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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1209
Aristophanes, Frogs, 440-446
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 10.509, 11.485, 11.491 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 481-482, 480 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

480. Also there were gathering blooms with me
3. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, Peace, 130-134, 143, 147, 154-161, 169-172, 66, 97, 129 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

129. ἐν τοῖσιν Αἰσώπου λόγοις ἐξηυρέθη
5. Aristophanes, Frogs, 209-219, 22, 220, 234, 297, 312-439, 441-459, 463-478, 740, 1150 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1150. Διόνυσε πίνεις οἶνον οὐκ ἀνθοσμίαν.
6. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 947-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
7. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1363-1365, 1362 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1362. λαβοῦς', ἵν' αὐτὸν τωθάσω νεανικῶς
8. Herodotus, Histories, 5.82-5.88 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.82. This was the beginning of the Aeginetans' long-standing debt of enmity against the Athenians. The Epidaurians' land bore no produce. For this reason they inquired at Delphi concerning this calamity, and the priestess bade them set up images of Damia and Auxesia, saying that if they so did their luck would be better. The Epidaurians then asked in addition whether they should make the images of bronze or of stone, and the priestess bade them do neither, but make them of the wood of the cultivated olive. ,So the men of Epidaurus asked the Athenians to permit them to cut down some olive trees, supposing the olives there to be the holiest. Indeed it is said that at that time there were no olives anywhere save at Athens. ,The Athenians consented to give the trees, if the Epidaurians would pay yearly sacred dues to Athena, the city's goddess, and to Erechtheus. The Epidaurians agreed to this condition, and their request was granted. When they set up images made of these olive trees, their land brought forth fruit, and they fulfilled their agreement with the Athenians. 5.83. Now at this time, as before it, the Aeginetans were in all matters still subject to the Epidaurians and even crossed to Epidaurus for the hearing of their own private lawsuits. From this time, however, they began to build ships, and stubbornly revolted from the Epidaurians. ,In the course of this struggle, they did the Epidaurians much damage and stole their images of Damia and Auxesia. These they took away and set them up in the middle of their own country at a place called Oea, about twenty furlongs distant from their city. ,Having set them up in this place they sought their favor with sacrifices and female choruses in the satirical and abusive mode. Ten men were appointed providers of a chorus for each of the deities, and the choruses aimed their raillery not at any men but at the women of the country. The Epidaurians too had the same rites, and they have certain secret rites as well. 5.84. When these images were stolen, the Epidaurians ceased from fulfilling their agreement with the Athenians. Then the Athenians sent an angry message to the Epidaurians who pleaded in turn that they were doing no wrong. “For as long,” they said, “as we had the images in our country, we fulfilled our agreement. Now that we are deprived of them, it is not just that we should still be paying. Ask your dues of the men of Aegina, who have the images.” ,The Athenians therefore sent to Aegina and demanded that the images be restored, but the Aeginetans answered that they had nothing to do with the Athenians. 5.85. The Athenians report that after making this demand, they despatched one trireme with certain of their citizens who, coming in the name of the whole people to Aegina, attempted to tear the images, as being made of Attic wood, from their bases so that they might carry them away. ,When they could not obtain possession of them in this manner, they tied cords around the images with which they could be dragged. While they were attempting to drag them off, they were overtaken both by a thunderstorm and an earthquake. This drove the trireme's crew to such utter madness that they began to slay each other as if they were enemies. At last only one of all was left, who returned by himself to Phalerum. 5.86. This is the Athenian version of the matter, but the Aeginetans say that the Athenians came not in one ship only, for they could easily have kept off a single ship, or several, for that matter, even if they had no navy themselves. The truth was, they said, that the Athenians descended upon their coasts with many ships and that they yielded to them without making a fight of it at sea. ,They are not able to determine clearly whether it was because they admitted to being weaker at sea-fighting that they yielded, or because they were planning what they then actually did. ,When, as the Aeginetans say, no man came out to fight with them, the Athenians disembarked from their ships and turned their attention to the images. Unable to drag them from the bases, they fastened cords on them and dragged them until they both—this I cannot believe, but another might—fell on their knees. Both have remained in this position ever since. ,This is what the Athenians did, but the Aeginetans say that they discovered that the Athenians were about to make war upon them and therefore assured themselves of help from the Argives. So when the Athenians disembarked on the land of Aegina, the Argives came to aid the Aeginetans, crossing over from Epidaurus to the island secretly. They then fell upon the Athenians unaware and cut them off from their ships. It was at this moment that the thunderstorm and earthquake came upon them 5.87. This, then, is the story told by the Argives and Aeginetans, and the Athenians too acknowledge that only one man of their number returned safely to Attica. ,The Argives, however, say that he escaped after they had destroyed the rest of the Athenian force, while the Athenians claim that the whole thing was to be attributed to divine power. This one man did not survive but perished in the following manner. It would seem that he made his way to Athens and told of the mishap. When the wives of the men who had gone to attack Aegina heard this, they were very angry that he alone should be safe. They gathered round him and stabbed him with the brooch-pins of their garments, each asking him where her husband was. ,This is how this man met his end, and the Athenians found the action of their women to be more dreadful than their own misfortune. They could find, it is said, no other way to punish the women than changing their dress to the Ionian fashion. Until then the Athenian women had worn Dorian dress, which is very like the Corinthian. It was changed, therefore, to the linen tunic, so that they might have no brooch-pins to use. 5.88. The truth of the matter, however, is that this form of dress is not in its origin Ionian, but Carian, for in ancient times all women in Greece wore the costume now known as Dorian. ,As for the Argives and Aeginetans, this was the reason of their passing a law in both their countries that brooch-pins should be made half as long as they used to be and that brooches should be the principal things offered by women in the shrines of these two goddesses. Furthermore, nothing else Attic should be brought to the temple, not even pottery, and from that time on only drinking vessels made in the country should be used.
9. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

41a. after leaving behind these who claim to be judges, shall find those who are really judges who are said to sit in judgment there, Minos and Rhadamanthus, and Aeacus and Triptolemus, and all the other demigods who were just men in their lives, would the change of habitation be undesirable? Or again, what would any of you give to meet with Orpheus and Musaeus and Hesiod and Homer? I am willing to die many times over, if these things are true; for I personally should find the life there wonderful
10. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

523e. to stop this in them. Next they must be stripped bare of all those things before they are tried; for they must stand their trial dead. Their judge also must be naked, dead, beholding with very soul the very soul of each immediately upon his death, bereft of all his kin and having left behind on earth all that fine array, to the end that the judgement may be just. Soc. Now I, knowing all this before you, have appointed sons of my own to be judges; two from Asia, Minos and Rhadamanthus
11. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

12. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 34.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

34.4. Accordingly, it seemed to Alcibiades that it would be a fine thing, enhancing his holiness in the eyes of the gods and his good repute in the minds of men, to restore its traditional fashion to the sacred festival by escorting the rite with his infantry along past the enemy by land. He would thus either thwart and humble Agis, if the king kept entirely quiet, or would fight a fight that was sacred and approved by the gods, in behalf of the greatest and holiest interests, in full sight of his native city, and with all his fellow citizens eye-witnesses of his valor.
15. Plutarch, Demetrius, 1.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.29.6-2.29.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.29.6. of the Greek islands, Aegina is the most difficult of access, for it is surrounded by sunken rocks and reefs which rise up. The story is that Aeacus devised this feature of set purpose, because he feared piratical raids by sea, and wished the approach to be perilous to enemies. Near the harbor in which vessels mostly anchor is a temple of Aphrodite, and in the most conspicuous part of the city what is called the shrine of Aeacus, a quadrangular enclosure of white marble. 2.29.7. Wrought in relief at the entrance are the envoys whom the Greeks once dispatched to Aeacus. The reason for the embassy given by the Aeginetans is the same as that which the other Greeks assign. A drought had for some time afflicted Greece, and no rain fell either beyond the Isthmus or in the Peloponnesus, until at last they sent envoys to Delphi to ask what was the cause and to beg for deliverance from the evil. The Pythian priestess bade them propitiate Zeus, saying that he would not listen to them unless the one to supplicate him were Aeacus.
17. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None

18. Hildegarde of Bingen, Sciv., 9.15



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
aeschylus, local, in panhellenic ritual setting Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
afterlife de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
afterlife lots, bliss and festivities Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 140, 141
afterlife lots, filth and muck Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 140, 141
aiakos, hero of grain-supply Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aiakos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans, and athens Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans, commercial, maritime elite Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans, economic myths of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans, economic role of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans, medism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans, panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans, rivalry with athens Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
aigina, aiginetans Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
anapaests Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
anthesteria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
antigone Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
arginousai Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 141
athenian empire, and grain-supply Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
athenian empire, as system of economic dependencies Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
athens, and panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
athens Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
ballet Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
blessed de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
boundaries, renegotiation of social boundaries Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 141
carnival, carnivalesque Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
chorus, ancient, greek, comic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
chorus / choral lyric de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
comedy, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
cult songs Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dance, round / circular Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
death Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
defending greeks and democracies, and economy Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
defending greeks and democracies, and thalassocracy Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
demeter Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
didaskalia Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dionysalexandros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
dionysos, dionysos limnaios/en lymnais Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
dionysus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
drought, in myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
economy, early fifth-century, and definitions of panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
economy, early fifth-century, and grain supply Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
economy, early fifth-century, and myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
economy, early fifth-century, athenocentric vs. internationalist Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
economy, early fifth-century, of saronic gulf Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
eleusis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
elites, caught between aristocracy and democracy Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
elites, in athenian empire Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
elites, maritime and commercial Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
eueteria Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
festivals de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
funerary, local myth in panhellenic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
grain-supply, and panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
grain-supply Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
hades, god de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
hades Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
heroes de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
holy man de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
house of Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 162
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
iacchus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
identity, general, commercial Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
insular, panhellenic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
isles of the blessed de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
italy Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
journey de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
kingship de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
kronos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
lenaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
literature, greek, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
locality, and panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
lévi-strauss, c., λήμη (pus in the eye, preventing vision), for aigina Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
mysteries, greater (of eleusis) Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 349
mystic Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
myth, economic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
odysseus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
omens Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
oracles Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
panhellenic ritual, featuring local myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism, competed over Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism, contested visions of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism, delphi and Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism, economic dimension of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism, expressed in song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism, local claims to Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism, tool in social contexts Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
past, mythical, relations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
performances of myth and ritual (also song), and economic patterns Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
persian wars, and panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
piraeus Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
portents Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
procession (pompe) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
rain, in myth, economic metaphor Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
rites, ritual de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
roads, sacred to eleusis Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 349
salvation Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
saronic gulf, economic region Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
search scenes Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
social change, and myth Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
soul, of dead de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
tablets, orphic gold de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
theater, theatrical, metatheatre, metatheatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
triptolemos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
underworld Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
wine' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
xerxes, watching grain ships Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
zeus hellanios, and claims to panhellenism Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213
zeus hellanios Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 213