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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1207
Aristophanes, Peace, 1052-1126
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ὀπτα σὺ σιγῇ κἄπαγ' ἀπὸ τῆς ὀσφύος.TRYGAEUS (to the servant). Silence! — (Aloud.) Look after the roasting and keep your hands off the meat. HIEROCLES: To whom are you sacrificing? Answer me. Ah! the tail is showing favourable omens. SERVANT: Aye, very favourable, oh, loved and mighty Peace! HIEROCLES: Come, cut off the first offering and make the oblation. TRYGAEUS: 'Tis not roasted enough. HIEROCLES: Yea, truly, 'tis done to a turn. TRYGAEUS: Mind your own business, friend! (To the servant.) Cut away. Where is the table? Bring the libations. HIEROCLES: The tongue is cut separately. TRYGAEUS: We know all that. But just listen to one piece of advice. HIEROCLES: And that is?
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ἀλλ' οἶσθ' ὃ δρᾶσον; ἢν φράσῃς. μὴ διαλέγουTRYGAEUS: Don't talk, for 'tis divine Peace to whom we are sacrificing. HIEROCLES: Oh! wretched mortals, oh, you idiots! TRYGAEUS: Keep such ugly terms for yourself. HIEROCLES: What! you are so ignorant you don't understand the will of the gods and you make a treaty, you, who are men, with apes, who are full of malice! TRYGAEUS: Ha, ha, ha! HIEROCLES: What are you laughing at? TRYGAEUS: Ha, ha! your apes amuse me! HIEROCLES: You simple pigeons, you trust yourselves to foxes, who are all craft, both in mind and heart. TRYGAEUS: Oh, you trouble-maker! may your lungs get as hot as this meat! HIEROCLES: Nay, nay! if only the Nymphs had not fooled Bacis, and Bacis mortal men; and if the Nymphs had not tricked Bacis a second time....
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ἀλλ' οὔπω τοῦτ' ἐστὶ φίλον μακάρεσσι θεοῖσιν:TRYGAEUS: No, the blessed gods won't allow it yet; let us drink; and as for you, get you gone, for 'tis their will. Mighty Peace! stay ever in our midst. HIEROCLES: Bring the tongue hither. TRYGAEUS: Relieve us of your own. HIEROCLES: The libation. TRYGAEUS: Here! and this into the bargain (strikes him). HIEROCLES: You will not give me any meat? TRYGAEUS: We cannot give you any until the wolf unites with the sheep. HIEROCLES: I will embrace your knees. TRYGAEUS: 'Tis lost labour, good fellow; you will never smooth the rough spikes of the hedgehog.... Come, spectators, join us in our feast. HIEROCLES: And what am I to do?
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μετὰ νῷν. τί δὴ 'γώ; τὴν Σίβυλλαν ἔσθιε.TRYGAEUS: You? go and eat the Sibyl. HIEROCLES: No, by the Earth! no, you shall not eat without me; if you do not give, I take; 'tis common property. TRYGAEUS (to the servant). Strike, strike this Bacis, this humbugging soothsayer. HIEROCLES: I take to witness.... TRYGAEUS: And I also, that you are a glutton and an impostor. Hold him tight and beat the impostor with a stick. SERVANT: You look to that; I will snatch the skin from him, which he has stolen from us. Are you going to let go that skin, you priest from hell! do you hear! Oh! what a fine crow has come from Oreus! Stretch your wings quickly for Elymnium.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

33 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.443-1.447, 1.452, 1.458-1.466, 1.474, 2.404-2.407, 2.412-2.431 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.443. /and place in the arms of her dear father, saying to him:Chryses, Agamemnon, king of men, sent me forth to bring to you your daughter, and to offer to Phoebus a holy hecatomb on the Danaans' behalf, that therewith we may propitiate the lord, who has now brought upon the Argives woeful lamentation. 1.444. /and place in the arms of her dear father, saying to him:Chryses, Agamemnon, king of men, sent me forth to bring to you your daughter, and to offer to Phoebus a holy hecatomb on the Danaans' behalf, that therewith we may propitiate the lord, who has now brought upon the Argives woeful lamentation. 1.445. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.446. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.447. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.452. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.458. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.459. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Then, when they had prayed, and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads, and cut their throats, and flayed them, and cut out the thighs and covered them 1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.464. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.465. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.466. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.474. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 2.404. /And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host 2.405. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.406. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.407. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.412. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.413. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.414. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.415. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.416. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.417. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.418. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.419. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. So spake he; but not as yet would the son of Cronos grant him fulfillment; 2.420. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.421. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.422. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.423. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.424. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.425. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.426. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.427. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.428. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.429. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.430. /Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 2.431. /Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.430-3.463, 3.472, 14.434-14.436 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1255, 1254 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1254. καὶ μὴν ἄγαν γʼ Ἕλληνʼ ἐπίσταμαι φάτιν. Χορός 1254. For Puthian oracles, thy speech, and hard too. KASSANDRA
4. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 7.42-7.43 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 246-249, 148 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

148. ὁ δ' ὤμοσε σπένδων βοηθήσειν ἔχων
6. Aristophanes, Birds, 1022-1054, 521, 848-903, 954-955, 958-991, 1021 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1021. ποῦ πρόξενοι; τίς ὁ Σαρδανάπαλλος οὑτοσί;
7. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, 1013, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1012. ἀναγκάσει τουτί σε. τοῦτο δ' ἔστι τί;
8. Aristophanes, Knights, 1001-1111, 116-122, 1229, 123, 1230-1239, 124, 1240-1249, 125, 1250-1253, 126-149, 194-209, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. καὶ νὴ Δί' ἔτι γέ μοὔστι κιβωτὸς πλέα.
9. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 763-780, 762 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

762. ὦ δαιμόνιαι παύσασθε τῶν τερατευμάτων.
10. Aristophanes, Clouds, 251, 274, 332, 250 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

250. βούλει τὰ θεῖα πράγματ' εἰδέναι σαφῶς
11. Aristophanes, Peace, 1009, 1013-1014, 1019, 1023-1051, 1053-1126, 1172-1178, 1186, 1229, 1253, 1264, 1275, 1290, 433, 960, 962-963, 976, 978-987, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1005. καὶ Κωπᾴδων ἐλθεῖν σπυρίδας
12. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1067-1069, 1074, 1096-1126, 1136-1138, 677-678, 820, 1044 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1044. τάλαιν' ἐγὼ τῆς ὕβρεος ἧς ὑβρίζομαι.
13. Aristophanes, Wasps, 380, 160 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

160. ὅταν τις ἐκφύγῃ μ' ἀποσκλῆναι τότε.
14. Euripides, Andromache, 1101-1117, 1100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1100. ἡμεῖς δὲ μῆλα, φυλλάδος Παρνασίας
15. Euripides, Electra, 714-726, 785-814, 823, 713 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

713. θυμέλαι δ' ἐπίτναντο χρυ- 713. The altars of beaten gold were set out; and through the town the
16. Euripides, Helen, 1576 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1576. βοῆς κελευστοῦ φθέγμαθ' ὡς ἠκούσαμεν.
17. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 923-930, 922 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

922. Victims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.
18. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1578-1583, 1577 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Herodotus, Histories, 1.46-1.49, 4.150-4.151, 6.19.2-6.19.3, 7.6, 7.6.4 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.46. After the loss of his son, Croesus remained in deep sorrow for two years. After this time, the destruction by Cyrus son of Cambyses of the sovereignty of Astyages son of Cyaxares, and the growth of the power of the Persians, distracted Croesus from his mourning; and he determined, if he could, to forestall the increase of the Persian power before they became great. ,Having thus determined, he at once made inquiries of the Greek and Libyan oracles, sending messengers separately to Delphi, to Abae in Phocia, and to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius, and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. ,These are the Greek oracles to which Croesus sent for divination: and he told others to go inquire of Ammon in Libya . His intent in sending was to test the knowledge of the oracles, so that, if they were found to know the truth, he might send again and ask if he should undertake an expedition against the Persians. 1.47. And when he sent to test these shrines he gave the Lydians these instructions: they were to keep track of the time from the day they left Sardis, and on the hundredth day inquire of the oracles what Croesus, king of Lydia, son of Alyattes, was doing then; then they were to write down whatever the oracles answered and bring the reports back to him. ,Now none relate what answer was given by the rest of the oracles. But at Delphi, no sooner had the Lydians entered the hall to inquire of the god and asked the question with which they were entrusted, than the Pythian priestess uttered the following hexameter verses: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"“I know the number of the grains of sand and the extent of the sea, /l lAnd understand the mute and hear the voiceless. /l lThe smell has come to my senses of a strong-shelled tortoise /l lBoiling in a cauldron together with a lamb's flesh, /l lUnder which is bronze and over which is bronze.” /l /quote 1.48. Having written down this inspired utterance of the Pythian priestess, the Lydians went back to Sardis . When the others as well who had been sent to various places came bringing their oracles, Croesus then unfolded and examined all the writings. Some of them in no way satisfied him. But when he read the Delphian message, he acknowledged it with worship and welcome, considering Delphi as the only true place of divination, because it had discovered what he himself had done. ,For after sending his envoys to the oracles, he had thought up something which no conjecture could discover, and carried it out on the appointed day: namely, he had cut up a tortoise and a lamb, and then boiled them in a cauldron of bronze covered with a lid of the same. 1.49. Such, then, was the answer from Delphi delivered to Croesus. As to the reply which the Lydians received from the oracle of Amphiaraus when they had followed the due custom of the temple, I cannot say what it was, for nothing is recorded of it, except that Croesus believed that from this oracle too he had obtained a true answer. 4.150. So far in the story the Lacedaemonian and Theraean records agree; for the rest, we have only the word of the Theraeans. ,Grinnus son of Aesanius, king of Thera, a descendant of this same Theras, came to Delphi bringing a hecatomb from his city; among others of his people, Battus son of Polymnestus came with him, a descendant of Euphemus of the Minyan clan. ,When Grinnus king of Thera asked the oracle about other matters, the priestess' answer was that he should found a city in Libya. “Lord, I am too old and heavy to stir; command one of these younger men to do this,” answered Grinnus, pointing to Battus as he spoke. ,No more was said then. But when they departed, they neglected to obey the oracle, since they did not know where Libya was, and were afraid to send a colony out to an uncertain destination. 4.151. For seven years after this there was no rain in Thera; all the trees in the island except one withered. The Theraeans inquired at Delphi again, and the priestess mentioned the colony they should send to Libya. ,So, since there was no remedy for their ills, they sent messengers to Crete to find any Cretan or traveller there who had travelled to Libya. In their travels about the island, these came to the town of Itanus, where they met a murex fisherman named Corobius, who told them that he had once been driven off course by winds to Libya, to an island there called Platea. ,They hired this man to come with them to Thera; from there, just a few men were sent aboard ship to spy out the land first; guided by Corobius to the aforesaid island Platea, these left him there with provision for some months, and themselves sailed back with all speed to Thera to bring news of the island. 6.19.2. I will mention the part concerning the Argives when I come to that part of my history; this was the prophecy given to the Milesians in their absence: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Then, Miletus, contriver of evil deeds, /l lFor many will you become a banquet and glorious gifts; /l lYour wives will wash the feet of many long-haired men; /l lOther ministers will tend my Didyman shrine! /l /quote 6.19.3. All this now came upon the Milesians, since most of their men were slain by the Persians, who wore long hair, and their women and children were accounted as slaves, and the temple at Didyma with its shrine and place of divination was plundered and burnt. of the wealth that was in this temple I have often spoken elsewhere in my history. 7.6. He said this because he desired adventures and wanted to be governor of Hellas. Finally he worked on Xerxes and persuaded him to do this, and other things happened that helped him to persuade Xerxes. ,Messengers came from Thessaly from the Aleuadae (who were princes of Thessaly) and invited the king into Hellas with all earnestness; the Pisistratidae who had come up to Susa used the same pleas as the Aleuadae, offering Xerxes even more than they did. ,They had come up to Sardis with Onomacritus, an Athenian diviner who had set in order the oracles of Musaeus. They had reconciled their previous hostility with him; Onomacritus had been banished from Athens by Pisistratus' son Hipparchus, when he was caught by Lasus of Hermione in the act of interpolating into the writings of Musaeus an oracle showing that the islands off Lemnos would disappear into the sea. ,Because of this Hipparchus banished him, though they had previously been close friends. Now he had arrived at Susa with the Pisistratidae, and whenever he came into the king's presence they used lofty words concerning him and he recited from his oracles; all that portended disaster to the Persian he left unspoken, choosing and reciting such prophecies as were most favorable, telling how the Hellespont must be bridged by a man of Persia and describing the expedition. ,So he brought his oracles to bear, while the Pisistratidae and Aleuadae gave their opinions. 7.6.4. Because of this Hipparchus banished him, though they had previously been close friends. Now he had arrived at Susa with the Pisistratidae, and whenever he came into the king's presence they used lofty words concerning him and he recited from his oracles; all that portended disaster to the Persian he left unspoken, choosing and reciting such prophecies as were most favorable, telling how the Hellespont must be bridged by a man of Persia and describing the expedition.
20. Sophocles, Antigone, 1034-1047, 1055, 1061, 1033 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 299, 380-403, 298 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.8.2, 2.21.3, 8.1.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.8.2. Everywhere predictions were being recited and oracles being chanted by such persons as collect them, and this not only in the contending cities. 2.21.3. Knots were formed in the streets and engaged in hot discussion; for if the proposed sally was warmly recommended, it was also in some cases opposed. Oracles of the most various import were recited by the collectors, and found eager listeners in one or other of the disputants. Foremost in pressing for the sally were the Acharnians, as constituting no small part of the army of the state, and as it was their land that was being ravaged. In short, the whole city was in a most excited state; Pericles was the object of general indignation; his previous counsels were totally forgotten; he was abused for not leading out the army which he commanded, and was made responsible for the whole of the public suffering. 8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens, for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily .
23. Menander, Dyscolus, 405, 407-418, 432, 494, 404 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

24. Plutarch, Against Colotes, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Plutarch, Agesilaus, 3.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Plutarch, On Talkativeness, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Plutarch, Pericles, 32.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

32.2. The people accepted with delight these slanders, and so, while they were in this mood, a bill was passed, on motion of Dracontides, that Pericles should deposit his accounts of public moneys with the prytanes, and that the jurors should decide upon his case with ballots which had lain upon the altar of the goddess on the acropolis. But Hagnon amended this clause of the bill with the motion that the case be tried before fifteen hundred jurors in the ordinary way, whether one wanted to call it a prosecution for embezzlement and bribery, or malversation.
29. Plutarch, Precepts of Statecraft, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

812d. So Pericles made use of Menippus for the position of general, humbled the Council of the Areopagus by means of Ephialtes, passed the decree against the Megarians by means of Charinus, and sent Lampon out as founder of Thurii. For, when power seems to be distributed among many, not only does the weight of hatreds and enmities become less troublesome, but there is also greater efficiency in the conduct of affairs. For just as the division of the hand into fingers does not make it weak, but renders it a more skillful instrument for use, so the statesman who gives to others a share in the government
30. Lucian, Sacrifices, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.14.1, 4.27.4, 10.32.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.14.1. On going westwards from the market-place is a cenotaph of Brasidas the son of Tellis. died 422 B.C. Not far from it is the theater, made of white marble and worth seeing. Opposite the theater are two tombs; the first is that of Pausanias, the general at Plataea, the second is that of Leonidas. Every year they deliver speeches over them, and hold a contest in which none may compete except Spartans. The bones of Leonidas were taken by Pausanias from Thermopylae forty years after the battle. There is set up a slab with the names, and their fathers' names, of those who endured the fight at Thermopylae against the Persians. 4.27.4. Epaminondas was most strongly drawn to the foundation by the oracles of Bacis, who was inspired by the Nymphs and left prophecies regarding others of the Greeks as well as the return of the Messenians: Then indeed shall the bright bloom of Sparta perish and Messene again shall be inhabited for all time. I have discovered that Bacis also told in what manner Eira would be captured, and this too is one of his oracles: The men of Messene o'ercome by the thunder's roll and spouting rain. 10.32.7. But the Corycian cave exceeds in size those I have mentioned, and it is possible to make one's way through the greater part of it even without lights. The roof stands at a sufficient height from the floor, and water, rising in part from springs but still more dripping from the roof, has made clearly visible the marks of drops on the floor throughout the cave. The dwellers around Parnassus believe it to be sacred to the Corycian nymphs, and especially to Pan. From the Corycian cave it is difficult even for an active walker to reach the heights of Parnassus . The heights are above the clouds, and the Thyiad women rave there in honor of Dionysus and Apollo.
32. Epigraphy, Ig, 1234

33. Epigraphy, Ml, 52, 73, 26



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegisthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
agonothetai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
alcibiades Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
archaic greek (sibyl) Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
archons, eponymous Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
aristophanes, on hierokles and lampon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 255, 258
aristophanes Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
aristophanes ridicule of seers in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
atheism, decree of diopeithes against Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
athena Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
athenians, dedications of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
atreus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
azande people, sudan, poison oracle Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
bakis Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
burkert, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
callimachus of athens Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
chresmologoi Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
cicero Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
corinthians Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
cultural hybridity Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
dedications, after marathon Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
dedications, after plataea Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
detienne, m. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
dialectic Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
diopeithes Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
divination, not admitted in court role in public life Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
divination, not admitted in court through chresmologoi Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
euboia Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 255
euripides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
eusebeia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
gods (egyptian, greek, and roman), apollon Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
hierokles Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 255, 258
hipparchs Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
lampon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 255, 258
leonidas of sparta Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
leto, goddess, of corinth Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
metaphysics Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
neoptolemus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
nestor Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
olympia, dedications at Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
onchestos, boiotia Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
onomakritos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 255
oracles, responses adduced in assembly Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
orthodoxy Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
pax romana Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
philosophy Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50, 124
pisistratos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 255
poseidon, sanctuary at onchestos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
priests and priestesses, of asclepius, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses, of thesmophoroi at melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
prophecy Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
prytaneis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
pylos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
pythia of delphi Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
ritual Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
robertson smith, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
sacrifice, beauty of' Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
sacrifice Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
satire Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
simonides of ceos Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 213
socrates Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
sparta Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
theano Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
theon Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
thesaurus cultus et rituum antiquorum Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
thesmophoroi of melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
thucydides son of olorus religious motifs in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 113
trojans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
troy Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
truth Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 50
vernant, j.-p. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
xuthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78