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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1209
Aristophanes, Frogs, 1032-1035
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

31 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 110-111, 109 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

109. Filling both land and sea, while every day
2. Aristophanes, Birds, 982, 962 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

962. ὡς ἔστι Βάκιδος χρησμὸς ἄντικρυς λέγων
3. Aristophanes, Knights, 123 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

123. ὦ Βάκι. τί ἔστι; δὸς τὸ ποτήριον ταχύ.
4. Aristophanes, Peace, 1095, 1071 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1071. μηδὲ Βάκις θνητούς, μηδ' αὖ νύμφαι Βάκιν αὐτὸν—
5. Aristophanes, Frogs, 1027-1031, 1033-1035, 1039, 1044-1064, 1026 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1026. εἶτα διδάξας Πέρσας μετὰ τοῦτ' ἐπιθυμεῖν ἐξεδίδαξα
6. Euripides, Hippolytus, 949-957, 948 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Rhesus, 943 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

943. The light of thy great Mysteries was shed
8. Herodotus, Histories, 2.53, 2.81, 5.90.2, 6.57.4, 7.6.3, 8.77.2, 8.96.2, 9.43.2 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.53. But whence each of the gods came to be, or whether all had always been, and how they appeared in form, they did not know until yesterday or the day before, so to speak; ,for I suppose Hesiod and Homer flourished not more than four hundred years earlier than I; and these are the ones who taught the Greeks the descent of the gods, and gave the gods their names, and determined their spheres and functions, and described their outward forms. ,But the poets who are said to have been earlier than these men were, in my opinion, later. The earlier part of all this is what the priestesses of Dodona tell; the later, that which concerns Hesiod and Homer, is what I myself say. 2.81. They wear linen tunics with fringes hanging about the legs, called “calasiris,” and loose white woolen mantles over these. But nothing woolen is brought into temples, or buried with them: that is impious. ,They agree in this with practices called Orphic and Bacchic, but in fact Egyptian and Pythagorean: for it is impious, too, for one partaking of these rites to be buried in woolen wrappings. There is a sacred legend about this. 5.90.2. Furthermore, they were spurred on by the oracles which foretold that many deeds of enmity would be perpetrated against them by the Athenians. Previously they had had no knowledge of these oracles but now Cleomenes brought them to Sparta, and the Lacedaemonians learned their contents. It was from the Athenian acropolis that Cleomenes took the oracles, which had been in the possession of the Pisistratidae earlier. When they were exiled, they left them in the temple from where they were retrieved by Cleomenes. 6.57.4. They keep all oracles that are given, though the Pythians also know them. The kings alone judge cases concerning the rightful possessor of an unwedded heiress, if her father has not betrothed her, and cases concerning public roads. 7.6.3. They had come up to Sardis with Onomacritus, an Athenian diviner who had set in order the oracles of Musaeus. They had reconciled their previous hostility with him; Onomacritus had been banished from Athens by Pisistratus' son Hipparchus, when he was caught by Lasus of Hermione in the act of interpolating into the writings of Musaeus an oracle showing that the islands off Lemnos would disappear into the sea. 8.77.2. quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Bronze will come together with bronze, and Ares /l lWill redden the sea with blood. To Hellas the day of freedom /l lFar-seeing Zeus and august Victory will bring. /l /quote Considering this, I dare to say nothing against Bacis concerning oracles when he speaks so plainly, nor will I consent to it by others. 8.96.2. A west wind had caught many of the wrecks and carried them to the shore in Attica called Colias. Thus not only was all the rest of the oracle fulfilled which Bacis and Musaeus had spoken about this battle, but also what had been said many years before this in an oracle by Lysistratus, an Athenian soothsayer, concerning the wrecks carried to shore there. Its meaning had eluded all the Hellenes: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"The Colian women will cook with oars. /l lBut this was to happen after the king had marched away. /l /quote 9.43.2. quote type="oracle" l met="dact"By Thermodon's stream and the grass-grown banks of Asopus, /l lWill be a gathering of Greeks for fight and the ring of the barbarian's war-cry; /l lMany a Median archer, by death untimely overtaken will fall /l lThere in the battle when the day of his doom is upon him. /l /quote I know that these verses and others very similar to them from Musaeus referred to the Persians. As for the river Thermodon, it flows between Tanagra and Glisas.
9. Hippias of Elis, Fragments, 6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Hippias of Elis, Fragments, 6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

41a. after leaving behind these who claim to be judges, shall find those who are really judges who are said to sit in judgment there, Minos and Rhadamanthus, and Aeacus and Triptolemus, and all the other demigods who were just men in their lives, would the change of habitation be undesirable? Or again, what would any of you give to meet with Orpheus and Musaeus and Hesiod and Homer? I am willing to die many times over, if these things are true; for I personally should find the life there wonderful
12. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

782c. Ath. The custom of men sacrificing one another is, in fact, one that survives even now among many peoples; whereas amongst others we hear of how the opposite custom existed, when they were forbidden so much as to eat an ox, and their offerings to the gods consisted, not of animals, but of cakes of meal and grain steeped in honey, and other such bloodless sacrifices, and from flesh they abstained as though it were unholy to eat it or to stain with blood the altars of the gods; instead of that, those of us men who then existed lived what is called an Orphic life, keeping wholly to iimate food and
13. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

69c. from all these things, and self-restraint and justice and courage and wisdom itself are a kind of purification. And I fancy that those men who established the mysteries were not unenlightened, but in reality had a hidden meaning when they said long ago that whoever goes uninitiated and unsanctified to the other world will lie in the mire, but he who arrives there initiated and purified will dwell with the gods. For as they say in the mysteries, the thyrsus-bearers are many, but the mystics few ;
14. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

364b. and disregard those who are in any way weak or poor, even while admitting that they are better men than the others. But the strangest of all these speeches are the things they say about the gods and virtue, how so it is that the gods themselves assign to many good men misfortunes and an evil life but to their opposites a contrary lot; and begging priests and soothsayers go to rich men’s doors and make them believe that they by means of sacrifices and incantations have accumulated a treasure of power from the gods that can expiate and cure with pleasurable festival
15. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 8.1.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens, for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily .
16. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.107 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.107. Suppose that there are such images constantly impinging on our minds: but that is only the presentation of a certain form — surely not also of a reason for supposing that this form is happy and eternal? "But what is the nature of these images of yours, and whence do they arise? This extravagance, it is true, is borrowed from Democritus; but he has been widely criticized, nor can you find a satisfactory explanation, and the whole affair is a lame and impotent business. For how can be more improbable than that images of Homer, Archilochus, Romulus, Numa, Pythagoras and Plato should impinge on me at all — much less that they should do so in the actual shape that those men really bore? How then do these images arise? and of whom are they the images? Aristotle tells us that the poet Orpheus never existed, and the Pythagoreans say that the Orphic poem which we possess was the work of a certain Cecrops; yet Orpheus, that is, according to you, the image of him, often comes into my mind.
17. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

18. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.96.2, 4.66.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.96.2.  For the priests of Egypt recount from the records of their sacred books that they were visited in early times by Orpheus, Musaeus, Melampus, and Daedalus, also by the poet Homer and Lycurgus of Sparta, later by Solon of Athens and the philosopher Plato, and that there also came Pythagoras of Samos and the mathematician Eudoxus, as well as Democritus of Abdera and Oenopides of Chios. 4.66.5.  Consequently the Cadmeans left the city, as the seer had counselled them to do, and gathered for refuge by month in a place in Boeotia called Tilphossaeum. Thereupon the Epigoni took the city and sacked it, and capturing Daphnê, the daughter of Teiresias, they dedicated her, in accordance with a certain vow, to the service of the temple at Delphi as an offering to the god of the first-fruits of the booty.
19. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 2.19.1-2.19.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.19.1.  Indeed, there is no tradition among the Romans either of Caelus being castrated by his own sons or of Saturn destroying his own offspring to secure himself from their attempts or of Jupiter dethroning Saturn and confining his own father in the dungeon of Tartarus, or, indeed, of wars, wounds, or bonds of the gods, or of their servitude among men. 2.19.2.  And no festival is observed among them as a day of mourning or by the wearing of black garments and the beating of breasts and the lamentations of women because of the disappearance of deities, such as the Greeks perform in commemorating the rape of Persephonê and the adventures of Dionysus and all the other things of like nature. And one will see among them, even though their manners are now corrupted, no ecstatic transports, no Corybantic frenzies, no begging under the colour of religion, no bacchanals or secret mysteries, no all-night vigils of men and women together in the temples, nor any other mummery of this kind; but alike in all their words and actions with respect to the gods a reverence is shown such as is seen among neither Greeks nor barbarians.
20. Horace, Ars Poetica, 392-393, 391 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

21. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.16. Also resembling these rites are the Cotytian and the Bendideian rites practiced among the Thracians, among whom the Orphic rites had their beginning. Now the Cotys who is worshipped among the Edonians, and also the instruments used in her rites, are mentioned by Aeschylus; for he says,O adorable Cotys among the Edonians, and ye who hold mountain-ranging instruments; and he mentions immediately afterwards the attendants of Dionysus: one, holding in his hands the bombyces, toilsome work of the turner's chisel, fills full the fingered melody, the call that brings on frenzy, while another causes to resound the bronze-bound cotylae and again,stringed instruments raise their shrill cry, and frightful mimickers from some place unseen bellow like bulls, and the semblance of drums, as of subterranean thunder, rolls along, a terrifying sound; for these rites resemble the Phrygian rites, and it is at least not unlikely that, just as the Phrygians themselves were colonists from Thrace, so also their sacred rites were borrowed from there. Also when they identify Dionysus and the Edonian Lycurgus, they hint at the homogeneity of their sacred rites.
22. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.5.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε.
23. Plutarch, Oracles At Delphi No Longer Given In Verse, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 18 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. But, since it is affirmed by some that, although these are only images, yet there exist gods in honour of whom they are made; and that the supplications and sacrifices presented to the images are to be referred to the gods, and are in fact made to the gods; and that there is not any other way of coming to them, for 'Tis hard for man To meet in presence visible a God; and whereas, in proof that such is the fact, they adduce the energies possessed by certain images, let us examine into the power attached to their names. And I would beseech you, greatest of emperors, before I enter on this discussion, to be indulgent to me while I bring forward true considerations; for it is not my design to show the fallacy of idols, but, by disproving the calumnies vented against us, to offer a reason for the course of life we follow. May you, by considering yourselves, be able to discover the heavenly kingdom also! For as all things are subservient to you, father and son, who have received the kingdom from above (for the king's soul is in the hand of God, Proverbs 21:1 says the prophetic Spirit), so to the one God and the Logos proceeding from Him, the Son, apprehended by us as inseparable from Him, all things are in like manner subjected. This then especially I beg you carefully to consider. The gods, as they affirm, were not from the beginning, but every one of them has come into existence just like ourselves. And in this opinion they all agree. Homer speaks of Old Oceanus, The sire of gods, and Tethys; and Orpheus (who, moreover, was the first to invent their names, and recounted their births, and narrated the exploits of each, and is believed by them to treat with greater truth than others of divine things, whom Homer himself follows in most matters, especially in reference to the gods)- he, too, has fixed their first origin to be from water:- Oceanus, the origin of all. For, according to him, water was the beginning of all things, and from water mud was formed, and from both was produced an animal, a dragon with the head of a lion growing to it, and between the two heads there was the face of a god, named Heracles and Kronos. This Heracles generated an egg of enormous size, which, on becoming full, was, by the powerful friction of its generator, burst into two, the part at the top receiving the form of heaven (οὐρανός), and the lower part that of earth (γῆ). The goddess Gê moreover, came forth with a body; and Ouranos, by his union with Gê, begot females, Clotho, Lachesis, and Atropos; and males, the hundred-handed Cottys, Gyges, Briareus, and the Cyclopes Brontes, and Steropes, and Argos, whom also he bound and hurled down to Tartarus, having learned that he was to be ejected from his government by his children; whereupon Gê, being enraged, brought forth the Titans. The godlike Gaia bore to Ouranos Sons who are by the name of Titans known, Because they vengeance took on Ouranos, Majestic, glitt'ring with his starry crown.
25. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

26. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 5.20.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Lucian, The Dance, 15 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.30.2, 10.12.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.30.2. of the gods, the Aeginetans worship most Hecate, in whose honor every year they celebrate mystic rites which, they say, Orpheus the Thracian established among them. Within the enclosure is a temple; its wooden image is the work of Myron, fl. c. 460 B.C. and it has one face and one body. It was Alcamenes, A contemporary of Pheidias. in my opinion, who first made three images of Hecate attached to one another, a figure called by the Athenians Epipurgidia (on the Tower); it stands beside the temple of the Wingless Victory. 10.12.2. Herophile was younger than she was, but nevertheless she too was clearly born before the Trojan war, as she foretold in her oracles that Helen would be brought up in Sparta to be the ruin of Asia and of Europe, and that for her sake the Greeks would capture Troy . The Delians remember also a hymn this woman composed to Apollo. In her poem she calls herself not only Herophile but also Artemis, and the wedded wife of Apollo, saying too sometimes that she is his sister, and sometimes that she is his daughter.
29. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 21.118-21.123 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

30. Jerome, Adversus Jovinianum, 2.14 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

31. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 567, 625, 627, 485



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
agōn Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
alexandria deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 226
allegory deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 226
amphilytos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 250
antiphanes Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120, 145
apollo Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 81, 84
arabia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 79
areopagos, books of oracles Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 250
aristophanes Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120, 145
aristotle de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
audience de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
bassareus (dionysus) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
bassarids Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
bassaroi Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
bernabé, a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120, 145
blessed de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
cannibal, cannibalism Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 79, 80, 81, 84
casadesús bordoy, f. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 169
casadio, g. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
catharsis de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
child Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 79, 80, 81
digression Clay and Vergados, Teaching through Images: Imagery in Greco-Roman Didactic Poetry (2022) 18
dionysiac mysteries Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 119
dionysus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 145
egypt deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 145, 226
eleusis/eleusinian de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
empousa de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
eschatology deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 64
ethos, in against aristogiton i Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 198
etymology de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
euripides Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120, 145; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
exaggeration/hyperbolē Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
face Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
focalization de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
focalizer de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
frenzy, mania, madness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 79, 81, 84
heroism Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 44
hesiod Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 145
hieronymus Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
hipparchos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 250
homer Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 145
huffman, c.a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 145, 169
initiates de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
initiation/rite of passage Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 80
intentionality/poetological intention/purpose Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
jiménez san cristóbal, a. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
language, mousaios Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 250
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
masks Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
messenger-speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
metamorphosis de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
metaphor Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
moses deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 145, 226
musaeus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 226
mystery cult Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 80
narrative/narration passim, micro-narrative in tragedy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
narratology, affective/cognitive de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
onomakritos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 250
oracle Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 81
oratory/rhetoric Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
orpheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 79, 80, 81, 84; Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120, 145
orphism Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 198
pain/suffering de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
pan Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 79
persephone / core deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 64
petelia, hipponion Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 44
petelia, orphic life Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 44
pinnoy, m. Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
plato Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120, 145, 169
plurality de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
plutarch Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 120
porphyry Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 145
prodicus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 80
pythagoras' Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 145
pythagoras Cornelli, In Search of Pythagoreanism: Pythagoreanism as an Historiographical Category (2013) 169
pythagoras / (neo-)pythagoreanism deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 64, 226
pythagorean Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 44
rites deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 64, 145
rome deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 64
sacrifice Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 262
sarkophagía Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 262
soul, of dead de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
stoa poikilē Kanellakis, Aristophanes and the Poetics of Surprise (2020) 190
style, poetic Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 198
sun Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
teletai de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294
theophrastus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 84
trojan war de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
trojan women de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
troy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
utopian Edmonds, Myths of the Underworld Journey: Plato, Aristophanes, and the ‘Orphic’ Gold Tablets (2004) 44
vegetarianism Nihan and Frevel, Purity and the Forming of Religious Traditions in the Ancient Mediterranean World and Ancient Judaism (2013) 262
women, perspective of de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 327
zeus deJauregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010), 64, 145, 226
zoroaster de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 294