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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1211
Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 276
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Aristophanes, Frogs, 102, 1471, 830, 834, 838-839, 101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

101. ἢ φρένα μὲν οὐκ ἐθέλουσαν ὀμόσαι καθ' ἱερῶν
2. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 267-268, 270, 272-275, 266 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

266. ἁνὴρ μὲν ἡμῖν οὑτοσὶ καὶ δὴ γυνὴ
3. Euripides, Hippolytus, 608, 611-612, 653-655, 607 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

607. O by thy knees I pray, destroy me not utterly. Hippolytu
4. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1202, 1201 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, On Duties, 3.108 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.108. Non enim falsum iurare periurare est, sed, quod EX ANIMI TUI SENTENTIA iuraris, sicut verbis concipitur more nostro, id non facere periurium est. Scite enim Euripides: Iurávi lingua, méntem iniuratám gero. Regulus vero non debuit condiciones pactionesque bellicas et hostiles perturbare periurio. Cum iusto enim et legitimo hoste res gerebatur, adversus quem et totum ius fetiale et multa sunt iura communia. Quod ni ita esset, numquam claros viros senatus vinctos hostibus dedidisset. 3.108.  For swearing to what is false is not necessarily perjury, but to take an oath "upon your conscience," as it is expressed in our legal formulas, and then fail to perform it, that is perjury. For Euripides aptly says: "My tongue has sworn; the mind I have has sworn no oath." But Regulus had no right to confound by perjury the terms and covets of war made with an enemy. For the war was being carried on with a legitimate, declared enemy; and to regulate our dealings with such an enemy, we have our whole fetial code as well as many other laws that are binding in common between nations. Were this not the case, the senate would never have delivered up illustrious men of ours in chains to the enemy.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 292
aeschylus (the real one) Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
agathon Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
agōn Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
animals as oath sacrifices Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 292
aphrodite, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206
aristophanes Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 127
aristotle Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206
artemis Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206
authorial voice, parodies euripides Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
cicero Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
crane/mēchanē Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
dionysus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246, 292
engages with aeschylean corpus, hippolytus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
eros (sexual desire), of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
euripides, in aristophanes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
euripides (the real one) Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
glossa, distinct from mind Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206
guilt, inherited, hades (underworld) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 292
heracles Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 292
horkos (oath) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
hygiaenon Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
lenaea Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
oath, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206
phaedra Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the hippolytus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206
platform/ekkyklēma Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
plot, oath as plot feature Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 11
promiscuity, of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
props Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 142
prostitution, athenian Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 191
ruin (atē), increase sanctity of oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 292
sacrifice, oath sacrifice off stage Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 11
sacrificial victim Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 11
socrates Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 246
sopaeus, outside sophoclean corpus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 292
supplication, in the hippolytus' Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206
theseus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 206