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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1211
Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 177-268
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ἔπειτα πῶς οὐκ αὐτὸς ἀπολογεῖ παρών;AGATHON: But why not go and defend yourself? EURIPIDES: 'Tis impossible. First of all, I am known; further, I have white hair and a long beard; whereas you, you are good-looking, charming, and are close-shaven; you are fair, delicate, and have a woman's voice. AGATHON: Euripides! EURIPIDES: Well? AGATHON: Have you not said in one of your pieces, "You love to see the light, and don't you believe your father loves it too?" EURIPIDES: Yes. AGATHON: Then never you think I am going to expose myself in your stead; 'twould be madness. 'Tis for you to submit to the fate that overtakes you; one must not try to trick misfortune, but resign oneself to it with good grace. MNESILOCHUS: This is why you, you wretch, offer your posterior with a good grace to lovers, not in words, but in actual fact. EURIPIDES: But what prevents your going there? AGATHON: I should run more risk than you would.
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κάκιον ἀπολοίμην ἂν ἢ σύ. πῶς; ὅπως;EURIPIDES: Why? AGATHON: Why? I should look as if I were wanting to trespass on secret nightly pleasures of the women and to ravish their Aphrodite. MNESILOCHUS: Of wanting to ravish indeed! you mean wanting to be ravished — in the rearward mode. Ah! great gods! a fine excuse truly! EURIPIDES: Well then, do you agree? AGATHON: Don't count upon it. EURIPIDES: Oh! I am unfortunate indeed! I am undone! MNESILOCHUS: Euripides, my friend, my son-in-law, never despair. EURIPIDES: What can be done? MNESILOCHUS: Send him to the devil and do with me as you like. EURIPIDES: Very well then, since you devote yourself to my safety, take off your cloak first. MNESILOCHUS: There, it lies on the ground. But what do you want to do with me? EURIPIDES: To shave off this beard of yours, and to remove your hair below as well. MNESILOCHUS: Do what you think fit; I yield myself entirely to you. EURIPIDES: Agathon, you have always razors about you; lend me one. AGATHON: Take if yourself, there, out of that case. EURIPIDES: Thanks. Sit down and puff out the right cheek. MNESILOCHUS: Oh! oh! oh! EURIPIDES: What are you shouting for? I'll cram a spit down your gullet, if you're not quiet. MNESILOCHUS: Oh! oh! oh! oh! oh! oh! (He springs up and starts running away.) EURIPIDES: Where are you running to now?
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οὗτος σὺ ποῖ θεῖς; ἐς τὸ τῶν σεμνῶνMNESILOCHUS: To the shrine of the Eumenides. No, by Demeter I won't let myself be gashed like that. EURIPIDES: But you will get laughed at, with your face half-shaven like that. MNESILOCHUS: Little care I: EURIPIDES: In the gods' names, don't leave me in the lurch. Come here. MNESILOCHUS: Oh! by the gods! (Resumes his seat.) EURIPIDES: Keep still and hold up your head. Why do you want to fidget about like this? MNESILOCHUS: Mu, mu. EURIPIDES: Well! why, mu, mu? There! 'tis done and well done too! MNESILOCHUS Ah! great god! It makes me feel quite light. EURIPIDES: Don't worry yourself; you look charming. Do you want to see yourself? MNESILOCHUS: Aye, that I do; hand the mirror here. EURIPIDES: Do you see yourself? MNESILOCHUS: But this is not I, it is Clisthenes! EURIPIDES: Stand up; I am now going to remove your hair. Bend down. MNESILOCHUS: Alas! alas! they are going to grill me like a pig. EURIPIDES: Come now, a torch or a lamp! Bend down and take care of the tender end of your tail! MNESILOCHUS: Aye, aye! but I'm afire! oh! oh! Water, water, neighbour, or my rump will be alight! EURIPIDES: Keep up your courage! MNESILOCHUS: Keep my courage, when I'm being burnt up? EURIPIDES: Come, cease your whining, the worst is over.
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ἀποπεπόνηκας. φῦ ἰοὺ τῆς ἀσβόλου.MNESILOCHUS: Oh! it's quite black, all burnt below there all about the hole! EURIPIDES: Don't worry! that will be washed off with a sponge. MNESILOCHUS: Woe to him who dares to wash my rump! EURIPIDES: Agathon, you refuse to devote yourself to helping me; but at any rate lend me a tunic and a belt. You cannot say you have not got them. AGATHON: Take them and use them as you like; I consent. MNESILOCHUS: What must be taken? EURIPIDES: What must be taken? First put on this long saffron-coloured robe. MNESILOCHUS: By Aphrodite! what a sweet odour! how it smells of a man's genitals! Hand it me quickly. And the belt? EURIPIDES: Here it is. MNESILOCHUS: Now some rings for my legs. EURIPIDES: You still want a hair-net and a head-dress. AGATHON: Here is my night-cap. EURIPIDES: Ah! that's capital. MNESILOCHUS: Does it suit me? AGATHON: It could not be better. EURIPIDES: And a short mantle? AGATHON: There's one on the couch; take it. EURIPIDES: He wants slippers. AGATHON: Here are mine. MNESILOCHUS: Will they fit me? You like a loose fit.
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ἁνὴρ μὲν ἡμῖν οὑτοσὶ καὶ δὴ γυνὴAGATHON: Try them on. Now that you have all you need, let me be taken inside. EURIPIDES: You look for all the world like a woman. But when you talk, take good care to give your voice a woman's tone. MNESILOCHUS: I'll try my best. EURIPIDES: Come, get yourself to the temple. MNESILOCHUS: No, by Apollo, not unless you swear to me ... EURIPIDES: What? MNESILOCHUS: ... that, if anything untoward happen to me, you will leave nothing undone to save me. EURIPIDES Very well! I swear it by the Ether, the dwelling-place of the king of the gods. MNESILOCHUS: Why not rather swear it by the disciples of Hippocrates? EURIPIDES: Come, I swear it by all the gods, both great and small.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Anacreon, Fragments, 388 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Anacreon, Fragments, 388 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 1008-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1132, 1136-1139, 114, 1140-1142, 115-117, 1172-1179, 118, 1180-1189, 119, 1190-1198, 120-129, 134-145, 159-170, 178-266, 275, 279-654, 668-674, 689-761, 764, 804, 808-809, 941-942, 947-959, 96, 960-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
4. Xenophon, Memoirs, 2.7.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.7.4. And which do you think are the better, his slaves or your gentlefolk? My gentlefolk, I think. Then is it not disgraceful that you with your gentlefolk should be in distress, while he is kept in affluence by his meaner household? of course his dependants are artisans, while mine have had a liberal education.
5. Demosthenes, Orations, 59, 45 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Lucian, Dialogues of The Courtesans, 4.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis (of athens) Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
actors/acting, tragoidos Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
aeschylus Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
age-class, age-set Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
anacreon vases Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
artemon Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
barbitos Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
beard Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
choreography, tragic Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
chorodidaskaloi/hypodidaskaloi Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
cyrene, dance, in drama Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
deme Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
eros (sexual desire), of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
euripides, never an actor Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
gymnasion Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
homosexuality Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
old tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
pericles Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136
playwrights, comedy (greek), aristophanes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
playwrights, tragedy (fifth century), agathon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
promiscuity, of barbarians Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 404
prostitution, athenian' Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 191
slaves Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 436
sophocles, as actor Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 207
symposium/symposia Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 136