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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1202
Aristophanes, Knights, 1114
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 441-444, 440 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

440. δεῖ γάρ με δόξαι πτωχὸν εἶναι τήμερον
2. Aristophanes, Knights, 1095-1113, 1115-1150, 1166-1181, 1186-1187, 1209-1210, 1225-1234, 267-268, 797, 1094 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1094. εἶτα κατασπένδειν κατὰ τῆς κεφαλῆς ἀρυβάλλῳ
3. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1075, 1074 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1074. O house, I would thou couldst speak for me and witness if I am so vile! Theseu
4. Herodotus, Histories, 5.78, 7.139, 8.143.2, 9.11, 9.119-9.120 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.78. So the Athenians grew in power and proved, not in one respect only but in all, that equality is a good thing. Evidence for this is the fact that while they were under tyrannical rulers, the Athenians were no better in war than any of their neighbors, yet once they got rid of their tyrants, they were by far the best of all. This, then, shows that while they were oppressed, they were, as men working for a master, cowardly, but when they were freed, each one was eager to achieve for himself. 7.139. Here I am forced to declare an opinion which will be displeasing to most, but I will not refrain from saying what seems to me to be true. ,Had the Athenians been panic-struck by the threatened peril and left their own country, or had they not indeed left it but remained and surrendered themselves to Xerxes, none would have attempted to withstand the king by sea. What would have happened on land if no one had resisted the king by sea is easy enough to determine. ,Although the Peloponnesians had built not one but many walls across the Isthmus for their defense, they would nevertheless have been deserted by their allies (these having no choice or free will in the matter, but seeing their cities taken one by one by the foreign fleet), until at last they would have stood alone. They would then have put up quite a fight and perished nobly. ,Such would have been their fate. Perhaps, however, when they saw the rest of Hellas siding with the enemy, they would have made terms with Xerxes. In either case Hellas would have been subdued by the Persians, for I cannot see what advantage could accrue from the walls built across the isthmus, while the king was master of the seas. ,As it is, to say that the Athenians were the saviors of Hellas is to hit the truth. It was the Athenians who held the balance; whichever side they joined was sure to prevail. choosing that Greece should preserve her freedom, the Athenians roused to battle the other Greek states which had not yet gone over to the Persians and, after the gods, were responsible for driving the king off. ,Nor were they moved to desert Hellas by the threatening oracles which came from Delphi and sorely dismayed them, but they stood firm and had the courage to meet the invader of their country. 8.143.2. Now carry this answer back to Mardonius from the Athenians, that as long as the sun holds the course by which he now goes, we will make no agreement with Xerxes. We will fight against him without ceasing, trusting in the aid of the gods and the heroes whom he has disregarded and burnt their houses and their adornments. 9.11. So Pausanias' army had marched away from Sparta; but as soon as it was day, the envoys came before the ephors, having no knowledge of the expedition, and being minded themselves too to depart each one to his own place. When they arrived, “You Lacedaemonians,” they said, “remain where you are, observing your dateHyacinthia /date and celebrating, leaving your allies deserted. For the wrong that you do them and for lack of allies, the Athenians, will make their peace with the Persian as best they can,,and thereafter, in so far as we will be king's allies, we will march with him against whatever land his men lead us. Then will you learn what the issue of this matter will be for you.” In response to this the ephors swore to them that they believed their army to be even now at Orestheum, marching against the “strangers,” as they called the barbarians. ,Having no knowledge of this, the envoys questioned them further as to the meaning of this and thereby learned the whole truth; they marvelled at this and hastened with all speed after the army. With them went five thousand men-at-arms of the Lacedaemonian countrymen. 9.119. As Oeobazus was making his escape into Thrace, the Apsinthians of that country caught and sacrificed him in their customary manner to Plistorus the god of their land; as for his companions, they did away with them by other means. ,Artayctes and his company had begun their flight later, and were overtaken a little way beyond the Goat's Rivers, where after they had defended themselves a long time, some of them were killed and the rest taken alive. The Greeks bound them and carried them to Sestus, and together with them Artayctes and his son also in bonds. 9.120. It is related by the people of the Chersonese that a marvellous thing happened one of those who guarded Artayctes. He was frying dried fish, and these as they lay over the fire began to leap and writhe as though they had just been caught. ,The rest gathered around, amazed at the sight, but when Artayctes saw this strange thing, he called the one who was frying the fish and said to him: “Athenian, do not be afraid of this portent, for it is not to you that it has been sent; it is to me that Protesilaus of Elaeus is trying to signify that although he is dead and dry, he has power given him by the god to take vengeance on me, the one who wronged him. ,Now therefore I offer a ransom, the sum of one hundred talents to the god for the treasure that I took from his temple. I will also pay to the Athenians two hundred talents for myself and my son, if they spare us.” ,But Xanthippus the general was unmoved by this promise, for the people of Elaeus desired that Artayctes should be put to death in revenge for Protesilaus, and the general himself was so inclined. So they carried Artayctes away to the headland where Xerxes had bridged the strait (or, by another story, to the hill above the town of Madytus), and there nailed him to boards and hanged him. As for his son, they stoned him to death before his father's eyes.
5. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.35.1, 2.43.1-2.43.2, 2.52.4, 2.63.2, 3.37.2, 6.85.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.35.1. ‘Most of my predecessors in this place have commended him who made this speech part of the law, telling us that it is well that it should be delivered at the burial of those who fall in battle. For myself, I should have thought that the worth which had displayed itself in deeds, would be sufficiently rewarded by honors also shown by deeds; such as you now see in this funeral prepared at the people's cost. And I could have wished that the reputations of many brave men were not to be imperilled in the mouth of a single individual, to stand or fall according as he spoke well or ill. For it is hard to speak properly upon a subject where it is even difficult to convince your hearers that you are speaking the truth. 2.43.1. So died these men as became Athenians. You, their survivors, must determine to have as unaltering a resolution in the field, though you may pray that it may have a happier issue. And not contented with ideas derived only from words of the advantages which are bound up with the defence of your country, though these would furnish a valuable text to a speaker even before an audience so alive to them as the present, you must yourselves realize the power of Athens, and feed your eyes upon her from day to day, till love of her fills your hearts; and then when all her greatness shall break upon you, you must reflect that it was by courage, sense of duty, and a keen feeling of honor in action that men were enabled to win all this, and that no personal failure in an enterprise could make them consent to deprive their country of their valor, but they laid it at her feet as the most glorious contribution that they could offer. 2.43.2. For this offering of their lives made in common by them all they each of them individually received that renown which never grows old, and for a sepulchre, not so much that in which their bones have been deposited, but that noblest of shrines wherein their glory is laid up to be eternally remembered upon every occasion on which deed or story shall fall for its commemoration. 2.52.4. All the burial rites before in use were entirely upset, and they buried the bodies as best they could. Many from want of the proper appliances, through so many of their friends having died already, had recourse to the most shameless sepultures: sometimes getting the start of those who had raised a pile, they threw their own dead body upon the stranger's pyre and ignited it; sometimes they tossed the corpse which they were carrying on the top of another that was burning, and so went off. 2.63.2. Besides, to recede is no longer possible, if indeed any of you in the alarm of the moment has become enamored of the honesty of such an unambitious part. For what you hold is, to speak somewhat plainly, a tyranny; to take it perhaps was wrong, but to let it go is unsafe.
7. Xenophon, Memoirs, 4.6.12 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.6.12. Kingship and despotism, in his judgment, were both forms of government, but he held that they differed. For government of men with their consent and in accordance with the laws of the state was kingship; while government of unwilling subjects and not controlled by laws, but imposed by the will of the ruler, was despotism. And where the officials are chosen among those who fulfil the requirements of the laws, the constitution is an aristocracy: where rateable property is the qualification for office, you have a plutocracy: where all are eligible, a democracy.
8. Plutarch, On The Malice of Herodotus, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absence Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
antiphon, anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265, 289
aristophanes, acharnian chorus in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, agoracritus in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
aristophanes, and anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, cleon in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
aristophanes, demos in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
aristophanes, dicaeopolis in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, ending of knights Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
aristophanes, knights Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77, 78; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
aristophanes, on flattering rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
aristophanes, on sovereignty of demos Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
aristophanes, parody of telephus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, works, acharnians Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, works, knights Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
aristophanes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
athenian exceptionalism Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
athens, athenians Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
athens, comic vision of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
athens Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
athens and athenians, and drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
athens and athenians, tyranny and Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
audience Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
autochthony, athenian Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
basileus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
callimachus, athenian polemarch Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
cleon, in knights Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
cleon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
connor, w. robert Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
deception, and comedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
deception, and tragedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
deception, association with rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265, 289
deliberation, successful Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
democracy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
demos, success of Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
demos (knights) Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77, 78
discrepancy, between words and deeds Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
empire, athenian Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
eros Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
eupolis, production of Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
euripides, contemporary resonances Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
euripides, forensic language in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
euripides, on (im)materiality of lies Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
euripides, on rhetoric of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
euripides, plays parodied in aristophanes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
euripides, telephus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
euripides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
flattery, of the demos Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 78
freedom Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
funeral oration Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
gaping, as reaction to speech Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 78
guildford four, the Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
henderson, jeffrey Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
herodotus Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
hippolytus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
ideal, idealism Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
intertextual, intertextuality Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
justice Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
kallet, lisa Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
kingship, among greeks Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
law Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
marathon, battle of Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
marathon Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
materiality, in euripides, of discourse Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
materiality, in euripides Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
mcglew, james f. Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
miltiades Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
nostalgia, athenian Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
panhellenic Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
parker, victor Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
peloponnesian war, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
periclean citizenship law, the Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
pericles Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112; Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
plague Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
plato Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
political geography Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
praxithea Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
prostatēs tou dēmou Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 78
raaflaub, kurt a. Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
reinders, p. Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 78
rhetoric, of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
rule of law Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
sicily and sicilians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
socrates Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
sovereignty, concept of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
sparta, spartan Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
sparta Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
success, of the demos, as result of deliberation Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
symbol Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
themistocles, posthumous reputation of Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 77
theseus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 289
thucydides, on tyrants and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
thucydides Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
tragedy Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
translocation, of debate in aristophanes' Major, The Court of Comedy: Aristophanes, Rhetoric, and Democracy in Fifth-Century Athens(2013) 78
tyranny, greek attitudes towards Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
tyranny Kirichenko, Greek Literature and the Ideal: The Pragmatics of Space from the Archaic to the Hellenistic Age (2022) 110
tyrant Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
xenophon Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112
xenophon of athens, on tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 19
xerxes Athanassaki and Titchener, Plutarch's Cities (2022) 112