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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 16.2
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11 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 1.59-1.60, 1.59.6, 3.120, 5.66.2, 5.67, 5.77-5.78, 6.46 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.59. Now of these two peoples, Croesus learned that the Attic was held in subjection and divided into factions by Pisistratus, son of Hippocrates, who at that time was sovereign over the Athenians. This Hippocrates was still a private man when a great marvel happened to him when he was at Olympia to see the games: when he had offered the sacrifice, the vessels, standing there full of meat and water, boiled without fire until they boiled over. ,Chilon the Lacedaemonian, who happened to be there and who saw this marvel, advised Hippocrates not to take to his house a wife who could bear children, but if he had one already, then to send her away, and if he had a son, to disown him. ,Hippocrates refused to follow the advice of Chilon; and afterward there was born to him this Pisistratus, who, when there was a feud between the Athenians of the coast under Megacles son of Alcmeon and the Athenians of the plain under Lycurgus son of Aristolaides, raised up a third faction, as he coveted the sovereign power. He collected partisans and pretended to champion the uplanders, and the following was his plan. ,Wounding himself and his mules, he drove his wagon into the marketplace, with a story that he had escaped from his enemies, who would have killed him (so he said) as he was driving into the country. So he implored the people to give him a guard: and indeed he had won a reputation in his command of the army against the Megarians, when he had taken Nisaea and performed other great exploits. ,Taken in, the Athenian people gave him a guard of chosen citizens, whom Pisistratus made clubmen instead of spearmen: for the retinue that followed him carried wooden clubs. ,These rose with Pisistratus and took the Acropolis; and Pisistratus ruled the Athenians, disturbing in no way the order of offices nor changing the laws, but governing the city according to its established constitution and arranging all things fairly and well. 1.59.6. These rose with Pisistratus and took the Acropolis; and Pisistratus ruled the Athenians, disturbing in no way the order of offices nor changing the laws, but governing the city according to its established constitution and arranging all things fairly and well. 1.60. But after a short time the partisans of Megacles and of Lycurgus made common cause and drove him out. In this way Pisistratus first got Athens and, as he had a sovereignty that was not yet firmly rooted, lost it. Presently his enemies who together had driven him out began to feud once more. ,Then Megacles, harassed by factional strife, sent a message to Pisistratus offering him his daughter to marry and the sovereign power besides. ,When this offer was accepted by Pisistratus, who agreed on these terms with Megacles, they devised a plan to bring Pisistratus back which, to my mind, was so exceptionally foolish that it is strange (since from old times the Hellenic stock has always been distinguished from foreign by its greater cleverness and its freedom from silly foolishness) that these men should devise such a plan to deceive Athenians, said to be the subtlest of the Greeks. ,There was in the Paeanian deme a woman called Phya, three fingers short of six feet, four inches in height, and otherwise, too, well-formed. This woman they equipped in full armor and put in a chariot, giving her all the paraphernalia to make the most impressive spectacle, and so drove into the city; heralds ran before them, and when they came into town proclaimed as they were instructed: ,“Athenians, give a hearty welcome to Pisistratus, whom Athena herself honors above all men and is bringing back to her own acropolis.” So the heralds went about proclaiming this; and immediately the report spread in the demes that Athena was bringing Pisistratus back, and the townsfolk, believing that the woman was the goddess herself, worshipped this human creature and welcomed Pisistratus. 3.120. While Cambyses was still ill, the following events occurred. The governor of Sardis appointed by Cyrus was Oroetes, a Persian. This man had an impious desire; for although he had not been injured or spoken badly of by Polycrates of Samos, and had in fact never even seen him before, he desired to seize and kill him, for the following reason, most people say. ,As Oroetes and another Persian whose name was Mitrobates, governor of the province at Dascyleium, sat at the king's doors, they fell from talking to quarreling; and as they compared their achievements Mitrobates said to Oroetes, ,“You are not to be reckoned a man; the island of Samos lies close to your province, yet you have not added it to the king's dominion—an island so easy to conquer that some native of it revolted against his rulers with fifteen hoplites, and is now lord of it.” ,Some say that Oroetes, angered by this reproach, did not so much desire to punish the source of it as to destroy Polycrates utterly, the occasion of the reproach. 5.66.2. These men with their factions fell to contending for power, Cleisthenes was getting the worst of it in this dispute and took the commons into his party. Presently he divided the Athenians into ten tribes instead of four as formerly. He called none after the names of the sons of Ion—Geleon, Aegicores, Argades, and Hoples—but invented for them names taken from other heroes, all native to the country except Aias. Him he added despite the fact that he was a stranger because he was a neighbor and an ally. 5.67. In doing this, to my thinking, this Cleisthenes was imitating his own mother's father, Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon, for Cleisthenes, after going to war with the Argives, made an end of minstrels' contests at Sicyon by reason of the Homeric poems, in which it is the Argives and Argos which are primarily the theme of the songs. Furthermore, he conceived the desire to cast out from the land Adrastus son of Talaus, the hero whose shrine stood then as now in the very marketplace of Sicyon because he was an Argive. ,He went then to Delphi, and asked the oracle if he should cast Adrastus out, but the priestess said in response: “Adrastus is king of Sicyon, and you but a stone thrower.” When the god would not permit him to do as he wished in this matter, he returned home and attempted to devise some plan which might rid him of Adrastus. When he thought he had found one, he sent to Boeotian Thebes saying that he would gladly bring Melanippus son of Astacus into his country, and the Thebans handed him over. ,When Cleisthenes had brought him in, he consecrated a sanctuary for him in the government house itself, where he was established in the greatest possible security. Now the reason why Cleisthenes brought in Melanippus, a thing which I must relate, was that Melanippus was Adrastus' deadliest enemy, for Adrastus had slain his brother Mecisteus and his son-in-law Tydeus. ,Having then designated the precinct for him, Cleisthenes took away all Adrastus' sacrifices and festivals and gave them to Melanippus. The Sicyonians had been accustomed to pay very great honor to Adrastus because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingship to him. ,Besides other honors paid to Adrastus by the Sicyonians, they celebrated his lamentable fate with tragic choruses in honor not of Dionysus but of Adrastus. Cleisthenes, however, gave the choruses back to Dionysus and the rest of the worship to Melanippus. 5.77. When this force then had been ingloriously scattered, the Athenians first marched against the Chalcidians to punish them. The Boeotians came to the Euripus to help the Chalcidians and as soon as the Athenians saw these allies, they resolved to attack the Boeotians before the Chalcidians. ,When they met the Boeotians in battle, they won a great victory, slaying very many and taking seven hundred of them prisoner. On that same day the Athenians crossed to Euboea where they met the Chalcidians too in battle, and after overcoming them as well, they left four thousand tet farmers on the lands of the horse-breeders. ,Horse-breeders was the name given to the men of substance among the Chalcidians. They fettered as many of these as they took alive and kept them imprisoned with the captive Boeotians. In time, however, they set them free, each for an assessed ransom of two minae. The fetters in which the prisoners had been bound they hung up in the acropolis, where they could still be seen in my time hanging from walls which the Persians' fire had charred, opposite the temple which faces west. ,Moreover, they made a dedication of a tenth part of the ransom, and this money was used for the making of a four-horse chariot which stands on the left hand of the entrance into the outer porch of the acropolis and bears this inscription: quote type="inscription" l met="dact" Athens with Chalcis and Boeotia fought, /l lBound them in chains and brought their pride to naught. /l lPrison was grief, and ransom cost them dear- /l lOne tenth to Pallas raised this chariot here. /l /quote 5.78. So the Athenians grew in power and proved, not in one respect only but in all, that equality is a good thing. Evidence for this is the fact that while they were under tyrannical rulers, the Athenians were no better in war than any of their neighbors, yet once they got rid of their tyrants, they were by far the best of all. This, then, shows that while they were oppressed, they were, as men working for a master, cowardly, but when they were freed, each one was eager to achieve for himself. 6.46. In the next year after this, Darius first sent a message bidding the Thasians, who were falsely reported by their neighbors to be planning rebellion, to destroy their walls and bring their ships to Abdera. ,Since they had been besieged by Histiaeus of Miletus and had great revenues, the Thasians had used their wealth to build ships of war and surround themselves with stronger walls. ,Their revenue came from the mainland and from the mines. About eighty talents on average came in from the gold-mines of the “Dug Forest”, and less from the mines of Thasos itself, yet so much that the Thasians, paying no tax on their crops, drew a yearly revenue from the mainland and the mines of two hundred talents on average, and three hundred when the revenue was greatest.
2. Isocrates, Orations, 12.149, 16.25 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 5.43.2-5.43.3, 6.16, 6.54.5-6.54.6, 6.89, 8.12, 8.16, 8.47, 8.56, 8.81-8.82 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5.43.2. Foremost amongst these was Alcibiades, son of Clinias, a man yet young in years for any other Hellenic city, but distinguished by the splendor of his ancestry. Alcibiades thought the Argive alliance really preferable, not that personal pique had not also a great deal to do with his opposition; he being offended with the Lacedaemonians for having negotiated the treaty through Nicias and Laches, and having overlooked him on account of his youth, and also for not having shown him the respect due to the ancient connection of his family with them as their Proxeni, which, renounced by his grandfather, he had lately himself thought to renew by his attentions to their prisoners taken in the island. 6.54.5. Indeed, generally their government was not grievous to the multitude, or in any way odious in practice; and these tyrants cultivated wisdom and virtue as much as any, and without exacting from the Athenians more than a twentieth of their income, splendidly adorned their city, and carried on their wars, and provided sacrifices for the temples. 6.54.6. For the rest, the city was left in full enjoyment of its existing laws, except that care was always taken to have the offices in the hands of some one of the family. Among those of them that held the yearly archonship at Athens was Pisistratus, son of the tyrant Hippias, and named after his grandfather, who dedicated during his term of office the altar to the twelve gods in the market-place, and that of Apollo in the Pythian precinct.
4. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 13.5, 16.3-16.8, 16.10, 21.5 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 7.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.3. 1.  In the sixty-fourth Olympiad, when Miltiades was archon at Athens, the Tyrrhenians who had inhabited the country lying near the Ionian Gulf, but had been driven from thence in the course of time by the Gauls, joined themselves to the Umbrians, Daunians, and many other barbarians, and undertook to overthrow Cumae, the Greek city in the country of the Opicans founded by Eretrians and Chalcidians, though they could allege no other just ground for their animosity than the prosperity of the city.,2.  For Cumae was at that time celebrated throughout all Italy for its riches, power, and all the other advantages, as it possessed the most fertile part of the Campanian plain and was mistress of the most convenient havens round about Misenum. The barbarians, accordingly, forming designs upon these advantages, marched against this city with an army consisting of no less than 500,000 foot and 18,000 horse. While they lay encamped not far from the city, a remarkable prodigy appeared to them, the like of which is not recorded as ever having happened anywhere in either the Greek or the barbarian world.,3.  The rivers, namely, which ran near their camp, one of which is called the Volturnus and the other the Glanis, abandoning their natural course, turned their streams backwards and for a long time continued to run up from their mouths toward their sources.,4.  The Cumaeans, being informed of this prodigy, were then at last encouraged to engage with the barbarians, in the assurance that Heaven designed to bring low the lofty eminence of their foes and to raise their own fortunes, which seemed at low ebb. And having divided all their youth into three bodies, with one of these they defended the city, with another they guarded their ships, and the third they drew up before the walls to await the enemy's attack. These consisted of 600 horse and of 4500 foot. And though so few in number, they sustained the attack of so many myriads.
7. Nicolaus of Damascus, Fragments, 52 (1st cent. BCE

8. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 23.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23.7. For while Agis the king was away on his campaigns, Alcibiades corrupted Timaea his wife, so that she was with child by him and made no denial of it. When she had given birth to a male child, it was called Leotychides in public, but in private the name which the boy’s mother whispered to her friends and attendants was Alcibiades. Such was the passion that possessed the woman. But he, in his mocking way, said he had not done this thing for a wanton insult, nor at the behest of mere pleasure, but in order that descendants of his might be kings of the Lacedaemonians.
9. Plutarch, Cimon, 13.7-13.8 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Pericles, 7.1, 16.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.1. of his power there can be no doubt, since Thucydides gives so clear an exposition of it, and the comic poets unwittingly reveal it even in their malicious gibes, calling him and his associates new Peisistratidae, and urging him to take solemn oath not to make himself a tyrant, on the plea, forsooth, that his preeminence was incommensurate with a democracy and too oppressive.
11. Aelian, Varia Historia, 9.25 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agorai Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
alcibiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
alcmaeonids Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
amphitres of miletus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
anthropology, historical anthropology Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
archinus of argos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
archons Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic, competition among Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
aristocratic values Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
aristodemus of cyme Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
aristotle Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
artaxerxes i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
athens, agora of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
athens Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
athens and athenians, in pentecontaetia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
basileis Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
big men Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
boeotia, boeotians Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
booty Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
bribery Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
callias son of hipponicus (elder) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
chalcis, chalcidians Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
charity Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
citizenship, determined by fellow citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
class struggle Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
cleisthenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
commoners Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
council, of five hundred Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
crete Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
crisa Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
dark age Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
debts, cancellation of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
demarch Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
demes, athenian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
demes (demoi) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
demos (damos), as agent of change Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
dionysus Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
economy, economic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
eisphora Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
eleusis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
elite, as aristocrats Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
elitist ideology Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
euthune, peasant Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
festivals, promoted by tyrants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
festivals Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
figs Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
generosity Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
grain Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
hecatombaea, agon of the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
hektēmoroi Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
heracles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
heraclids Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
heralds, eleusinian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
herodotus, historian Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93, 103
hipparchos, son peisistratos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 192
hippias, tyrant, son of peisistratos Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 192
hippias Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
homer Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
isagoras Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
land, redistribution of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
law, rule of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
lawgivers Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
liturgies, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
livestock, funds derived from Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
loans, advanced by tyrant Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
loans Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93, 103, 142
long walls (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
mercenaries, misthotoi, epikouroi Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 192
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
mother of the gods, and persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
mother of the gods, and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
munificence Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103
oikos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
olives Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
olympieium Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
peasants Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93, 103, 142
peisistratos, tyrant of athens Lalone, Athena Itonia: Geography and Meaning of an Ancient Greek War Goddess (2019) 192
peisistratus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
peisistratus and peisistratids Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
peloponnese Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
pericles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
persia and persians, treaties with greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
phratries Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
pisistratus Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50; Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93, 142
poor, the Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 103, 142
ps.-aristotle, athenaion politeia Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
public buildings, in fifth-century athens Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
reform, tribal Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
reform Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
satrap Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
seisachtheia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
social tensions Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
solon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
sources Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
sparta Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
sparta and spartans, kingship at Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
stoa of the herms (athens) Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
taxation, direct and indirect Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
taxes, on crops Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
taxes, port Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
theseum Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 142
thucydides, and herodotus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
thucydides, on alcibiades Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
thucydides, on tyrants and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
tithe, collected by tyrant Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
treasurers Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
tribute, from mines Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
tribute Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
tyranny, greek attitudes towards' Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 319
tyranny, tyrants Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
tyrants, and construction projects Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
tyrants, and the demos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
tyrants, as benefactors of the demos Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
tyrants, benefactions by Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93, 103
tyrants, loans advanced by Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
tyrants, social background of Gygax, Benefaction and Rewards in the Ancient Greek City: The Origins of Euergetism (2016) 93
tyrants, tithe, collected by Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
warfare Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 76
wine Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50
yields Gygax and Zuiderhoek, Benefactors and the Polis: The Public Gift in the Greek Cities from the Homeric World to Late Antiquity (2021) 50