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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1209
Aristophanes, Frogs, 324
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

29 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 11.485, 11.491 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Homeric Hymns, To Demeter, 481, 480 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

480. Also there were gathering blooms with me
3. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Pindar, Fragments, 137 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 248-253, 247 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

247. καὶ μὴν καλόν γ' ἔστ': ὦ Διόνυσε δέσποτα
6. Aristophanes, Peace, 130-134, 143, 147, 154-161, 169-172, 66, 97, 129 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

129. ἐν τοῖσιν Αἰσώπου λόγοις ἐξηυρέθη
7. Aristophanes, Frogs, 209-219, 22, 220, 234, 297, 312-323, 325-459, 740, 1150 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1150. Διόνυσε πίνεις οἶνον οὐκ ἀνθοσμίαν.
8. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 947-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
9. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1363-1365, 1362 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1362. λαβοῦς', ἵν' αὐτὸν τωθάσω νεανικῶς
10. Euripides, Bacchae, 725, 526 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

526. Ἴθι, Διθύραμβʼ, ἐμὰν ἄρσενα word split in text foreign xml:lang=
11. Herodotus, Histories, 8.65 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8.65. Dicaeus son of Theocydes, an Athenian exile who had become important among the Medes, said that at the time when the land of Attica was being laid waste by Xerxes' army and there were no Athenians in the country, he was with Demaratus the Lacedaemonian on the Thriasian plain and saw advancing from Eleusis a cloud of dust as if raised by the feet of about thirty thousand men. They marvelled at what men might be raising such a cloud of dust and immediately heard a cry. The cry seemed to be the “Iacchus” of the mysteries, ,and when Demaratus, ignorant of the rites of Eleusis, asked him what was making this sound, Dicaeus said, “Demaratus, there is no way that some great disaster will not befall the king's army. Since Attica is deserted, it is obvious that this voice is divine and comes from Eleusis to help the Athenians and their allies. ,If it descends upon the Peloponnese, the king himself and his army on the mainland will be endangered. If, however, it turns towards the ships at Salamis, the king will be in danger of losing his fleet. ,Every year the Athenians observe this festival for the Mother and the Maiden, and any Athenian or other Hellene who wishes is initiated. The voice which you hear is the ‘Iacchus’ they cry at this festival.” To this Demaratus replied, “Keep silent and tell this to no one else. ,If these words of yours are reported to the king, you will lose your head, and neither I nor any other man will be able to save you, so be silent. The gods will see to the army.” ,Thus he advised, and after the dust and the cry came a cloud, which rose aloft and floated away towards Salamis to the camp of the Hellenes. In this way they understood that Xerxes' fleet was going to be destroyed. Dicaeus son of Theocydes used to say this, appealing to Demaratus and others as witnesses.
12. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Philochorus, Fragments, None (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

14. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.96, 5.75.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.96. 1.  But now that we have examined these matters, we must enumerate what Greeks, who have won fame for their wisdom and learning, visited Egypt in ancient times, in order to become acquainted with its customs and learning.,2.  For the priests of Egypt recount from the records of their sacred books that they were visited in early times by Orpheus, Musaeus, Melampus, and Daedalus, also by the poet Homer and Lycurgus of Sparta, later by Solon of Athens and the philosopher Plato, and that there also came Pythagoras of Samos and the mathematician Eudoxus, as well as Democritus of Abdera and Oenopides of Chios.,3.  As evidence for the visits of all these men they point in some cases to their statues and in others to places or buildings which bear their names, and they offer proofs from the branch of learning which each one of these men pursued, arguing that all the things for which they were admired among the Greeks were transferred from Egypt.,4.  Orpheus, for instance, brought from Egypt most of his mystic ceremonies, the orgiastic rites that accompanied his wanderings, and his fabulous account of his experiences in Hades.,5.  For the rite of Osiris is the same as that of Dionysus and that of Isis very similar to that of Demeter, the names alone having been interchanged; and the punishments in Hades of the unrighteous, the Fields of the Righteous, and the fantastic conceptions, current among the many, which are figments of the imagination — all these were introduced by Orpheus in imitation of the Egyptian funeral customs.,6.  Hermes, for instance, the Conductor of Souls, according to the ancient Egyptian custom, brings up the body of the Apis to a certain point and then gives it over to one who wears the mask of Cerberus. And after Orpheus had introduced this notion among the Greeks, Homer followed it when he wrote: Cyllenian Hermes then did summon forth The suitors's souls, holding his wand in hand. And again a little further on he says: They passed Oceanus' streams, the Gleaming Rock, The Portals of the Sun, the Land of Dreams; And now they reached the Meadow of Asphodel, Where dwell the Souls, the shades of men outworn.,7.  Now he calls the river "Oceanus" because in their language the Egyptians speak of the Nile as Oceanus; the "Portals of the Sun" (Heliopulai) is his name for the city of Heliopolis; and "Meadows," the mythical dwelling of the dead, is his term for the place near the lake which is called Acherousia, which is near Memphis, and around it are fairest meadows, of a marsh-land and lotus and reeds. The same explanation also serves for the statement that the dwelling of the dead is in these regions, since the most and the largest tombs of the Egyptians are situated there, the dead being ferried across both the river and Lake Acherousia and their bodies laid in the vaults situated there.,8.  The other myths about Hades, current among the Greeks, also agree with the customs which are practised even now in Egypt. For the boat which receives the bodies is called baris, and the passenger's fee is given to the boatman, who in the Egyptian tongue is called charon.,9.  And near these regions, they say, are also the "Shades," which is a temple of Hecate, and "portals" of Cocytus and Lethe, which are covered at intervals with bands of bronze. There are, moreover, other portals, namely, those of Truth, and near them stands a headless statue of Justice. 5.75.4.  As for Dionysus, the myths state that he discovered the vine and its cultivation, and also how to make wine and to store away many of the autumn fruits and thus to provide mankind with the use of them as food over a long time. This god was born in Crete, men say, of Zeus and Persephonê, and Orpheus has handed down the tradition in the initiatory rites that he was torn in pieces by the Titans. And the fact is that there have been several who bore the name Dionysus, regarding whom we have given a detailed account at greater length in connection with the more appropriate period of time.
15. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.10. And on this account Plato, and even before his time the Pythagoreians, called philosophy music; and they say that the universe is constituted in accordance with harmony, assuming that every form of music is the work of the gods. And in this sense, also, the Muses are goddesses, and Apollo is leader of the Muses, and poetry as a whole is laudatory of the gods. And by the same course of reasoning they also attribute to music the upbuilding of morals, believing that everything which tends to correct the mind is close to the gods. Now most of the Greeks assigned to Dionysus, Apollo, Hecate, the Muses, and above all to Demeter, everything of an orgiastic or Bacchic or choral nature, as well as the mystic element in initiations; and they give the name Iacchus not only to Dionysus but also to the leader-in-chief of the mysteries, who is the genius of Demeter. And branch-bearing, choral dancing, and initiations are common elements in the worship of these gods. As for the Muses and Apollo, the Muses preside over the choruses, whereas Apollo presides both over these and the rites of divination. But all educated men, and especially the musicians, are ministers of the Muses; and both these and those who have to do with divination are ministers of Apollo; and the initiated and torch-bearers and hierophants, of Demeter; and the Sileni and Satyri and Bacchae, and also the Lenae and Thyiae and Mimallones and Naides and Nymphae and the beings called Tityri, of Dionysus.
16. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 34.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

34.4. Accordingly, it seemed to Alcibiades that it would be a fine thing, enhancing his holiness in the eyes of the gods and his good repute in the minds of men, to restore its traditional fashion to the sacred festival by escorting the rite with his infantry along past the enemy by land. He would thus either thwart and humble Agis, if the king kept entirely quiet, or would fight a fight that was sacred and approved by the gods, in behalf of the greatest and holiest interests, in full sight of his native city, and with all his fellow citizens eye-witnesses of his valor.
17. Plutarch, Consolation To His Wife, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

611d. when they reach the point where the want is no longer felt; and your Timoxena has been deprived of little, for what she knew was little, and her pleasure was in little things; and as for those things of which she had acquired no perception, which she had never conceived, and to which she had never given thought, how could she be said to be deprived of them? Furthermore, Iknow that you are kept from believing the statements of that other set, who win many to their way of thinking when they say that nothing is in any way evil or painful to "what has undergone dissolution," by the teaching of our fathers and by the mystic formulas of Dionysiac rites, the knowledge of which we who are participants share with each other. Consider then that the soul, which is imperishable
18. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.17.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. Lucian, The Dance, 39, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8.37.5, 10.4.3, 10.32.2, 10.32.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8.37.5. By the image of the Mistress stands Anytus, represented as a man in armour. Those about the sanctuary say that the Mistress was brought up by Anytus, who was one of the Titans, as they are called. The first to introduce Titans into poetry was Homer, See Hom. Il. 14.279 . representing them as gods down in what is called Tartarus; the lines are in the passage about Hera's oath. From Homer the name of the Titans was taken by Onomacritus, who in the orgies he composed for Dionysus made the Titans the authors of the god's sufferings. 10.4.3. The former passage, in which Homer speaks of the beautiful dancing-floors of Panopeus, I could not understand until I was taught by the women whom the Athenians call Thyiads. The Thyiads are Attic women, who with the Delphian women go to Parnassus every other year and celebrate orgies in honor of Dionysus. It is the custom for these Thyiads to hold dances at places, including Panopeus, along the road from Athens . The epithet Homer applies to Panopeus is thought to refer to the dance of the Thyiads. 10.32.2. On the way from Delphi to the summit of Parnassus, about sixty stades distant from Delphi, there is a bronze image. The ascent to the Corycian cave is easier for an active walker than it is for mules or horses. I mentioned a little earlier in my narrative See Paus. 10.6.3 . that this cave was named after a nymph called Corycia, and of all the caves I have ever seen this seemed to me the best worth seeing. 10.32.7. But the Corycian cave exceeds in size those I have mentioned, and it is possible to make one's way through the greater part of it even without lights. The roof stands at a sufficient height from the floor, and water, rising in part from springs but still more dripping from the roof, has made clearly visible the marks of drops on the floor throughout the cave. The dwellers around Parnassus believe it to be sacred to the Corycian nymphs, and especially to Pan. From the Corycian cave it is difficult even for an active walker to reach the heights of Parnassus . The heights are above the clouds, and the Thyiad women rave there in honor of Dionysus and Apollo.
23. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.19 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

24. Origen, Against Celsus, 4.17 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

4.17. But will not those narratives, especially when they are understood in their proper sense, appear far more worthy of respect than the story that Dionysus was deceived by the Titans, and expelled from the throne of Jupiter, and torn in pieces by them, and his remains being afterwards put together again, he returned as it were once more to life, and ascended to heaven? Or are the Greeks at liberty to refer such stories to the doctrine of the soul, and to interpret them figuratively, while the door of a consistent explanation, and one everywhere in accord and harmony with the writings of the Divine Spirit, who had His abode in pure souls, is closed against us? Celsus, then, is altogether ignorant of the purpose of our writings, and it is therefore upon his own acceptation of them that he casts discredit, and not upon their real meaning; whereas, if he had reflected on what is appropriate to a soul which is to enjoy an everlasting life, and on the opinion which we are to form of its essence and principles, he would not so have ridiculed the entrance of the immortal into a mortal body, which took place not according to the metempsychosis of Plato, but agreeably to another and higher view of things. And he would have observed one descent, distinguished by its great benevolence, undertaken to convert (as the Scripture mystically terms them) the lost sheep of the house of Israel, which had strayed down from the mountains, and to which the Shepherd is said in certain parables to have gone down, leaving on the mountains those which had not strayed.
25. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

26. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.18.6 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

27. Servius, In Vergilii Georgicon Libros, 1.166 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

28. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None

29. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 311



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
afterlife de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
anapaests Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
anthesteria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
antigone Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
archegetes ἀρχηγέτης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
asia minor Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 372
athens Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 350
awakening, dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
bacchus, bacchius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
ballet Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
birth Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
blessed de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
carnival, carnivalesque Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
cave, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
cave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
chorus, ancient, greek, comic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
chorus / choral lyric de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
comedy, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
community with the gods, postmortemnan Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
corycia, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
cry, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 372
cult songs Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
cymbals ῥόπτρον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dance, round / circular Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dance Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
death Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
demeter, dead, association with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
demeter, eleusinian mysteries and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
demeter, hermes and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
demeter, persephone/kore and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
demeter, sanctuaries and temples Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
demeter, zeus and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
demeter Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
didaskalia Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dionysalexandros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos, dionysos bromios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
dionysos, dionysos dithyrambos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
dionysos, dionysos liknites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos, dionysos limnaios/en lymnais Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
dionysos, rebirth Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos, tomb Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 350, 372; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
dionysus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
eleusian mysteries Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
eleusinian mysteries Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 372
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 372
eleusis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
family, parent-child, and death Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 372
festivals de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
funerary epigraphy Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
hades, god de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
hades Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119; Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
hecate Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
helios Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
hermes, demeter/persephone and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
hermes, images and iconography Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
heroes de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
herois, heroides Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
holy man de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
iacche ἴακχε Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 350, 372
iacchus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
immortality, of gods, eternal life Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
isles of the blessed de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
italy Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
journey de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
kingship de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
kronos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
lactantius Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
lenaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 372
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
liknon λίκνον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
literature, greek, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
lucian of samosata Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 372
moira Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
mystai Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
mysteries, greater (of eleusis) Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 349
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
mysteries Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
mystery cults Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
mystes μύστης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
mystic, mystical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
mystic Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 372
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
odysseus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
omens Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
oracles Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
orgiasmos ὀργιασμός Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
orphism, orphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
peisistratus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
persephone/kore, demeter and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
persephone/kore, hermes and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
persephone painter, bell-krater with hermes and persephone returning from hades Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
portents Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
post-mortality belief, bliss Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
post-mortality belief, representation of, greek context Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
procession (pompe) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
purity Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111, 350, 372
rites, ritual de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
roads, sacred to eleusis Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 349
sacrifice, sacrificial Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
salvation Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
sanctuaries and temples, of demeter Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
sanctuary Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
satyrs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
search scenes Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
soul, of dead de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
sparagmós σπαραγμός Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
tablets, orphic gold de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
the dead, demeter associated with Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106
theater, theatrical, metatheatre, metatheatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
thyiads, thyiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
trieteric festivals Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
tympanon τύμπανον Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
underworld Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 187
virginity Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350, 372
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 111
worship' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 350
zeus, demeter and Simon, Zeyl, and Shapiro,, The Gods of the Greeks (2021) 106