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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1211
Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 265-268
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ἁνὴρ μὲν ἡμῖν οὑτοσὶ καὶ δὴ γυνὴAGATHON: Try them on. Now that you have all you need, let me be taken inside. EURIPIDES: You look for all the world like a woman. But when you talk, take good care to give your voice a woman's tone. MNESILOCHUS: I'll try my best. EURIPIDES: Come, get yourself to the temple. MNESILOCHUS: No, by Apollo, not unless you swear to me ... EURIPIDES: What? MNESILOCHUS: ... that, if anything untoward happen to me, you will leave nothing undone to save me. EURIPIDES Very well! I swear it by the Ether, the dwelling-place of the king of the gods. MNESILOCHUS: Why not rather swear it by the disciples of Hippocrates? EURIPIDES: Come, I swear it by all the gods, both great and small.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Anacreon, Fragments, 388 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Anacreon, Fragments, 388 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 479, 409 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

409. ἀλλ' ἐκκυκλήσομαι: καταβαίνειν δ' οὐ σχολή.
4. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 1000, 1008-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1132, 1136-1139, 114, 1140-1142, 115-117, 1172-1179, 118, 1180-1189, 119, 1190-1198, 120-152, 157-170, 177-264, 266-268, 275, 279-389, 39, 390-399, 40, 400-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-529, 53, 530-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 60, 600-609, 61, 610-619, 62, 620-629, 63, 630-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-654, 66, 668-669, 67, 670-674, 68, 689, 69, 690-699, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-761, 764, 77-80, 804, 808-809, 81-94, 941-942, 947-949, 95, 950-959, 96, 960-969, 97, 970-979, 98, 980-989, 99, 990-999, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

100. μύρμηκος ἀτραπούς, ἢ τί διαμινύρεται;
5. Sophocles, Ajax, 579-582, 578 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.7.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.7.4. And which do you think are the better, his slaves or your gentlefolk? My gentlefolk, I think. Then is it not disgraceful that you with your gentlefolk should be in distress, while he is kept in affluence by his meaner household? of course his dependants are artisans, while mine have had a liberal education.
7. Demosthenes, Orations, 59, 45 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Lucian, Dialogues of The Courtesans, 4.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Philostratus The Athenian, Life of Apollonius, 2.22 (2nd cent. CE

2.22. While he was waiting in the Temple, — and it took a long time for the king to be informed that strangers had arrived, — Apollonius said: O Damis, is there such a thing as painting? Why yes, he answered, if there be any such thing as truth. And what does this art do? It mixes together, replied Damis, all the colors there are, blue with green, and white with black, and red with yellow. And for what reason, said the other, does it mix these? For it isn't merely to get a color, like dyed wax. It is, said Damis, for the sake of imitation, and to get a likeness of a dog, or a horse, or a man, or a ship, or of anything else under the sun; and what is more, you see the sun himself represented, sometimes borne upon a four horse car, as he is said to be seen here, and sometimes again traversing the heaven with his torch, in case you are depicting the ether and the home of the gods. Then, O Damis, painting is imitation? And what else could it be? said he: for if it did not effect that, it would voted to be an idle playing with colors. And, said the other, the things which are seen in heaven, whenever the clouds are torn away from one another, I mean the centaurs and stag-antelopes, yes, and the wolves too, and the horses, what have you got to say about them? Are we not to regard them as works of imitation? It would seem so, he replied. Then, Damis, God is a painter, and has left his winged chariot, upon which he travels, as he disposes of affairs human and divine, and he sits down on these occasions to amuse himself by drawing these pictures, as children make figures in the sand. Damis blushed, for he felt that his argument was reduced to such an absurdity. But Apollonius, on his side, had no wish to humiliate him, for he was not unfeeling in his refutations of people, and said: But I am sure, Damis, you did not mean that; rather that these figures flit through the heaven not only without meaning, but, so far as providence is concerned, by mere chance; while we who by nature are prone to imitation rearrange and create them in these regular figures. We may, he said, rather consider this to be the case, O Apollonius, for it is more probable, and a much sounder idea. Then, O Damis, the mimetic art is twofold, and we may regard the one kind as an employment of the hands and mind in producing imitations, and declare that this is painting, whereas the other kind consists in making likenesses with the mind alone. Not twofold, replied Damis, for we ought to regard the former as the more perfect and more complete kind, being anyhow painting and a faculty of making likenesses with the help both of mind and hand; but we must regard the other kind as a department that, since its possessor perceives and imitates with the mind, without having the delineative faculty, and would never use his hand in depicting its objects. Then, said Apollonius, you mean, Damis, that the hand may be disabled by a blow or by disease? No, he answered, but it is disabled, because it has never handled pencil nor any instrument or color, and has never learned to draw. Then, said the other, we are both of us, Damis, agreed that man owes his mimetic faculty to nature, but his power of painting to art. And the same would appear to be true of plastic art. But, methinks, you would not confine painting itself to the mere use of colors, for a single color was often found sufficient for this purpose by our older painters; and as the art advanced, it employed four, and later, yet more; but we must also concede the name of a painting to an outline drawn without any color at all, and composed merely of shadow and light. For in such designs we see a resemblance, we see form and expression, and modesty and bravery, although they are altogether devoid of color; and neither blood is represented, nor the color of a man's hair or beard; nevertheless these compositions in monochrome are likenesses of people either tawny or white, and if we drew one of these Indians with a pencil without color, yet he would be known for a negro, for his flat nose, and his stiff curling locks and prominent jaw, and a certain gleam about his eyes, would give a black look to the picture and depict an Indian to the eyes of all those who have intelligence. And for this reason I should say that those who look at works of painting and drawing require a mimetic faculty; for no one could appreciate or admire a picture of a horse or of a bull, unless he had formed an idea of the picture represented. Nor again could one admire a picture of Ajax, by the painter Timomachus, which represents him in a state of madness, unless one had conceived in one's mind first an idea or notion of Ajax, and had entertained the probability that after killing the flocks in Troy he would sit down exhausted and even meditate suicide. But these elaborate works of Porus we cannot, Damis, regard as works of brass founding alone, for they are cast in brass; so let us regard them as the chefs d'oeuvre of a man who is both painter and brass-founder at once, and as similar to the work of Hephaestus upon the shield of Achilles, as revealed in Homer. For they are crowded together in that work too men slaying and slain, and you would say that the earth was stained with gore, though it is made of brass.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acharnians, the (aristophanes) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 232
acropolis (of athens) Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
actors/acting, tragoidos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
aeschylus Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
age-class, age-set Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
ajax, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 232
anacreon vases Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
aristophanes, and machines Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 232
artemon Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
barbitos Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
beard Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
breasts Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
choreography, tragic Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
chorodidaskaloi/hypodidaskaloi Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
clodius pulcher Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
cyrene, dance, in drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
deme Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
eccyclema Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 232
eros (sexual desire), of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
euripides, and the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 705
euripides, never an actor Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
extras Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 705
fascia (in general) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
fascia pectoralis (breast wrap) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
girdle Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
gods, in euripides Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 705
gymnasion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
hercules Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
homosexuality Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
machines, use of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 232
naked Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
old tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
omphale Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
opening (clothing) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
pericles Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
platforms, use of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 232
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
playwrights, tragedy (fifth century), agathon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
promiscuity, of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
prostitution, athenian' Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 191
slaves Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
sophocles, as actor Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
sources, primary Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
strophium (belt/cord) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
symposium/symposia Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
tecmessa, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 232
theologeion Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 705
travesty Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501
zeus, on the theologeion Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 705
zona (belt) Radicke, Roman Women’s Dress: Literary Sources, Terminology, and Historical Development (2022) 501