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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1202
Aristophanes, Knights, 1095-1150
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οὐκ ἦν ἄρ' οὐδεὶς τοῦ Γλάνιδος σοφώτερος.DEMOS: Truly Glanis is the wisest of men. I shall yield myself to you; guide me in my old age and educate me anew. CLEON: Ah! I adjure you! not yet; wait a little; I will promise to distribute barley every day. DEMOS: Ah! I will not hear another word about barley; you have cheated me too often already, both you and Theophanes. CLEON: Well then! you shall have flour-cakes all piping hot. SAUSAGE-SELLER: I will give you cakes too, and nice cooked fish; you will only have to eat. DEMOS: Very well, mind you keep your promises. To whichever of you twain shall treat me best I hand over the reins of state. CLEON: I will be first. SAUSAGE-SELLER: No, no, I will. CHORUS: Demos, you are our all-powerful sovereign lord; all tremble before you, yet you are led by the nose. You love to be flattered and fooled; you listen to the orators with gaping mouth and your mind is led astray. DEMOS: 'Tis rather you who have no brains, if you think me so foolish as all that; it is with a purpose that I play this idiot's role, for I love to drink the lifelong day, and so it pleases me to keep a thief for my minister. When he has thoroughly gorged himself, then I overthrow and crush him.
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χοὔτω μὲν ἂν εὖ ποιοῖςCHORUS: What profound wisdom! If it be really so, why! all is for the best. Your ministers, then, are your victims, whom you nourish and feed up expressly in the Pnyx, so that, the day your dinner is ready, you may immolate the fattest and eat him. DEMOS: Look, see how I play with them, while all the time they think themselves such adepts at cheating me. I have my eye on them when they thieve, but I do not appear to be seeing them; then I thrust a judgment down their throat as it were a feather, and force them to vomit up all they have robbed from me. CLEON: Oh! the rascal! SAUSAGE-SELLER: Oh! the scoundrel! CLEON: Demos, all is ready these three hours; I await your orders and I burn with desire to load you with benefits. SAUSAGE-SELLER: And I ten, twelve, a thousand hours, a long, long while, an infinitely long while. DEMOS: As for me, 'tis thirty thousand hours that I have been impatient; very long, infinitely long that I have cursed you. SAUSAGE-SELLER: Do you know what you had best do? DEMOS: If I do not, tell me. SAUSAGE-SELLER: Declare the lists open and we will contend abreast to determine who shall treat you the best.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 24.527-24.528 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.527. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot 24.528. /For on this wise have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals, that they should live in pain; and themselves are sorrowless. For two urns are set upon the floor of Zeus of gifts that he giveth, the one of ills, the other of blessings. To whomsoever Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, giveth a mingled lot
2. Homer, Odyssey, 8.335 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1255, 1254 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1254. καὶ μὴν ἄγαν γʼ Ἕλληνʼ ἐπίσταμαι φάτιν. Χορός 1254. For Puthian oracles, thy speech, and hard too. KASSANDRA
4. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 371-378, 440-444, 634-635, 370 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

370. καίτοι δέδοικα πολλά: τούς τε γὰρ τρόπους
5. Aristophanes, Birds, 959-990, 958 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

958. αὖθις σὺ περιχώρει λαβὼν τὴν χέρνιβα.
6. Aristophanes, Knights, 1001-1089, 109, 1090-1094, 1096-1099, 110, 1100-1109, 111, 1110-1119, 112, 1120-1129, 113, 1130-1139, 114, 1140-1149, 115, 1150, 116, 1166-1169, 117, 1170-1179, 118, 1180-1181, 1186-1187, 119-120, 1209, 121, 1210, 122, 1225-1229, 123, 1230-1234, 124-134, 1340-1344, 135-148, 177, 193-222, 766-768, 781, 788, 792-794, 797-800, 802-819, 832-840, 844-859, 862, 877-880, 891, 927-940, 944, 956-958, 960-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. καὶ νὴ Δί' ἔτι γέ μοὔστι κιβωτὸς πλέα.
7. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 763-780, 762 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

762. ὦ δαιμόνιαι παύσασθε τῶν τερατευμάτων.
8. Aristophanes, Peace, 1024-1126, 1023 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1023. σέ τοι θύρασι χρὴ μένοντα τοίνυν
9. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1332-1344, 186, 290-296, 320, 340, 345-348, 395, 486, 1331 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1331. ὦ νυκτὸς κελαινοφαὴς
10. Aristophanes, Wasps, 11-54, 8-10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. τὸν αὐτὸν ἄρ' ἐμοὶ βουκολεῖς Σαβάζιον.
11. Herodotus, Histories, 6.19.2-6.19.3, 7.6.3, 7.141-7.143 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6.19.2. I will mention the part concerning the Argives when I come to that part of my history; this was the prophecy given to the Milesians in their absence: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Then, Miletus, contriver of evil deeds, /l lFor many will you become a banquet and glorious gifts; /l lYour wives will wash the feet of many long-haired men; /l lOther ministers will tend my Didyman shrine! /l /quote 6.19.3. All this now came upon the Milesians, since most of their men were slain by the Persians, who wore long hair, and their women and children were accounted as slaves, and the temple at Didyma with its shrine and place of divination was plundered and burnt. of the wealth that was in this temple I have often spoken elsewhere in my history. 7.6.3. They had come up to Sardis with Onomacritus, an Athenian diviner who had set in order the oracles of Musaeus. They had reconciled their previous hostility with him; Onomacritus had been banished from Athens by Pisistratus' son Hipparchus, when he was caught by Lasus of Hermione in the act of interpolating into the writings of Musaeus an oracle showing that the islands off Lemnos would disappear into the sea. 7.141. When the Athenian messengers heard that, they were very greatly dismayed, and gave themselves up for lost by reason of the evil foretold. Then Timon son of Androbulus, as notable a man as any Delphian, advised them to take boughs of supplication and in the guise of suppliants, approach the oracle a second time. ,The Athenians did exactly this; “Lord,” they said, “regard mercifully these suppliant boughs which we bring to you, and give us some better answer concerning our country. Otherwise we will not depart from your temple, but remain here until we die.” Thereupon the priestess gave them this second oracle: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Vainly does Pallas strive to appease great Zeus of Olympus; /l lWords of entreaty are vain, and so too cunning counsels of wisdom. /l lNevertheless I will speak to you again of strength adamantine. /l lAll will be taken and lost that the sacred border of Cecrops /l lHolds in keeping today, and the dales divine of Cithaeron; /l lYet a wood-built wall will by Zeus all-seeing be granted /l lTo the Trito-born, a stronghold for you and your children. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Await not the host of horse and foot coming from Asia, /l lNor be still, but turn your back and withdraw from the foe. /l lTruly a day will come when you will meet him face to face. /l lDivine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote 7.142. This answer seemed to be and really was more merciful than the first, and the envoys, writing it down, departed for Athens. When the messengers had left Delphi and laid the oracle before the people, there was much inquiry concerning its meaning, and among the many opinions which were uttered, two contrary ones were especially worthy of note. Some of the elder men said that the gods answer signified that the acropolis should be saved, for in old time the acropolis of Athens had been fenced by a thorn hedge, ,which, by their interpretation, was the wooden wall. But others supposed that the god was referring to their ships, and they were for doing nothing but equipping these. Those who believed their ships to be the wooden wall were disabled by the two last verses of the oracle: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Divine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote ,These verses confounded the opinion of those who said that their ships were the wooden wall, for the readers of oracles took the verses to mean that they should offer battle by sea near Salamis and be there overthrown. 7.143. Now there was a certain Athenian, by name and title Themistocles son of Neocles, who had lately risen to be among their chief men. He claimed that the readers of oracles had incorrectly interpreted the whole of the oracle and reasoned that if the verse really pertained to the Athenians, it would have been formulated in less mild language, calling Salamis “cruel” rather than “divine ” seeing that its inhabitants were to perish. ,Correctly understood, the gods' oracle was spoken not of the Athenians but of their enemies, and his advice was that they should believe their ships to be the wooden wall and so make ready to fight by sea. ,When Themistocles put forward this interpretation, the Athenians judged him to be a better counsellor than the readers of oracles, who would have had them prepare for no sea fight, and, in short, offer no resistance at all, but leave Attica and settle in some other country.
12. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

463a. whether this is the rhetoric which Gorgias practices, for from our argument just now we got no very clear view as to how he conceives it; but what I call rhetoric is a part of a certain business which has nothing fine about it. Gorg. What is that, Socrates? Tell us, without scruple on my account. Soc. It seems to me then, Gorgias, to be a pursuit that is not a matter of art, but showing a shrewd, gallant spirit which has a natural bent for clever dealing with mankind, and I sum up its substance in the name flattery.
13. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.65.8-2.65.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.65.8. The causes of this are not far to seek. Pericles indeed, by his rank, ability, and known integrity, was enabled to exercise an independent control over the multitude—in short, to lead them instead of being led by them; for as he never sought power by improper means, he was never compelled to flatter them, but, on the contrary, enjoyed so high an estimation that he could afford to anger them by contradiction. 2.65.9. Whenever he saw them unseasonably and insolently elated, he would with a word reduce them to alarm; on the other hand, if they fell victims to a panic, he could at once restore them to confidence. In short, what was nominally a democracy became in his hands government by the first citizen. 2.65.10. With his successors it was different. More on a level with one another, and each grasping at supremacy, they ended by committing even the conduct of state affairs to the whims of the multitude.
14. Menander, Dyscolus, 407, 411-418, 406 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

15. Plutarch, Against Colotes, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Plutarch, On Talkativeness, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 4.27.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.27.4. Epaminondas was most strongly drawn to the foundation by the oracles of Bacis, who was inspired by the Nymphs and left prophecies regarding others of the Greeks as well as the return of the Messenians: Then indeed shall the bright bloom of Sparta perish and Messene again shall be inhabited for all time. I have discovered that Bacis also told in what manner Eira would be captured, and this too is one of his oracles: The men of Messene o'ercome by the thunder's roll and spouting rain.
19. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 13.6-13.9, 26.8



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antiphon, anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218, 265
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
archaic greek (sibyl) Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
aristophanes, acharnian chorus in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, and anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, dicaeopolis in Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, parody of telephus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes, works, acharnians Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
aristophanes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83; Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124; Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218, 265
aristotle, and rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
athena, polias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
athens, comic vision of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
audience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
authority, of the experts Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
bakis Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
cicero Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
cosmos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
cultural hybridity Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
deception, and comedy Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
deception, and sophistry Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
deception, association with rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218, 265
delphi Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
democracy, athenian, and noble lies, and its oratory Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
demosthenes, representation of deceit Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
demosthenes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
dialectic Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
dionysalexander Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
dionysus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
dramaturgy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
dream, passim, esp., epiphany dream Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, prologue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
euripides, plays parodied in aristophanes Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
euripides, telephus Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 265
experts, expertise, derveni author as expert Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
fire, in cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
gender, male Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
gods (egyptian, greek, and roman), apollon Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
hippocratic authors Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
homer Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
impasse, dramatic Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
inspiration Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
medicine Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
new comedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
ober, j. Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
obscure speech Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
old comedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
olympian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
omens Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
onomacritus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
oracles Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
pan Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
paphlagon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
parody Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
pax romana Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
peisetaerus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
peloponnesian war Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
pericles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
personification of abstract notions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
plato, and rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
plato Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
plot, emplotment Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
plot Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132, 133
portents' Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
prophecy Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 59
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
rage / lyssa (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
reality Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
rhetoric, in aristotle Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
rhetoric, in plato Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
rhetoric, of anti-rhetoric Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218, 265
rhetoric, theory of Hesk, Deception and Democracy in Classical Athens (2000) 218
riddles Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
ritual Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
satire Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
simonides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
socrates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
sophists Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
spectacle, theater asa Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 133
sun Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
theodicy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 132
theon Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 124
truth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
uranus castration, as first-born (πρωτόγονος) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
uranus phallus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
venerable (epithet of uranus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
wisdom (expertise), wisdom contests Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
wisdom (expertise) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
zeus incest with his mother Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83
νοῦς (allegory of zeus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 83