Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1209
Aristophanes, Frogs, 316-459
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN


†ἔγειρε φλογέας λαμπάδας ἐν χερσὶ γὰρ ἥκει τινάσσων†CHORUS: Brandish the flaming torches and so revive their brilliancy. Iacchus, oh! Iacchus! bright luminary of our nocturnal Mysteries. The meadow sparkles with a thousand fires; the aged shake off the weight of cares and years; they have once more found limbs of steel, wherewith to take part in thy sacred measures; and do thou, blessed deity, lead the dances of youth upon this dewy carpet of flowers with a torch in thine hand. Silence, make way for our choirs, you profane and impure souls, who have neither been present at the festivals of the noble Muses, nor ever footed a dance in their honour, and who are not initiated into the mysterious language of the dithyrambs of the voracious Cratinus; away from here he who applauds misplaced buffoonery. Away from here the bad citizen, who for his private ends fans and nurses the flame of sedition, the chief who sells himself, when his country is weathering the storms, and surrenders either fortresses or ships; who, like Thorycion, the wretched collector of tolls, sends prohibited goods from Aigina to Epidaurus, such as oar-leathers, sailcloth and pitch, and who secures a subsidy for a hostile fleet, or soils the statues of Hecate, while he is humming some dithyramb. Away from here, the orator who nibbles at the salary of the poets, because he has been scouted in the ancient solemnities of Dionysus; to all such I say, and I repeat, and I say it again for the third time, "Make way for the choruses of the Initiate." But you, raise you your voice anew; resume your nocturnal hymns as it is meet to do at this festival. Let each one advance boldly into the retreats of our flowery meads, let him mingle in our dances, let him give vent to jesting, to wit and to satire. Enough of junketing, lead forward! let our voices praise the divine protectress with ardent love, yea! praise her, who promises to assure the welfare of this country for ever, in spite of Thorycion. Let our hymns now be addressed to Demeter, the Queen of Harvest, the goddess crowned with ears of corn; to her be dedicated the strains of our divine concerts. Oh! Demeter, who presidest over the pure mysteries, help us and protect thy choruses; far from all danger, may I continually yield myself to sports and dancing, mingle laughter with seriousness, as is fitting at thy festivals, and as the reward for my biting sarcasms may I wreathe my head with the triumphal fillets. And now let our songs summon hither the lovable goddess, who so often joins in our dances. Oh, venerated Dionysus, who hast created such soft melodies for this festival, come to accompany us to the goddess, show that you can traverse a long journey without wearying. Dionysus, the king of the dance, guide my steps. 'Tis thou who, to raise a laugh and for the sake of economy, hast torn our sandals and our garments; let us bound, let us dance at our pleasure, for we have nothing to spoil. Dionysus, king of the dance, guide my steps. Just now I saw through a corner of my eye a ravishing young girl, the companion of our sports; I saw the nipple of her bosom peeping through a rent in her tunic. Dionysus, king of the dance, guide my steps:


>CHORUS: Brandish the flaming torches and so revive their brilliancy. Iacchus, oh! Iacchus! bright luminary of our nocturnal Mysteries. The meadow sparkles with a thousand fires; the aged shake off the weight of cares and years; they have once more found limbs of steel, wherewith to take part in thy sacred measures; and do thou, blessed deity, lead the dances of youth upon this dewy carpet of flowers with a torch in thine hand. Silence, make way for our choirs, you profane and impure souls, who have neither been present at the festivals of the noble Muses, nor ever footed a dance in their honour, and who are not initiated into the mysterious language of the dithyrambs of the voracious Cratinus; away from here he who applauds misplaced buffoonery. Away from here the bad citizen, who for his private ends fans and nurses the flame of sedition, the chief who sells himself, when his country is weathering the storms, and surrenders either fortresses or ships; who, like Thorycion, the wretched collector of tolls, sends prohibited goods from Aigina to Epidaurus, such as oar-leathers, sailcloth and pitch, and who secures a subsidy for a hostile fleet, or soils the statues of Hecate, while he is humming some dithyramb. Away from here, the orator who nibbles at the salary of the poets, because he has been scouted in the ancient solemnities of Dionysus; to all such I say, and I repeat, and I say it again for the third time, "Make way for the choruses of the Initiate." But you, raise you your voice anew; resume your nocturnal hymns as it is meet to do at this festival. Let each one advance boldly into the retreats of our flowery meads, let him mingle in our dances, let him give vent to jesting, to wit and to satire. Enough of junketing, lead forward! let our voices praise the divine protectress with ardent love, yea! praise her, who promises to assure the welfare of this country for ever, in spite of Thorycion. Let our hymns now be addressed to Demeter, the Queen of Harvest, the goddess crowned with ears of corn; to her be dedicated the strains of our divine concerts. Oh! Demeter, who presidest over the pure mysteries, help us and protect thy choruses; far from all danger, may I continually yield myself to sports and dancing, mingle laughter with seriousness, as is fitting at thy festivals, and as the reward for my biting sarcasms may I wreathe my head with the triumphal fillets. And now let our songs summon hither the lovable goddess, who so often joins in our dances. Oh, venerated Dionysus, who hast created such soft melodies for this festival, come to accompany us to the goddess, show that you can traverse a long journey without wearying. Dionysus, the king of the dance, guide my steps. 'Tis thou who, to raise a laugh and for the sake of economy, hast torn our sandals and our garments; let us bound, let us dance at our pleasure, for we have nothing to spoil. Dionysus, king of the dance, guide my steps. Just now I saw through a corner of my eye a ravishing young girl, the companion of our sports; I saw the nipple of her bosom peeping through a rent in her tunic. Dionysus, king of the dance, guide my steps:
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN


θός εἰμι καὶ μετ' αὐτῆςDIONYSUS: Aye, I like to mingle with these choruses; I would fain dance and sport with that young girl. XANTHIAS: And I too. CHORUS: Would you like us to mock together at Archidemus? He is still awaiting his seven-year teeth to have himself entered as a citizen; but he is none the less a chief of the people among the Athenians and the greatest rascal of 'em all. I am told that Clisthenes is tearing the hair out of his rump and lacerating his cheeks on the tomb of Sebinus, the Anaphlystian; with his forehead against the ground, he is beating his bosom and groaning and calling him by name. As for Callias, the illustrious son of Hippobinus, the new Heracles, he is fighting a terrible battle of love on his galleys; dressed up in a lion's skin, he fights a fierce naval battle — with the girls' cunts. DIONYSUS: Could you tell us where Pluto dwells? We are strangers and have just arrived. CHORUS: Go no farther, and know without further question that you are at his gates. DIONYSUS: Slave, pick up your baggage. XANTHIAS: This wretched baggage, 'tis like Corinth, the daughter of Zeus, for it's always in his mouth. CHORUS: And now do ye, who take part in this religious festival, dance a gladsome round in the flowery grove in honour of the goddess. DIONYSUS: As for myself, I will go with the young girls and the women into the enclosure, where the nocturnal ceremonies are held; 'tis I will bear the sacred torch.


>DIONYSUS: Aye, I like to mingle with these choruses; I would fain dance and sport with that young girl. XANTHIAS: And I too. CHORUS: Would you like us to mock together at Archidemus? He is still awaiting his seven-year teeth to have himself entered as a citizen; but he is none the less a chief of the people among the Athenians and the greatest rascal of 'em all. I am told that Clisthenes is tearing the hair out of his rump and lacerating his cheeks on the tomb of Sebinus, the Anaphlystian; with his forehead against the ground, he is beating his bosom and groaning and calling him by name. As for Callias, the illustrious son of Hippobinus, the new Heracles, he is fighting a terrible battle of love on his galleys; dressed up in a lion's skin, he fights a fierce naval battle — with the girls' cunts. DIONYSUS: Could you tell us where Pluto dwells? We are strangers and have just arrived. CHORUS: Go no farther, and know without further question that you are at his gates. DIONYSUS: Slave, pick up your baggage. XANTHIAS: This wretched baggage, 'tis like Corinth, the daughter of Zeus, for it's always in his mouth. CHORUS: And now do ye, who take part in this religious festival, dance a gladsome round in the flowery grove in honour of the goddess. DIONYSUS: As for myself, I will go with the young girls and the women into the enclosure, where the nocturnal ceremonies are held; 'tis I will bear the sacred torch.
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN


λειμῶνας ἀνθεμώδειςCHORUS: Let us go into the meadows, that are sprinkled with roses, to form, according to our rites, the graceful choirs, over which the blessed Fates preside. 'Tis for us alone that the sun doth shine; his glorious rays illumine the Initiate, who have led the pious life, that is equally dear to strangers and citizens. DIONYSUS: Come now! how should we knock at this door? How do the dwellers in these parts knock? XANTHIAS: Lose no time and attack the door with vigour, if you have the courage of Heracles as well as his costume. DIONYSUS: Ho! there! Slave! AEACUS: Who's there? DIONYSUS: Heracles, the bold. AEACUS: Ah! wretched, impudent, shameless, threefold rascal, the most rascally of rascals. Ah! 'tis you who hunted out our dog Cerberus, whose keeper I was! But I have got you today; and the black stones of Styx, the rocks of Acheron, from which the blood is dripping, and the roaming dogs of Cocytus shall account to me for you; the hundred-headed Hydra shall tear your sides to pieces; the Tartessian Muraena shall fasten itself on your lungs and the Tithrasian Gorgons shall tear your kidneys and your gory entrails to shreds; I will go and fetch them as quickly as possible. XANTHIAS: Eh! what are you doing there? DIONYSUS (stooping down). I have just shit myself! Invoke the god. XANTHIAS: Get up at once. How a stranger would laugh, if he saw you.


>CHORUS: Let us go into the meadows, that are sprinkled with roses, to form, according to our rites, the graceful choirs, over which the blessed Fates preside. 'Tis for us alone that the sun doth shine; his glorious rays illumine the Initiate, who have led the pious life, that is equally dear to strangers and citizens. DIONYSUS: Come now! how should we knock at this door? How do the dwellers in these parts knock? XANTHIAS: Lose no time and attack the door with vigour, if you have the courage of Heracles as well as his costume. DIONYSUS: Ho! there! Slave! AEACUS: Who's there? DIONYSUS: Heracles, the bold. AEACUS: Ah! wretched, impudent, shameless, threefold rascal, the most rascally of rascals. Ah! 'tis you who hunted out our dog Cerberus, whose keeper I was! But I have got you today; and the black stones of Styx, the rocks of Acheron, from which the blood is dripping, and the roaming dogs of Cocytus shall account to me for you; the hundred-headed Hydra shall tear your sides to pieces; the Tartessian Muraena shall fasten itself on your lungs and the Tithrasian Gorgons shall tear your kidneys and your gory entrails to shreds; I will go and fetch them as quickly as possible. XANTHIAS: Eh! what are you doing there? DIONYSUS (stooping down). I have just shit myself! Invoke the god. XANTHIAS: Get up at once. How a stranger would laugh, if he saw you.
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Aristophanes, Peace, 130-134, 143, 147, 154-161, 169-172, 66, 97, 129 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

129. ἐν τοῖσιν Αἰσώπου λόγοις ἐξηυρέθη
3. Aristophanes, Frogs, 209-219, 22, 220, 234, 297, 312-315, 317-459, 464-480, 740, 1150 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1150. Διόνυσε πίνεις οἶνον οὐκ ἀνθοσμίαν.
4. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 947-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εὐπέταλος ἕλικι θάλλει.
5. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1363-1365, 1362 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1362. λαβοῦς', ἵν' αὐτὸν τωθάσω νεανικῶς
6. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1152, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 34.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

34.4. Accordingly, it seemed to Alcibiades that it would be a fine thing, enhancing his holiness in the eyes of the gods and his good repute in the minds of men, to restore its traditional fashion to the sacred festival by escorting the rite with his infantry along past the enemy by land. He would thus either thwart and humble Agis, if the king kept entirely quiet, or would fight a fight that was sacred and approved by the gods, in behalf of the greatest and holiest interests, in full sight of his native city, and with all his fellow citizens eye-witnesses of his valor.
8. Lucian, The Dance, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aiakos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
anapaests Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
anthesteria Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
antigone Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
anxiety dreams and nightmares Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
asia minor Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
athens Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
awakening, dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
ballet Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
birth Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
carnival, carnivalesque Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
chorus, ancient, greek, comic Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
cocytus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
comedy, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
comedy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
community with the gods, postmortemnan Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
cult songs Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dadouchos δᾳδοῦχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
dance, round / circular Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dance Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
death Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
demeter Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
didaskalia Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
dionysalexandros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
dionysos, awakening Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
dionysos, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
dionysos, dionysos limnaios/en lymnais Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
dionysos, dionysos ploutodotes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
dionysos, realm Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
dionysus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
dream figures Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
earth, earthly Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
echidna Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
eleusian mysteries Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
eleusis, eleusinian, mysteries Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
eleusis Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
family, parent-child, and death Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
funerary epigraphy Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
gorgon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
hades Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
hades place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
heracles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
iacchos ἴακχος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
iacchus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
immortality, of gods, eternal life Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
italy Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
lenaeans, lenai λῆναι Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
lenaia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
literature, greek, ancient Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
lucian of samosata Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
moira Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
mystai Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
mysteries, greater (of eleusis) Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 349
mysteries, mystery cults Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
mystery cults Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
mystes μύστης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
mystic Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
nature Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
omens Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
oracles Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
philosophy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
portents Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 386
post-mortality belief, bliss Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
post-mortality belief, representation of, greek context Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
procession (pompe) Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
purity Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
roads, sacred to eleusis Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 349
salvation Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
sanctuary Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
search scenes Gianvittorio-Ungar and Schlapbach, Choreonarratives: Dancing Stories in Greek and Roman Antiquity and Beyond (2021) 45
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
sparagmós σπαραγμός Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
tartesian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
theater, theatrical, metatheatre, metatheatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 372
thyiads, thyiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
tithrasian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109
underworld Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 119
virginity Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 58
wine Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109, 372
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 109