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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1218
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 1


nan. . . . swearing by sacred objects according to merit. And the guilt of pollution having been brought home to them, their dead bodies were cast out of their tombs, and their family was banished for ever. On this Epimenides the Cretan purified the city.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Euripides, Fragments, 952 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Herodotus, Histories, 5.71, 5.72.1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.71. How the Accursed at Athens had received their name, I will now relate. There was an Athenian named Cylon, who had been a winner at Olympia. This man put on the air of one who aimed at tyranny, and gathering a company of men of like age, he attempted to seize the citadel. When he could not win it, he took sanctuary by the goddess' statue. ,He and his men were then removed from their position by the presidents of the naval boards, the rulers of Athens at that time. Although they were subject to any penalty save death, they were slain, and their death was attributed to the Alcmaeonidae. All this took place before the time of Pisistratus.
3. Plato, Euthyphro, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4b. Euthyphro. Very far, indeed, Socrates, by Zeus. Socrates. Is the one who was killed by your father a relative? But of course he was; for you would not bring a charge of murder against him on a stranger’s account. Euthyphro. It is ridiculous, Socrates, that you think it matters whether the man who was killed was a stranger or a relative, and do not see that the only thing to consider is whether the action of the slayer was justified or not, and that if it was justified one ought to let him alone, and if not, one ought to proceed against him, even if he share one’s hearth
4. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

642d. not by outward compulsion but by inner disposition. Thus, so far as I am concerned, you may speak without fear and say all you please. Clin. My story, too, Stranger, when you hear it, will show you that you may boldly say all you wish. You have probably heard how that inspired man Epimenides, who was a family connection of ours, was born in Crete ; and how ten years before the Persian War, in obedience to the oracle of the god, he went to Athens and offered certain sacrifices which the god had ordained; and how, moreover, when the Athenians were alarmed at the Persians’ expeditionary force
5. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

343a. to utter such remarks is to be ascribed to his perfect education. Such men were Thales of Miletus, Pittacus of Mytilene, Bias of Priene, Solon of our city, Cleobulus of Lindus, Myson of Chen, and, last of the traditional seven, Chilon of Sparta . All these were enthusiasts, lovers and disciples of the Spartan culture; and you can recognize that character in their wisdom by the short, memorable sayings that fell from each of them they assembled together
6. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

21b. Critias was already close upon ninety years of age, while I was somewhere about ten; and it chanced to be that day of the Apaturia which is called Cureotis. The ceremony for boys which was always customary at the feast was held also on that occasion, our fathers arranging contests in recitation. So while many poems of many poets were declaimed, since the poems of Solon were at that time new, many of us children chanted them. And one of our fellow tribesmen—whether he really thought so at the time or whether he was paying a compliment
7. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.20.2, 1.89, 1.100, 1.108, 1.126.3-1.126.12, 6.54-6.59, 8.48-8.49, 8.52-8.56, 8.65-8.69, 8.81-8.82, 8.84, 8.86, 8.89, 8.97 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.20.2. The general Athenian public fancy that Hipparchus was tyrant when he fell by the hands of Harmodius and Aristogiton; not knowing that Hippias, the eldest of the sons of Pisistratus, was really supreme, and that Hipparchus and Thessalus were his brothers; and that Harmodius and Aristogiton suspecting, on the very day, nay at the very moment fixed on for the deed, that information had been conveyed to Hippias by their accomplices, concluded that he had been warned, and did not attack him, yet, not liking to be apprehended and risk their lives for nothing, fell upon Hipparchus near the temple of the daughters of Leos, and slew him as he was arranging the Panathenaic procession. 1.126.6. Whether the grand festival that was meant was in Attica or elsewhere was a question which he never thought of, and which the oracle did not offer to solve. For the Athenians also have a festival which is called the grand festival of Zeus Meilichios or Gracious, viz. the Diasia. It is celebrated outside the city, and the whole people sacrifice not real victims but a number of bloodless offerings peculiar to the country. However, fancying he had chosen the right time, he made the attempt. 1.126.7. As soon as the Athenians perceived it, they flocked in, one and all, from the country, and sat down, and laid siege to the citadel.
8. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 8.3, 21.5 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Demosthenes, Orations, 21.115 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 15.54.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15.54.2.  Certain local oracle-mongers likewise came up to Epameinondas, saying that the Lacedaemonians were destined to meet with a great disaster by the tomb of the daughters of Leuctrus and Scedasus for the following reasons.
11. Plutarch, Solon, 12.1-12.9 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12.1. Now the Cylonian pollution had for a long time agitated the city, ever since Megacles the archon had persuaded Cylon and his fellow conspirators, who had taken sanctuary in the temple of Athena, to come down and stand their trial. About 636 B.C. Cf. Hdt. 5.71 ; Thuc. 1.126 . They fastened a braided thread to the image of the goddess and kept hold of it, but when they reached the shrine of the Erinyes on their way down, the thread broke of its own accord, upon which Megacles and his fellow-archons rushed to seize them, on the plea that the goddess refused them the rights of suppliants. Those who were outside of sacred precincts were stoned to death, and those who took refuge at the altars were slaughtered there; only those were spared who made supplication to the wives of the archons. 12.2. Therefore the archons were called polluted men and were held in execration. The survivors of the followers of Cylon also recovered strength, and were forever at variance with the descendants of Megacles. At this particular time the quarrel was at its height and the people divided between the two factions. Solon, therefore, being now in high repute, interposed between them, along with the noblest of the Athenians, and by his entreaties and injunctions persuaded the men who were held to be polluted to submit to a trial, and to abide by the decision of three hundred jurors selected from the nobility. 12.3. Myron of Phlya conducted the prosecution, and the family of Megacles was found guilty. Those who were alive were banished, and the bodies of the dead were dug up and cast forth beyond the borders of the country. During these disturbances the Megarians also attacked the Athenians, who lost Nisaea, and were driven out of Salamis once more. The city was also visited with superstitious fears and strange appearances, and the seers declared that their sacrifices indicated pollutions and defilements which demanded expiation. 12.4. Under these circumstances they summoned to their aid from Crete Epimenides of Phaestus, who is reckoned as the seventh Wise Man by some of those who refuse Periander a place in the list. See note on Plut. Sol. 3.5, and cf. Aristot. Const. Ath. 1 . He was reputed to be a man beloved of the gods, and endowed with a mystical and heaven-sent wisdom in religious matters. Therefore the men of his time said that he was the son of a nymph named Balte, and called him a new Cures. The Curetes were Cretan priests of Idaean Zeus, who took their name from the demi-gods to whose care Rhea was said to have committed the infant Zeus. On coming to Athens he made Solon his friend, assisted him in many ways, and paved the way for his legislation. 12.5. For he made the Athenians decorous and careful in their religious services, and milder in their rites of mourning, by attaching certain sacrifices immediately to their funeral ceremonies and by taking away the harsh and barbaric practices in which their women had usually indulged up to that time. Most important of all, by sundry rites of propitiation and purification, and by sacred foundations, he hallowed and consecrated the city, and brought it to be observant of justice and more easily inclined to uimity. It is said that when he had seen Munychia The acropolis of the Peiraeus, stategically commanding not only that peninsula, but also Athens itself. garrisoned by conquerors of Athens and considered it for some time, he remarked to the bystanders that man was indeed blind to the future; 12.6. for if the Athenians only knew what mischiefs the place would bring upon their city, they would devour it with their own teeth. A similar insight into futurity is ascribed to Thales. They say that he gave directions for his burial in an obscure and neglected quarter of the city’s territory, predicting that it would one day be the market-place of Miletus. Well then, Epimenides was vastly admired by the Athenians, who offered him much money and large honors; but he asked for nothing more than a branch of the sacred olive-tree, with which he returned home.
12. Pollux, Onomasticon, 8.108 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

13. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 1.25, 1.110 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.25. (It was Pythagoras who developed to their furthest extent the discoveries attributed by Callimachus in his Iambics to Euphorbus the Phrygian, I mean scalene triangles and whatever else has to do with theoretical geometry.)Thales is also credited with having given excellent advice on political matters. For instance, when Croesus sent to Miletus offering terms of alliance, he frustrated the plan; and this proved the salvation of the city when Cyrus obtained the victory. Heraclides makes Thales himself say that he had always lived in solitude as a private individual and kept aloof from State affairs. Some authorities say that he married and had a son Cybisthus; 1.110. So he became famous throughout Greece, and was believed to be a special favourite of heaven.Hence, when the Athenians were attacked by pestilence, and the Pythian priestess bade them purify the city, they sent a ship commanded by Nicias, son of Niceratus, to Crete to ask the help of Epimenides. And he came in the 46th Olympiad, purified their city, and stopped the pestilence in the following way. He took sheep, some black and others white, and brought them to the Areopagus; and there he let them go whither they pleased, instructing those who followed them to mark the spot where each sheep lay down and offer a sacrifice to the local divinity. And thus, it is said, the plague was stayed. Hence even to this day altars may be found in different parts of Attica with no name inscribed upon them, which are memorials of this atonement. According to some writers he declared the plague to have been caused by the pollution which Cylon brought on the city and showed them how to remove it. In consequence two young men, Cratinus and Ctesibius, were put to death and the city was delivered from the scourge.
14. Epigraphy, Seg, 52.48

15. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 567, 653-655, 564



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis of athens Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 525
aegean islands Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 525
alcmaeonids Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53, 146
alcmeonids Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 525
areiopagos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic, competition among Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
aristocracy, aristocrats, aristocratic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
aristotle Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
asia minor Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 525
astrology Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
athenaion politeia Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
attica Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
autobiography Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 90
bias Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
citizens, political awareness among Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
civil strife Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
class, lower Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
cleisthenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53, 146
constitution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
crete Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
cultic ritual practice, curse tablets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
cylon Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53, 146
death and the afterlife, curse tablets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
demes (demoi) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
democracy, ancient and modern, origins of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
demos (damos), as agent of change Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
demos (damos) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
dikê (goddess) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 90
diodorus siculus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
diogenes laertius Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
dokimasia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
dreros Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
eder, walter Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
epaminondas (military general) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
epimenides Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
equality Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
eschatology deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
eupatridai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
eupatrids Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
genre Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 90
gold leaves / gold tablets deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
herodotus Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53, 146
hesychidai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
hexameter (poetry) Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 90
hippeis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
homicide Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
initiators deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
isegoria Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
isomoiria. see land, redistribution of isonomia (isonomie) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
katabasis Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 90
kosmos, kosmoi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
kylon Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
law Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
lykomidai Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
mass, masses Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53, 146
megara, megarians Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
meier, christian Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
methodology Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
neutrality Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
ober, josiah, vii–viii Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
oenophyta Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
oligarchic conspiracy/revolution (nan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
omophagy deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
oracles, seers/diviners (manteis) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
oracles Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
orpheus Iribarren and Koning, Hesiod and the Beginnings of Greek Philosophy (2022) 90
orphics deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
participation in government, by all citizens Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
participation in government, by the demos Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
peloponnesian war Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
pentakosiomedimnos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
periander Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
piraeus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 525
pittacus Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
plato Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
plato / (neo-)platonism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
plutarch Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
politics Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
pollution Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650
priests (hiereis)/priestesses (hiereiai)/priesthood Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
prytaneis, of the naukraroi Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
public office, officials, accountability of Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
public office, officials Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53, 146
purifications Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
reform, constitutional Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
reform, legal Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
religious authority, experts (exegetes) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
religious authority, seers/diviners (manteis)' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
revolution Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
rites deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
rotation Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
seers Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
shaman Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
solon Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
sources, deriving from oral tradition Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
sources, epigraphic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
sources, poetic Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
sources Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
sparta, spartans Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
sparta/spartans, kings Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
sparta/spartans Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305
symposia Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
telete deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
thales Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
theagenes Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53, 146
theognis Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
theseus Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 525
thucydides, son of melesias, manuscript traditionnan Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 671
thucydides Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
tradition Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
treasurers Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 650; Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
tribes (phulai) Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 53
tyranny, tyrants Raaflaub Ober and Wallace, Origins of Democracy in Ancient Greece (2007) 146
vegetarianism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 28
water Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
wisdom Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
wonder-workers Lloyd, The Revolutions of Wisdom: Studies in the Claims and Practice of Ancient Greek Science (1989) 84
xenophon Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 305