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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1211
Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 988
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

25 results
1. Homeric Hymns, To Pan, 46 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 263 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

263. Φαλῆς ἑταῖρε Βακχίου
3. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 388-403, 421-423, 425, 456-461, 463-465, 469-470, 387 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

387. ἆρ' ἐξέλαμψε τῶν γυναικῶν ἡ τρυφὴ
4. Aristophanes, Clouds, 299-313, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

298. παρθένοι ὀμβροφόροι
5. Aristophanes, Peace, 130-134, 143, 147, 154-161, 169-172, 66, 97, 129 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

129. ἐν τοῖσιν Αἰσώπου λόγοις ἐξηυρέθη
6. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 490-497, 507-534, 553-556, 571, 604, 489 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

489. φανερὸν μὲν ἔγωγ' οἶμαι γνῶναι τοῦτ' εἶναι πᾶσιν ὁμοίως
7. Aristophanes, Frogs, 316-459, 1259 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1259. τὸν Βακχεῖον ἄνακτα
8. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 1001-1230, 177-266, 275, 279-654, 668-674, 689-761, 764, 769-778, 804, 808-809, 869-870, 930-987, 989-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
9. Euripides, Andromache, 222 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

222. ὦ φίλταθ' ̔́Εκτορ, ἀλλ' ἐγὼ τὴν σὴν χάριν
10. Euripides, Bacchae, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150-1153, 116-118, 1189, 119-166, 195, 225, 366, 443-450, 485-486, 528, 576-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-656, 66, 667, 67, 677-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-769, 77, 770-774, 78-86, 862, 87-91, 918-919, 92, 920-929, 93, 930-939, 94, 940-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

100. τέλεσαν, ταυρόκερων θεὸν 100. had perfected him, the bull-horned god, and he crowned him with crowns of snakes, for which reason Maenads cloak their wild prey over their locks. Choru
11. Euripides, Hippolytus, 560 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

560. did she cut short the fatal marriage of Semele, mother of Zeus-bom Bacchus. All things she doth inspire, dread goddess, winging her flight hither and thither like a bee. Phaedra
12. Euripides, Ion, 716, 218 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 953, 164 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Herodotus, Histories, 4.79 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.79. But when things had to turn out badly for him, they did so for this reason: he conceived a desire to be initiated into the rites of the Bacchic Dionysus; and when he was about to begin the sacred mysteries, he saw the greatest vision. ,He had in the city of the Borysthenites a spacious house, grand and costly (the same house I just mentioned), all surrounded by sphinxes and griffins worked in white marble; this house was struck by a thunderbolt. And though the house burnt to the ground, Scyles none the less performed the rite to the end. ,Now the Scythians reproach the Greeks for this Bacchic revelling, saying that it is not reasonable to set up a god who leads men to madness. ,So when Scyles had been initiated into the Bacchic rite, some one of the Borysthenites scoffed at the Scythians: “You laugh at us, Scythians, because we play the Bacchant and the god possesses us; but now this deity has possessed your own king, so that he plays the Bacchant and is maddened by the god. If you will not believe me, follow me now and I will show him to you.” ,The leading men among the Scythians followed him, and the Borysthenite brought them up secretly onto a tower; from which, when Scyles passed by with his company of worshippers, they saw him playing the Bacchant; thinking it a great misfortune, they left the city and told the whole army what they had seen.
15. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 148-154, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 669-683, 668 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 211, 1105 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.7.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.7.4. And which do you think are the better, his slaves or your gentlefolk? My gentlefolk, I think. Then is it not disgraceful that you with your gentlefolk should be in distress, while he is kept in affluence by his meaner household? of course his dependants are artisans, while mine have had a liberal education.
19. Demosthenes, Orations, 59, 45 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

20. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.32.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.32.7.  Although their wives are comely, they have very little to do with them, but rage with lust, in outlandish fashion, for the embraces of males. It is their practice to sleep upon the ground on the skins of wild beasts and to tumble with a catamite on each side. And the most astonishing thing of all is that they feel no concern for their proper dignity, but prostitute to others without a qualm the flower of their bodies; nor do they consider this a disgraceful thing to do, but rather when anyone of them is thus approached and refuses the favour offered him, this they consider an act of dishonour.
21. Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico, 6.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

22. Strabo, Geography, 15.1.59-15.1.60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

15.1.59. Megasthenes divides the philosophers again into two kinds, the Brachmanes and the Garmanes. The Brachmanes are held in greater repute, for they agree more exactly in their opinions. Even from the time of their conception in the womb they are under the care and guardianship of learned men, who go to the mother, and seem to perform some incantation for the happiness and welfare of the mother and the unborn child, but in reality they suggest prudent advice, and the mothers who listen to them most willingly are thought to be the most fortunate in their offspring. After the birth of the children, there is a succession of persons who have the care of them, and as they advance in years, masters more able and accomplished succeed.The philosophers live in a grove in front of the city within a moderate-sized enclosure. Their diet is frugal, and they lie upon straw pallets and on skins. They abstain from animal food, and from sexual intercourse with women; their time is occupied in grave discourse, and they communicate with those who are inclined to listen to them; but the hearer is not permitted to speak or cough, or even to spit on the ground; otherwise, he is expelled that very day from their society, on the ground of having no control over himself. After living thirty-seven years in this manner, each individual retires to his own possessions, and lives with less restraint, wearing robes of fine linen, and rings of gold, but without profuseness, upon the hands and in the ears. They eat the flesh of animals, of those particularly which do not assist man in his labour, and abstain from hot and seasoned food. They have as many wives as they please with a view to numerous offspring, for from many wives greater advantages are derived.As they have no slaves, they require more the services, which are at hand, of their children.The Brachmanes do not communicate their philosophy to their wives, for fear they should divulge to the profane, if they became depraved, anything which ought to be concealed or lest they should abandon their husbands in case they became good (philosophers) themselves. For no one who despises alike pleasure and pain, life and death, is willing to be subject to the authority of another; and such is the character of a virtuous man and a virtuous woman.They discourse much on death, for it is their opinion that the present life is the state of one conceived in the womb, and that death to philosophers is birth to a real and a happy life. They therefore discipline themselves much to prepare for death, and maintain that nothing which happens to man is bad or good, for otherwise the same things would not be the occasion of sorrow to some and of joy to others, opinions being merely dreams, nor that the same persons could be affected with sorrow and joy by the same things, on different occasions.With regard to opinions on physical phenomena, they display, says Megasthenes, great simplicity, their actions being better than their reasoning, for their belief is chiefly founded on fables. On many subjects their sentiments are the same as those of the Greeks. According to the Brachmanes, the world was created, and is liable to corruption; it is of a spheroidal figure; the god who made and governs it pervades the whole of it; the principles of all things are different, but the principle of the world's formation was water; in addition to the four elements there is a fifth nature, of which the heavens and the stars are composed; the earth is situated in the centre of the universe. Many other peculiar things they say of the principle of generation and of the soul. They invent fables also, after the manner of Plato, on the immortality of the soul, and on the punishments in Hades, and other things of this kind. This is the account which Megasthenes gives of the Brachmanes. 15.1.60. of the Garmanes, the most honourable, he says, are the Hylobii, who live in the forests, and subsist on leaves and wild fruits: they are clothed with garments made of the bark of trees, and abstain from commerce with women and from wine. The kings hold communication with them by messengers, concerning the causes of things, and through them worship and supplicate the Divinity.Second in honour to the Hylobii, are the physicians, for they apply philosophy to the study of the nature of man. They are of frugal habits, but do not live in the fields, and subsist upon rice and meal, which every one gives when asked, and receive them hospitably. They are able to cause persons to have a numerous offspring, and to have either male or female children, by means of charms. They cure diseases by diet, rather than by medicinal remedies. Among the latter, the most in repute are unguents and cataplasms. All others they suppose partake greatly of a noxious nature.Both this and the other class of persons practise fortitude, as well in supporting active toil as in enduring suffering, so that they will continue a whole day in the same posture, without motion.There are enchanters and diviners, versed in the rites and customs relative to the dead, who go about villages and towns begging. There are others who are more civilized and better informed than these, who inculcate the vulgar opinions concerning Hades, which, according to their ideas, tend to piety and sanctity. Women study philosophy with some of them, but abstain from sexual intercourse.
23. Lucian, Dialogues of The Courtesans, 4.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 486, 485

25. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 45.2, 52.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agave Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
anapaests Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
anti-hero, dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
antigone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
aristophanes, and dance at the thesmophoria (in thesm.) Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
athens Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
bacchus, βάκχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
ballet Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
barbarian/barbaros Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
bull Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus, ancient, greek, comic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
chremylus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
cithaeron Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
comedy, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
creon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
cult songs Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dance, dancing, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
dance, round / circular Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dicaeopolis Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
didaskalia Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
dionysos, dionysos bacchas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos, dionysos baccheios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos, dionysos baccheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos, dionysos bacchios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos, dionysos bacchos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
dionysos, dionysos elelichthon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
eros (sexual desire), of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
fight Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
foreigner Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
fury, cf. anger gall, cf. bile gender Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
garden party, relief from nineveh Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
gods, dancing to Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
great dionysia, city dionysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
hero, comic hero Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
hero Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
initiation, initiatory rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
ithyphallos, ithyphallic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
kraters Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
literature, greek, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
lyres/lyrody/citharas/citharists, depicted on vases Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
lysistrata Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
maenads Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
miracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
mnesilochus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
mountains Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
mystic, mystical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
nineveh, garden-party relief Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
olympus, olympian, god Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
peisetaerus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
pelinna Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
penia/poverty Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
philocleon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
poseidon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
promiscuity, of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
prostitution, athenian Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 191
satyr drama, satyr-play Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
scythian archers Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
search scenes Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
semele Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
sophistic Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
sparagmos Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
thebes Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
thebes (boeotia) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
thesmophoria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273, 381
trygaeus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
utopia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 270
vase paintings, singing Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 381
women, dancing Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 54
women Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 112
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273
worshippers' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 273