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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1207
Aristophanes, Peace, 523-657
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ἐκεινονὶ γοῦν τὸν λοφοποιὸν οὐχ ὁρᾷςHERMES: Ah! good gods! look at that poor crest-maker, tearing at his hair, and at that pike-maker, who has just broken wind in yon sword-cutler's face. TRYGAEUS: And do you see with what pleasure this sickle-maker is making long noses at the spear-maker? HERMES: Now ask the husbandmen to be off. TRYGAEUS: Listen, good folk! Let the husbandmen take their farming tools and return to their fields as quick as possible, but without either sword, spear or javelin. All is as quiet as if Peace had been reigning for a century. Come, let everyone go till the earth, singing the Paean. CHORUS: Oh, thou, whom men of standing desired and who art good to husbandmen, I have gazed upon thee with delight; and now I go to greet my vines, to caress after so long an absence the fig trees I planted in my youth. TRYGAEUS: Friends, let us first adore the goddess, who has delivered us from crests and Gorgons; then let us hurry to our farms, having first bought a nice little piece of salt fish to eat in the fields. HERMES: By Poseidon! what a fine crew they make and dense as the crust of a cake; they are as nimble as guests on their way to a feast. TRYGAEUS: See, how their iron spades glitter and how beautifully their three-pronged mattocks glisten in the sun! How regularly they will align the plants! I also burn myself to go into the country and to turn over the earth I have so long neglected. — Friends, do you remember the happy life that peace afforded us formerly; can you recall the splendid baskets of figs, both fresh and dried, the myrtles, the sweet wine, the violets blooming near the spring, and the olives, for which we have wept so much? Worship, adore the goddess for restoring you so many blessings. CHORUS: Hail! hail! thou beloved divinity! thy return overwhelms us with joy. When far from thee, my ardent wish to see my fields again made me pine with regret. From thee came all blessings. Oh! much desired Peace! thou art the sole support of those who spend their lives tilling the earth. Under thy rule we had a thousand delicious enjoyments at our beck; thou wert the husbandman's wheaten cake and his safeguard. So that our vineyards, our young fig-tree woods and all our plantations hail thee with delight and smile at thy coming. But where was she then, I wonder, all the long time she spent away from us? Hermes, thou benevolent god, tell us! HERMES: Wise husbandmen, hearken to my words, if you want to know why she was lost to you. The start of our misfortunes was the exile of Phidias; Pericles feared he might share his ill-luck, he mistrusted your peevish nature and, to prevent all danger to himself, he threw out that little spark, the Megarian decree, set the city aflame, and blew up the conflagration with a hurricane of war, so that the smoke drew tears from all Greeks both here and over there. At the very outset of this fire our vines were a-crackle, our casks knocked together; it was beyond the power of any man to stop the disaster, and Peace disappeared.
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ταῦτα τοίνυν μὰ τὸν ̓Απόλλω 'γὼ 'πεπύσμην οὐδενόςTRYGAEUS: That, by Apollo! is what no one ever told me; I could not think what connection there could be between Phidias and Peace. CHORUS: Nor I; I know it now. This accounts for her beauty, if she is related to him. There are so many things that escape us. HERMES: Then, when the towns subject to you saw that you were angered one against the other and were showing each other your teeth like dogs, they hatched a thousand plots to pay you no more dues and gained over the chief citizens of Sparta at the price of gold. They, being as shamelessly greedy as they were faithless in diplomacy, chased off Peace with ignominy to let loose War. Though this was profitable to them, 'twas the ruin of the husbandmen, who were innocent of all blame; for, in revenge, your galleys went out to devour their figs. TRYGAEUS: And 'twas with justice too; did they not break down my black fig tree, which I had planted and dunged with my own hands? CHORUS: Yes, by Zeus! yes, 'twas well done; the wretches broke a chest for me with stones, which held six medimni of corn. HERMES: Then the rural labourers flocked into the city and let themselves be bought over like the others. Not having even a grape-stone to munch and longing after their figs, they looked towards the orators. These well knew that the poor were driven to extremity and lacked even bread; but they nevertheless drove away the Goddess each time she reappeared in answer to the wish of the country with their loud shrieks, that were as sharp as pitchforks; furthermore, they attacked the well-filled purses of the richest among our allies on the pretence that they belonged to Brasidas' party. And then you would tear the poor accused wretch to pieces with your teeth; for the city, all pale with hunger and cowed with terror, gladly snapped up any calumny that was thrown it to devour. So the strangers, seeing what terrible blows the informers dealt, sealed their lips with gold. They grew rich, while you, alas! you could only see that Greece was going to ruin. 'Twas the tanner who was the author of all this woe. TRYGAEUS: Enough said, Hermes, leave that man in Hades, whither he has gone; he no longer belongs to us, but rather to yourself. That he was a cheat, a braggart, a calumniator when alive, why, nothing could be truer; but anything you might say now would be an insult to one of your own folk. Oh! venerated Goddess! why art thou silent? HERMES: And how could she speak to the spectators? She is too angry at all that they have made her suffer. TRYGAEUS: At least let her speak a little to you, Hermes. HERMES: Tell me, my dear, what are your feelings with regard to them? Come, you relentless foe of all bucklers, speak; I am listening to you. (Peace whispers into Hermes' ear.) Is that your grievance against them? Yes, yes, I understand. Hearken, you folk, this is her complaint. She says, that after the affair of Pylos she came to you unbidden to bring you a basket full of truces and that you thrice repulsed her by your votes in the assembly.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Aristophanes, Birds, 1516-1524, 1527, 1536-1552, 186, 1515 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1515. ἐξ οὗπερ ὑμεῖς ᾠκίσατε τὸν ἀέρα.
2. Aristophanes, Peace, 211-212, 371, 403-438, 444-446, 469, 524-728, 742-747, 752-760, 762-763, 773-780, 796-804, 835-840, 864, 871-876, 879, 887-895, 204 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

204. ̔́Ελλησιν ὀργισθέντες. εἶτ' ἐνταῦθα μὲν
3. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1113-1116, 1118-1170, 1112 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1112. ἡμᾶς; ὁτιὴ δεινότατα πάντων πραγμάτων
4. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 60-62, 59 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

59. ὃς ἕτοιμος σοῦ τοῦ τε ποιητοῦ


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agathon Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
amphitryo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
asclepius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
barbarians Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
chorus, cf. choregia, choregos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
council, cf. boule councilors/bouleutai Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
cremylus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
demos Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
dionysus, dionysiac (rites, farce etc.) Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
euripides Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
food Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
hermes Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79, 105
inspiration Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
messenger Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
mnesilochus, also in-law Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
moon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
myth Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
new comedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79, 105
obscenity/vulgarism/vulgarity Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
old comedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
opora, also cornucopia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
orchestra Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
peace / eirene (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
peisetaerus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
personification of abstract notions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
plot Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
prometheus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
sacrifice Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
satyr play' Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
silenus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 79
slave Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
strip Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
theoria, also holiday, show-time Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
triballian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
trygaeus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 282
war (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105
wealth (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 105