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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1207
Aristophanes, Peace, 663-728
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ἡμάρτομεν ταῦτ': ἀλλὰ συγγνώμην ἔχε:TRYGAEUS: Yes, we did wrong, but forgive us, for our mind was then entirely absorbed in leather. HERMES: Listen again to what she has just asked me. Who was her greatest foe here? and furthermore, had she a friend who exerted himself to put an end to the fighting? TRYGAEUS: Her most devoted friend was Cleonymus; it is undisputed. HERMES: How then did Cleonymus behave in fights? TRYGAEUS: Oh! the bravest of warriors! Only he was not born of the father he claims; he showed it quick enough in the army by throwing away his weapons. HERMES: There is yet another question she has just put to me. Who rules now in the rostrum? TRYGAEUS: 'Tis Hyperbolus, who now holds empire on the Pnyx. (To Peace.) What now? you turn away your head! HERMES: She is vexed, that the people should give themselves a wretch of that kind for their chief. TRYGAEUS Oh! we shall not employ him again; but the people, seeing themselves without a leader, took him haphazard, just as a man, who is naked, springs upon the first cloak he sees. HERMES: She asks, what will be the result of such a choice of the city?
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Σιμωνίδης; πῶς; ὅτι γέρων ὢν καὶ σαπρὸςTRYGAEUS: Because, though old and broken-down as he is, he would put to sea on a hurdle to gain an obolus. HERMES: And wise Cratinus, is he still alive? TRYGAEUS: He died about the time of the Laconian invasion. HERMES: How? TRYGAEUS: Of a swoon. He could not bear the shock of seeing one of his casks full of wine broken. Ah! what a number of other misfortunes our city has suffered! So, dearest mistress, nothing can now separate us from thee. HERMES: If that be so, receive Opora here for a wife; take her to the country, live with her, and grow fine grapes together. TRYGAEUS: Come, my dear friend, come and accept my kisses. Tell me, Hermes, my master, do you think it would hurt me to fuck her a little, after so long an abstinence? HERMES: No, not if you swallow a potion of penny-royal afterwards. But hasten to lead Theoria to the Senate; 'twas there she lodged before. TRYGAEUS: Oh! fortunate Senate! Thanks to Theoria, what soups you will swallow for the space of three days! how you will devour meats and cooked tripe! Come, farewell, friend Hermes! HERMES: And to you also, my dear sir, may you have much happiness, and don't forget me.
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ὦ κάνθαρ' οἴκαδ' οἴκαδ' ἀποπετώμεθα.TRYGAEUS: Come, beetle, home, home, and let us fly on a swift wing. HERMES: Oh! he is no longer here. TRYGAEUS: Where has he gone to then? HERMES: He is harnessed to the chariot of Zeus and bears the thunderbolts. TRYGAEUS: But where will the poor wretch get his food? HERMES: He will eat Ganymede's ambrosia. TRYGAEUS: Very well then, but how am I going to descend? HERMES: Oh! never fear, there is nothing simpler; place yourself beside the goddess. TRYGAEUS: Come, my pretty maidens, follow me quickly; there are plenty of folk awaiting you with standing tools.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Aristophanes, Birds, 1516-1524, 1527, 1536-1552, 186, 1515 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1515. ἐξ οὗπερ ὑμεῖς ᾠκίσατε τὸν ἀέρα.
2. Aristophanes, Peace, 211-212, 371, 403-438, 444-446, 469, 523-662, 664-728, 742-747, 752-760, 762-763, 773-780, 796-804, 835-840, 864, 871-876, 879, 887-895, 204 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

204. ̔́Ελλησιν ὀργισθέντες. εἶτ' ἐνταῦθα μὲν
3. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1113-1116, 1118-1170, 1112 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1112. ἡμᾶς; ὁτιὴ δεινότατα πάντων πραγμάτων
4. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 60-62, 59 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

59. ὃς ἕτοιμος σοῦ τοῦ τε ποιητοῦ


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agathon Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
amphitryo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
asclepius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
barbarians Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
chorus, cf. choregia, choregos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
council, cf. boule councilors/bouleutai Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
cremylus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
demos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
dionysus, dionysiac (rites, farce etc.) Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
euripides Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
food Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
mnesilochus, also in-law Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
moon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
new comedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
obscenity/vulgarism/vulgarity Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
opora, also cornucopia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
orchestra Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
peace / eirene (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
peisetaerus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
personification of abstract notions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
prometheus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
sacrifice' Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
slave Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
strip Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
theoria, also holiday, show-time Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
triballian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
trygaeus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
war (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
wealth (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105