in Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
hoplites Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
inaccuracies, chronological and factual Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
isagoras Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
jerusalem, compared with alexandria Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
judges Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 397
jurors, juries, administration of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
jurors, juries, athenian (dikastai) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
kings Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
kleruch, samos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
law Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
lemnos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
leocrates Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 397
letter of aristeas, historical reliability of Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
loutrophoros Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
menon of thessaly Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865, 866
monarchy Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
name Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
old oligarch (pseudo-xenophon) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
oligarchy, the four hundred Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 866
orestes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
ostracism Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865, 866; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
participation in government, by all citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
pericles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392, 397
persian wars Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 108
persuasion Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
philaidai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
phratry, and deme Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
phylarch Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
plutarch Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392, 397; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
poet/poetry Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
politeia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
politics Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392, 394
praise Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
ptolemy, character in letter of aristeas, associated with demetrius Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
public office, officials, accountability of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
re-writing, creative, of literary sources Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
realia Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
reform Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113, 114
representation Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
rhodes, p. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
salamis Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 394
samons, l. j. Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
sortition Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
sparta Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 392
story-world' Honigman, The Septuagint and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria: A Study in the Narrative of the Letter of Aristeas (2003) 88
strategoi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
themistocles Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 114
thesmothetes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 865
thucydides Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
warfare Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113
xerxes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 113