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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1205
Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 1


ἀλλ' εἴ τις ἐς Βακχεῖον αὐτὰς ἐκάλεσενLYSISTRATA (alone). Ah! if only they had been invited to a Bacchic revelling, or a feast of Pan or Aphrodite or Genetyllis, why! the streets would have been impassable for the thronging tambourines! Now there's never a woman here-ah! except my neighbour Calonice, whom I see approaching yonder.... Good day, Calonice. CALONICE: Good day, Lysistrata; but pray, why this dark, forbidding face, my dear? Believe me, you don't look a bit pretty with those black lowering brows. LYSISTRATA: Oh! Calonice, my heart is on fire; I blush for our sex. Men will have it we are tricky and sly.... CALONICE: And they are quite right, upon my word! LYSISTRATA: Yet, look you, when the women are summoned to meet for a matter of the last importance, they lie abed instead of coming. CALONICE: Oh! they will come, my dear; but 'tis not easy, you know, for women to leave the house. One is busy pottering about her husband; another is getting the servant up; a third is putting her child asleep, or washing the brat or feeding it. LYSISTRATA: But I tell you, the business that calls them here is far and away more urgent. CALONICE: And why do you summon us, dear Lysistrata? What is it all about? LYSISTRATA: About a big affair.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 178-179, 2-3, 36, 64, 7, 177 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

177. ταῖς πρεσβυτάταις γὰρ προστέτακται τοῦτο δρᾶν
2. Aristophanes, Peace, 420 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

420. μυστήρι' ̔Ερμῇ, Διιπόλει', ̓Αδώνια:
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 222-225, 470, 686-688, 221 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

221. πλήρεις δὲ θιάσοις ἐν μέσοισιν ἑστάναι
4. Euripides, Fragments, 954, 953 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Hippolytus, 954, 953 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Ion, 551-553, 550 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

550. Didst thou in days gone by come to the Pythian rock? Xuthu
7. Herodotus, Histories, 9.73 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9.73. of the Athenians, Sophanes son of Eutychides is said to have won renown, a man from the town of Decelea, whose people once did a deed that was of eternal value, as the Athenians themselves say. ,For in the past when the sons of Tyndarus were trying to recover Helen, after breaking into Attica with a great host, they turned the towns upside down because they did not know where Helen had been hidden, then (it is said) the Deceleans (and, as some say, Decelus himself, because he was angered by the pride of Theseus and feared for the whole land of Attica) revealed the whole matter to the sons of Tyndarus, and guided them to Aphidnae, which Titacus, one of the autochthonoi, handed over to to the Tyndaridae. ,For that deed the Deceleans have always had and still have freedom at Sparta from all dues and chief places at feasts. In fact, even as recently as the war which was waged many years after this time between the Athenians and Peloponnesians, the Lacedaemonians laid no hand on Decelea when they harried the rest of Attica.
8. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

815c. All the dancing that is of a Bacchic kind and cultivated by those who indulge in drunken imitations of Pans, Sileni and Satyrs (as they call them), when performing certain rites of expiation and initiation,—all this class of dancing cannot easily be defined either as pacific or as warlike, or as of any one distinct kind. The most correct way of defining it seems to me to be this—
9. Plato, Lysis, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

205c. but he only writes and relates things that the whole city sings of, recalling Democrates and the boy’s grandfather Lysis and all his ancestors, with their wealth and the horses they kept, and their victories at Delphi, the Isthmus, and Nemea, with chariot-teams and coursers, and, in addition, even hoarier antiquities than these. Only two days ago he was recounting to us in some poem of his the entertainment of Hercules,—how on account of his kinship with Hercules their forefather welcomed the hero
10. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

364e. And incense and libation turn their wills Praying, whenever they have sinned and made transgression. Hom. Il. 9.497 And they produce a bushel of books of Musaeus and Orpheus, the offspring of the Moon and of the Muses, as they affirm, and these books they use in their ritual, and make not only ordinary men but states believe that there really are remissions of sins and purifications for deeds of injustice, by means of sacrifice and pleasant sport for the living
11. Sophocles, Antigone, 1152, 1151 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 3.5 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.259, 19.199 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Theophrastus, Characters, 16.12 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

15. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 4.3.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.3.3.  Consequently in many Greek cities every other year Bacchic bands of women gather, and it is lawful for the maidens to carry the thyrsus and to join in the frenzied revelry, crying out "Euai!" and honouring the god; while the matrons, forming in groups, offer sacrifices to the god and celebrate his mysteries and, in general, extol with hymns the presence of Dionysus, in this manner acting the part of the Maenads who, as history records, were of old the companions of the god.
16. Livy, History, 39.8.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

17. Antoninus Liberalis, Collection of Metamorphoses, 10.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.1.5, 1.18.5, 1.24.4-1.24.5, 1.31.1-1.31.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1.5. Twenty stades away is the Coliad promontory; on to it, when the Persian fleet was destroyed, the wrecks were carried down by the waves. There is here an image of the Coliad Aphrodite, with the goddesses Genetyllides (Goddesses of Birth), as they are called. And I am of opinion that the goddesses of the Phocaeans in Ionia, whom they call Gennaides, are the same as those at Colias. On the way from Phalerum to Athens there is a temple of Hera with neither doors nor roof. Men say that Mardonius, son of Gobryas, burnt it. But the image there to-day is, as report goes, the work of Alcamenes fl. 440-400 B.C. So that this, at any rate, cannot have been damaged by the Persians. 1.18.5. Hard by is built a temple of Eileithyia, who they say came from the Hyperboreans to Delos and helped Leto in her labour; and from Delos the name spread to other peoples. The Delians sacrifice to Eileithyia and sing a hymn of Olen . But the Cretans suppose that Eileithyia was born at Auunisus in the Cnossian territory, and that Hera was her mother. Only among the Athenians are the wooden figures of Eileithyia draped to the feet. The women told me that two are Cretan, being offerings of Phaedra, and that the third, which is the oldest, Erysichthon brought from Delos . 1.24.4. and there are statues of Zeus, one made by Leochares See Paus. 1.1.3 . and one called Polieus (Urban), the customary mode of sacrificing to whom I will give without adding the traditional reason thereof. Upon the altar of Zeus Polieus they place barley mixed with wheat and leave it unguarded. The ox, which they keep already prepared for sacrifice, goes to the altar and partakes of the grain. One of the priests they call the ox-slayer, who kills the ox and then, casting aside the axe here according to the ritual runs away. The others bring the axe to trial, as though they know not the man who did the deed. 1.24.5. Their ritual, then, is such as I have described. As you enter the temple that they name the Parthenon, all the sculptures you see on what is called the pediment refer to the birth of Athena, those on the rear pediment represent the contest for the land between Athena and Poseidon. The statue itself is made of ivory and gold. On the middle of her helmet is placed a likeness of the Sphinx—the tale of the Sphinx I will give when I come to my description of Boeotia—and on either side of the helmet are griffins in relief. 1.31.1. The small parishes of Attica, which were founded severally as chance would have it, presented the following noteworthy features. At Alimus is a sanctuary of Demeter Lawgiver and of the Maid, and at Zoster (Girdle) on the coast is an altar to Athena, as well as to Apollo, to Artemis and to Leto. The story is that Leto did not give birth to her children here, but loosened her girdle with a view to her delivery, and the place received its name from this incident. Prospalta has also a sanctuary of the Maid and Demeter, and Anagyrus a sanctuary of the Mother of the gods. At Cephale the chief cult is that of the Dioscuri, for the in habitants call them the Great gods. 1.31.2. At Prasiae is a temple of Apollo. Hither they say are sent the first-fruits of the Hyperboreans, and the Hyperboreans are said to hand them over to the Arimaspi, the Arimaspi to the Issedones, from these the Scythians bring them to Sinope, thence they are carried by Greeks to Prasiae, and the Athenians take them to Delos . The first-fruits are hidden in wheat straw, and they are known of none. There is at Prasiae a monument to Erysichthon, who died on the voyage home from Delos, after the sacred mission thither.
19. Pollux, Onomasticon, 8.108 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

20. Epigraphy, Lsam, 48

21. Epigraphy, Seg, 33.147



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adonia Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 284
altar Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
anthesteria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
aphrodite, genetyllis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 924
aphrodite Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 24
aristophanes, on bacchic cult Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
athena, technical skills Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 24
athena Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 24
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
bacchants Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
basilinna βασίλιννα Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
chabrias Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
comedy, comic technique Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
crown, on tombstone Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 924
cults, mysteries Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
dadouchos δᾳδοῦχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
delphi Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23
demeter, and kore Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 924
democracy, democratic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
democracy/democratic Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
diakria Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
dionysos, dionysos limnaios/en lymnais Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
dionysos, dionysos ploutodotes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
dionysus Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
dioskouroi Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
divides year with apollo? and women Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divides year with apollo? iconographic retinue Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
divides year with apollo? private rites for Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
dokimasia Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
epakreis, epakria Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
ephesus, ephesian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
euthyna Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
female, rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
gerarai γεραραί Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
goddesses, textile work Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 24
gynaeconitis Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
hades god Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
hekatostai records Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
helen Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
herakles, in demes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
horos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
household Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
initiations (private cults) Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
kolieis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 924
lenaeans, lenai λῆναι Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
lenaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
loutrophoros Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 924
maenads Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24; Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
minyas, daughters of Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 24
mother elective cults of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
old age Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 924
peisistratos, and attika Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
politics Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
possession, dionysiac Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23
priestess Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
priests, of mystery cults Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 112
race Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
religion, dionysiac Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
religion, feminine ritual language Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
religion, relationships with gods Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
religion Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
rite, ritual, female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
ritual Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 23, 24
sabazius Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
sacrifice, sacrificial Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
scrutiny Kapparis, Women in the Law Courts of Classical Athens (2021) 19
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
solon, solonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
technical skills Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 24
tetrapolis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
textile work, goddesses'" '458.0_24.0@wife, athena and Brule, Women of Ancient Greece (2003) 24
theseus, dioskouroi and helen Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
thesmophoria/on Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
thesmothetes Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 924
thyiads, thyiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
torch, torchlight Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
tritopateres/patreis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655
tyranny Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 115
women and dionysus Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
women festivals of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 284
women private festivals of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 284, 325
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi and dionysus Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 325
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi festivals of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 284
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi private festivals of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 284, 325
zeus, kataibates Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 655