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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1207
Aristophanes, Peace, 1031
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

30 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.446-1.474 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.446. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.447. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.448. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.449. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.450. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.451. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.452. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.453. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.454. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.455. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.456. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.457. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.458. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.459. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Then, when they had prayed, and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads, and cut their throats, and flayed them, and cut out the thighs and covered them 1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.464. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.465. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.466. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.467. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.468. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.469. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.470. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.471. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.472. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.473. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 1.474. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.420, 3.436-3.463, 14.414-14.445 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1255, 1254 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1254. καὶ μὴν ἄγαν γʼ Ἕλληνʼ ἐπίσταμαι φάτιν. Χορός 1254. For Puthian oracles, thy speech, and hard too. KASSANDRA
4. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 7.42-7.43 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 246-249, 148 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

148. ὁ δ' ὤμοσε σπένδων βοηθήσειν ἔχων
6. Aristophanes, Birds, 1516-1524, 716, 848-903, 958-991, 1515 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1515. ἐξ οὗπερ ὑμεῖς ᾠκίσατε τὸν ἀέρα.
7. Aristophanes, Knights, 1001-1111, 194-209, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. καὶ νὴ Δί' ἔτι γέ μοὔστι κιβωτὸς πλέα.
8. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 763-780, 762 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

762. ὦ δαιμόνιαι παύσασθε τῶν τερατευμάτων.
9. Aristophanes, Clouds, 274 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

274. ὑπακούσατε δεξάμεναι θυσίαν καὶ τοῖς ἱεροῖσι χαρεῖσαι.
10. Aristophanes, Peace, 1009, 1013-1014, 1017-1021, 1023-1030, 1032-1126, 1172-1178, 1186, 1229, 1253, 1264, 1275, 1290, 433, 960, 962-963, 973-987, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1005. καὶ Κωπᾴδων ἐλθεῖν σπυρίδας
11. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1137-1138, 677-678, 820, 1136 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1136. εἴ μοι πορίσας ἄρτον τιν' εὖ πεπεμμένον
12. Euripides, Andromache, 1101-1117, 1100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1100. ἡμεῖς δὲ μῆλα, φυλλάδος Παρνασίας
13. Euripides, Electra, 714-726, 781-843, 713 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

713. θυμέλαι δ' ἐπίτναντο χρυ- 713. The altars of beaten gold were set out; and through the town the
14. Euripides, Helen, 1560-1589, 1559 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1559. μὴ θιγγάνειν ἀπεῖργεν. ὁ δ' ̔Ελένης πόσις
15. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 923-941, 922 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

922. Victims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.
16. Herodotus, Histories, 7.228 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.228. There is an inscription written over these men, who were buried where they fell, and over those who died before the others went away, dismissed by Leonidas. It reads as follows: quote type="inscription" l met="dact"Here four thousand from the Peloponnese once fought three million. /l /quote ,That inscription is for them all, but the Spartans have their own: quote type="inscription" l met="dact"Foreigner, go tell the Spartans that we lie here obedient to their commands. /l /quote ,That one is to the Lacedaemonians, this one to the seer: quote type="inscription" l met="dact"This is a monument to the renowned Megistias, /l lSlain by the Medes who crossed the Spercheius river. /l lThe seer knew well his coming doom, /l lBut endured not to abandon the leaders of Sparta. /l /quote ,Except for the seer's inscription, the Amphictyons are the ones who honored them by erecting inscriptions and pillars. That of the seer Megistias was inscribed by Simonides son of Leoprepes because of his tie of guest-friendship with the man.
17. Isaeus, Orations, 8.15-8.16 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Lysias, Against Andocides, 450 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

738c. the advice from Delphi or Dodona or Ammon, or that of ancient sayings, whatever form they take—whether derived from visions or from some reported inspiration from heaven. By this advice they instituted sacrifices combined with rites, either of native origin or imported from Tuscany or Cyprus or elsewhere; and by means of such sayings they sanctified oracles and statues and altars and temples, and marked off for each of them sacred glebes. Nothing of all these
20. Sophocles, Antigone, 1006-1011, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 7.50.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.50.4. All was at last ready, and they were on the point of sailing away, when an eclipse of the moon, which was then at the full, took place. Most of the Athenians, deeply impressed by this occurrence, now urged the generals to wait; and Nicias, who was somewhat over-addicted to divination and practices of that kind, refused from that moment even to take the question of departure into consideration, until they had waited the thrice nine days prescribed by the soothsayers. The besiegers were thus condemned to stay in the country;
22. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 5.6.29, 6.1.22-6.1.24, 6.4.14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.1.22. Quite unable as he was to decide the question, it seemed best to him to consult the gods; and he accordingly brought two victims to the altar and proceeded to offer sacrifice to King Zeus, the very god that the oracle at Delphi had prescribed for him; cp. Xen. Anab. 3.1.5 ff. and it was likewise from this god, as he believed, that the dream cp. Xen. Anab. 3.1.11 f. came which he had at the time when he took the first steps toward assuming a share in the charge of the army. 6.1.23. Moreover, he recalled that when he was setting out from Ephesus to be introduced to Cyrus, cp. Xen. Anab. 3.1.8 . an eagle screamed upon his right; it was sitting, however, and the soothsayer who was conducting him said that while the omen was one suited to the great rather than to an ordinary person, and while it betokened glory, it nevertheless portended suffering, for the reason that other birds are most apt to attack the eagle when it is sitting; still, he said, the omen did not betoken gain, for it is rather while the eagle is on the wing that it gets its food. 6.1.24. So it was, then, that Xenophon made sacrifice, and the god signified to him quite clearly that he should neither strive for the command nor accept it in case he should be chosen. Such was the issue of this matter. 6.4.14. and they accordingly ceased their offerings for that day. Now some people had the effrontery to say that Xenophon, in his desire to found a city at this spot, had induced the soothsayer to declare that the sacrifices were not favourable for departure.
23. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 1.6.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.6.2. My son, it is evident both from the sacrifices and from the signs from the skies that the gods are sending you forth with their grace and favour; and you yourself must recognize it, for I had you taught this art on purpose that you might not have to learn the counsels of the gods through others as interpreters, but that you yourself, both seeing what is to be seen and hearing what is to be heard, might understand; for I would not have you at the mercy of the soothsayers, in case they should wish to deceive you by saying other things than those revealed by the gods; and furthermore, if ever you should be without a soothsayer, I would not have you in doubt as to what to make of the divine revelations, but by your soothsayer’s art I would have you understand the counsels of the gods and obey them.
24. Menander, Dyscolus, 494 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

25. Plutarch, Against Colotes, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Plutarch, Cimon, 18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Plutarch, On Talkativeness, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

29. Plutarch, Nicias, 23.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

30. Epigraphy, Seg, 29.361



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegisthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
agonothetai Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
alcibiades Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 436
alexander the great Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
alkibiades Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
ammon (egypt), oracle Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
archons, eponymous Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
areopagos, consults oracle at ammon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
aristandros Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
aristophanes Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
athena Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
atreus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
attica Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 436
balaam Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
burkert, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
cicero Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
detienne, m. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
dialectic Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
eagle, and snake Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
euripides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
eusebeia Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
gods (egyptian, greek, and roman), apollon Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
gytheion Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
herms Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 436
herodotos, on themistokles Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
hipparchs Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
kambyses, king of persia Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
kimon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
koina Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
kyros, persian king Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
lakonia Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
leonidas Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
megistias Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
melampous Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
mopsus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
neoptolemus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
nestor Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
nicias Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138; Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 436
nikias Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
pax romana Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
philip ii Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
plutarch, on ammon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
priests and priestesses, of asclepius, in city Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses, of thesmophoroi at melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
priests and priestesses Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
prytaneis Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
pylos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
robertson smith, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
sacrifice, beauty of Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
sacrifice Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
seers, as warriors' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
seers Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
sicilian expedition Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 436
sicily Rengakos and Tsakmakis, Brill's Companion to Thucydides (2006) 436
stilbides Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
strymon Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
telenikos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
telmessos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 138
theano Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
themistokles Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
theon Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
thesaurus cultus et rituum antiquorum Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
thesmophoroi of melite Mikalson, New Aspects of Religion in Ancient Athens: Honors, Authorities, Esthetics, and Society (2016) 19
thucydides, on oracle-peddlers Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
trojans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
troy Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
vernant, j.-p. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
xenophon, reads sacrifices Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 256
xuthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78