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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1207
Aristophanes, Peace, 796-801
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 665 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

665. δεῦρο Μοῦς' ἐλθὲ φλεγυρὰ πυρὸς ἔχουσα μένος ἔντονος ̓Αχαρνική.
2. Aristophanes, Birds, 738-739, 737 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

737. Μοῦσα λοχμαία
3. Aristophanes, Peace, 524-728, 742-747, 752-760, 762-763, 773-780, 785, 797-804, 835-840, 864, 871-876, 879, 887-895, 523 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

523. ὦ χαῖρ' ̓Οπώρα, καὶ σὺ δ' ὦ Θεωρία.
4. Aristophanes, Frogs, 675 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

675. Μοῦσα χορῶν ἱερῶν: ἐπίβηθι καὶ ἔλθ' ἐπὶ τέρψιν ἀοιδᾶς ἐμᾶς
5. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 60-62, 59 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

59. ὃς ἕτοιμος σοῦ τοῦ τε ποιητοῦ
6. Herodotus, Histories, 2.134-2.135 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.134. This king, too, left a pyramid, but far smaller than his father's, each side twenty feet short of three hundred feet long, square at the base, and as much as half its height of Ethiopian stone. Some Greeks say that it was built by Rhodopis, the courtesan, but they are wrong; ,indeed, it is clear to me that they say this without even knowing who Rhodopis was (otherwise, they would never have credited her with the building of a pyramid on which what I may call an uncountable sum of money was spent), or that Rhodopis flourished in the reign of Amasis, not of Mycerinus; ,for very many years later than these kings who left the pyramids came Rhodopis, who was Thracian by birth, and a slave of Iadmon son of Hephaestopolis the Samian, and a fellow-slave of Aesop the story-writer. For he was owned by Iadmon, too, as the following made crystal clear: ,when the Delphians, obeying an oracle, issued many proclamations summoning anyone who wanted it to accept compensation for the killing of Aesop, no one accepted it except the son of Iadmon's son, another Iadmon; hence Aesop, too, was Iadmon's. 2.135. Rhodopis came to Egypt to work, brought by Xanthes of Samos, but upon her arrival was freed for a lot of money by Kharaxus of Mytilene, son of Scamandronymus and brother of Sappho the poetess. ,Thus Rhodopis lived as a free woman in Egypt, where, as she was very alluring, she acquired a lot of money—sufficient for such a Rhodopis, so to speak, but not for such a pyramid. ,Seeing that to this day anyone who likes can calculate what one tenth of her worth was, she cannot be credited with great wealth. For Rhodopis desired to leave a memorial of herself in Greece, by having something made which no one else had thought of or dedicated in a temple and presenting this at Delphi to preserve her memory; ,so she spent one tenth of her substance on the manufacture of a great number of iron beef spits, as many as the tenth would pay for, and sent them to Delphi ; these lie in a heap to this day, behind the altar set up by the Chians and in front of the shrine itself. ,The courtesans of Naucratis seem to be peculiarly alluring, for the woman of whom this story is told became so famous that every Greek knew the name of Rhodopis, and later on a certain Archidice was the theme of song throughout Greece, although less celebrated than the other. ,Kharaxus, after giving Rhodopis her freedom, returned to Mytilene . He is bitterly attacked by Sappho in one of her poems. This is enough about Rhodopis.
7. Stesichorus, Fragments, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agathon Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
aristophanes, peace Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
aristophanes Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 118
audience, theatre Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
chorus, cf. choregia, choregos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
council, cf. boule councilors/bouleutai Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
demos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
dionysus, dionysiac (rites, farce etc.) Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
epic Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
eupolis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
euripides, helen Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
euripides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
expectation (negative and positive) Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 91
hecataeus, of miletus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
helen Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
herodotus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
homer Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
mnesilochus, also in-law Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
obscenity/vulgarism/vulgarity Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
opora, also cornucopia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
orchestra Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
paratragedy, and the use of hope as a comic device Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 91
priests, egyptian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
retribution, divine' Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
rhodopis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
slave Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
stesichorus, oresteia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
stesichorus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 108
strip Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
theoria, also holiday, show-time Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
trygaeus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282