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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1206
Aristophanes, Clouds, 984


ἀρχαῖά γε καὶ Διιπολιώδη καὶ τεττίγων ἀνάμεσταUNJUST DISCOURSE: What antiquated rubbish! Have we got back to the days of the festivals of Zeus Polieus (Dipolia?), to the Buphonia, to the time of the poet Cecydes and the golden cicadas? JUST DISCOURSE: 'Tis nevertheless by suchlike teaching I built up the men of Marathon. But you, you teach the children of today to bundle themselves quickly into their clothes, and I am enraged when I see them at the Panathenaea forgetting Athene while they dance, and covering themselves with their bucklers. Hence, young man, dare to range yourself beside me, who follow justice and truth; you will then be able to shun the public place, to refrain from the baths, to blush at all that is shameful, to fire up if your virtue is mocked at, to give place to your elders, to honour your parents, in short, to avoid all that is evil. Be modesty itself, and do not run to applaud the dancing girls; if you delight in such scenes, some courtesan will cast you her apple and your reputation will be done for. Do not bandy words with your father, nor treat him as a dotard, nor reproach the old man, who has cherished you, with his age.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 112-137, 111 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

111. πέμπει σὺν δορὶ καὶ χερὶ πράκτορι 111. Despatched, with spear and executing hand
2. Aeschylus, Persians, 206-210, 205 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

205. ὁρῶ δὲ φεύγοντʼ αἰετὸν πρὸς ἐσχάραν 205. But I saw an eagle fleeing for safety to the altar of Phoebus—and out of terror, my friends, I stood speechless. Thereupon I caught sight of a falcon rushing at full speed with outstretched wings and with his talons plucking at the head of the eagle, which did nothing but cower and
3. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 1001-1232, 247-279, 504, 960-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. ἀκούετε λεῴ: κατὰ τὰ πάτρια τοὺς Χοᾶς
4. Aristophanes, Birds, 137-142, 1549-1552, 1583-1590, 1641-1673, 619, 1296 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1296. ἶβις Λυκούργῳ, Χαιρεφῶντι νυκτερίς
5. Aristophanes, Women of The Assembly, 731-739, 730 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

730. χώρει σὺ δεῦρο κιναχύρα καλὴ καλῶς
6. Aristophanes, Knights, 986-996, 985 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

985. ἀλλὰ καὶ τόδ' ἔγωγε θαυμάζω
7. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1001-1111, 1240, 1467-1471, 1473-1474, 1476-1480, 252, 263-274, 297, 314-424, 498, 519-520, 534-574, 627, 818-831, 882-983, 985-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. εἰ ταῦτ' ὦ μειράκιον πείσει τούτῳ, νὴ τὸν Διόνυσον
8. Aristophanes, Peace, 178-180, 182-194, 201-202, 420, 528-532, 724, 876, 879, 177 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

177. ἀτὰρ ἐγγὺς εἶναι τῶν θεῶν ἐμοὶ δοκῶ
9. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 149-159, 582-586, 627, 87-92, 130 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

130. αὐτίκα γὰρ ἄρχει διὰ τίν' ὁ Ζεὺς τῶν θεῶν;
10. Aristophanes, Frogs, 505-507, 504 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

504. ἡ γὰρ θεός ς' ὡς ἐπύθεθ' ἥκοντ', εὐθέως
11. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 743-747, 272 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

272. ὄμνυμι τοίνυν αἰθέρ' οἴκησιν Διός.
12. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1026-1028, 1030, 578, 1025 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1025. οὐδὲ παλαίστρας περικωμάζειν πειρῶν: οὐδ' εἴ τις ἐραστὴς
13. Herodotus, Histories, 2.81, 5.65-5.68 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.81. They wear linen tunics with fringes hanging about the legs, called “calasiris,” and loose white woolen mantles over these. But nothing woolen is brought into temples, or buried with them: that is impious. ,They agree in this with practices called Orphic and Bacchic, but in fact Egyptian and Pythagorean: for it is impious, too, for one partaking of these rites to be buried in woolen wrappings. There is a sacred legend about this. 5.65. The Lacedaemonians would never have taken the Pisistratid stronghold. First of all they had no intention to blockade it, and secondly the Pisistratidae were well furnished with food and drink. The Lacedaemonians would only have besieged the place for a few days and then returned to Sparta. As it was, however, there was a turn of fortune which harmed the one party and helped the other, for the sons of the Pisistratid family were taken as they were being secretly carried out of the country. ,When this happened, all their plans were confounded, and they agreed to depart from Attica within five days on the terms prescribed to them by the Athenians in return for the recovery of their children. ,Afterwards they departed to Sigeum on the Scamander. They had ruled the Athenians for thirty-six years and were in lineage of the house of Pylos and Neleus, born of the same ancestors as the families of Codrus and Melanthus, who had formerly come from foreign parts to be kings of Athens. ,It was for this reason that Hippocrates gave his son the name Pisistratus as a remembrance, calling him after Pisistratus the son of Nestor. ,This is the way, then, that the Athenians got rid of their tyrants. As regards all the noteworthy things which they did or endured after they were freed and before Ionia revolted from Darius and Aristagoras of Miletus came to Athens to ask help of its people, of these I will first give an account. 5.66. Athens, which had been great before, now grew even greater when her tyrants had been removed. The two principal holders of power were Cleisthenes an Alcmaeonid, who was reputed to have bribed the Pythian priestess, and Isagoras son of Tisandrus, a man of a notable house but his lineage I cannot say. His kinsfolk, at any rate, sacrifice to Zeus of Caria. ,These men with their factions fell to contending for power, Cleisthenes was getting the worst of it in this dispute and took the commons into his party. Presently he divided the Athenians into ten tribes instead of four as formerly. He called none after the names of the sons of Ion—Geleon, Aegicores, Argades, and Hoples—but invented for them names taken from other heroes, all native to the country except Aias. Him he added despite the fact that he was a stranger because he was a neighbor and an ally. 5.67. In doing this, to my thinking, this Cleisthenes was imitating his own mother's father, Cleisthenes the tyrant of Sicyon, for Cleisthenes, after going to war with the Argives, made an end of minstrels' contests at Sicyon by reason of the Homeric poems, in which it is the Argives and Argos which are primarily the theme of the songs. Furthermore, he conceived the desire to cast out from the land Adrastus son of Talaus, the hero whose shrine stood then as now in the very marketplace of Sicyon because he was an Argive. ,He went then to Delphi, and asked the oracle if he should cast Adrastus out, but the priestess said in response: “Adrastus is king of Sicyon, and you but a stone thrower.” When the god would not permit him to do as he wished in this matter, he returned home and attempted to devise some plan which might rid him of Adrastus. When he thought he had found one, he sent to Boeotian Thebes saying that he would gladly bring Melanippus son of Astacus into his country, and the Thebans handed him over. ,When Cleisthenes had brought him in, he consecrated a sanctuary for him in the government house itself, where he was established in the greatest possible security. Now the reason why Cleisthenes brought in Melanippus, a thing which I must relate, was that Melanippus was Adrastus' deadliest enemy, for Adrastus had slain his brother Mecisteus and his son-in-law Tydeus. ,Having then designated the precinct for him, Cleisthenes took away all Adrastus' sacrifices and festivals and gave them to Melanippus. The Sicyonians had been accustomed to pay very great honor to Adrastus because the country had once belonged to Polybus, his maternal grandfather, who died without an heir and bequeathed the kingship to him. ,Besides other honors paid to Adrastus by the Sicyonians, they celebrated his lamentable fate with tragic choruses in honor not of Dionysus but of Adrastus. Cleisthenes, however, gave the choruses back to Dionysus and the rest of the worship to Melanippus. 5.68. This, then, is what he did regarding Adrastus, but as for the tribes of the Dorians, he changed their names so that these tribes should not be shared by Sicyonians and Argives. In this especially he made a laughing-stock of the Sicyonians, for he gave the tribes names derived from the words ‘donkey’ and ‘pig’ changing only the endings. The name of his own tribe, however, he did not change in this way, but rather gave it a name indicating his own rule, calling it Archelaoi, rulers of the people. The rest were Swinites, Assites and Porkites. ,These were the names of the tribes which the Sicyonians used under Cleisthenes' rule and for sixty years more after his death. Afterwards, however, they took counsel together and both changed the names of three to Hylleis, Pamphyli, and Dymanatae, and added a fourth which they called Aegialeis after Aegialeus son of Adrastus.
14. Plato, Crito, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

50d. I find no fault, I should say. Or with those that have to do with the nurture of the child after he is born and with his education which you, like others, received? Did those of us who are assigned to these matters not give good directions when we told your father to educate you in music and gymnastics?
15. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1659 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.38.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.38.1. Further, we provide plenty of means for the mind to refresh itself from business. We celebrate games and sacrifices all the year round, and the elegance of our private establishments forms a daily source of pleasure and helps to banish the spleen;
17. Plautus, Amphitruo, 1054-1056, 1053 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

18. Plutarch, Themistocles, 1.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.24.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.24.4. and there are statues of Zeus, one made by Leochares See Paus. 1.1.3 . and one called Polieus (Urban), the customary mode of sacrificing to whom I will give without adding the traditional reason thereof. Upon the altar of Zeus Polieus they place barley mixed with wheat and leave it unguarded. The ox, which they keep already prepared for sacrifice, goes to the altar and partakes of the grain. One of the priests they call the ox-slayer, who kills the ox and then, casting aside the axe here according to the ritual runs away. The others bring the axe to trial, as though they know not the man who did the deed.
20. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 3.38, 3.57 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.38. There is a story that the Phaedrus was his first dialogue. For the subject has about it something of the freshness of youth. Dicaearchus, however, censures its whole style as vulgar.A story is told that Plato once saw some one playing at dice and rebuked him. And, upon his protesting that he played for a trifle only, But the habit, rejoined Plato, is not a trifle. Being asked whether there would be any memoirs of him as of his predecessors, he replied, A man must first make a name, and he will have no lack of memoirs. One day, when Xenocrates had come in, Plato asked him to chastise his slave, since he was unable to do it himself because he was in a passion. 3.57. Now, says Thrasylus, the genuine dialogues are fifty-six in all, if the Republic be divided into ten and the Laws into twelve. Favorinus, however, in the second book of his Miscellaneous History declares that nearly the whole of the Republic is to be found in a work of Protagoras entitled Controversies. This gives nine tetralogies, if the Republic takes the place of one single work and the Laws of another. His first tetralogy has a common plan underlying it, for he wishes to describe what the life of the philosopher will be. To each of the works Thrasylus affixes a double title, the one taken from the name of the interlocutor, the other from the subject.
21. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.29-2.30 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.29. 29.For formerly, as we have before observed, when men sacrificed to the Gods fruits and not animals, and did not assume the latter for food, it is said, that a common sacrifice being celebrated at Athens, one Diomus, or Sopater, who was not a native, but cultivated some land in Attica, seizing a sharp axe which was near to him, and being excessively indigt, struck with it an ox, who, coming from his labour, approached to a table, on which were openly placed cakes and other offerings which were to be burnt as a sacrifice to the Gods, and ate some, but trampled on the rest of the offerings. The ox, therefore, being killed, Diomus, whose anger was now appeased, at the same time perceived what kind of deed he had perpetrated. And the ox, indeed, he buried. But embracing a voluntary banishment, as if he had been accused of impiety, he fled to Crete. A great dryness, however, taking place in the Attic land from vehement heat, and a dreadful sterility of fruit, and the Pythian deity being in consequence of it consulted by the general consent, the God answered, that the Cretan exile must expiate the crime; and that, if the murderer was punished, and the statue of the slain ox was erected in the place in which it fell, this would be beneficial both to those who had and those who had not tasted its flesh. An inquiry therefore being made into the affair, and Sopater, together with the deed, having been discovered, he, thinking that he should be liberated from the difficulty in which he was now involved, through the accusation of impiety, if the same thing was done by all men in common, said to those who came to him, that it was necessary an ox should be slain by the city. But, on their being dubious who should strike the ox, he said that he would undertake to do it, if they would make him a citizen, and would be partakers with him of the slaughter. This, therefore, being granted, they returned to the city, and ordered the deed to be accomplished in such a way as it is performed by them at present, [and which was as follows:] SPAN 2.30. 30.They selected virgins who were drawers of water; but these brought water for the purpose of sharpening an axe and a knife. And these being sharpened, one person gave the axe, another struck with it the ox, |62 and a third person cut the throat of the ox. But after this, having excoriated the animal, all that were present ate of its flesh. These things therefore being performed, they sewed up the hide of the ox, and having stuffed it with straw, raised it upright in the same form which it had when alive, and yoked it to a plough, as if it was about to work with it. Instituting also a judicial process, respecting the slaughter of the ox, they cited all those who were partakers of the deed, to defend their conduct. But as the drawers of water accused those who sharpened the axe and the knife, as more culpable than themselves, and those who sharpened these instruments accused him who gave the axe, and he accused him who cut the throat of the ox, and this last person accused the knife,---hence, as the knife could not speak, they condemned it as the cause of the slaughter. From that time also, even till now, during the festival sacred to Jupiter, in the Acropolis, at Athens, the sacrifice of an ox is performed after the same manner. For, placing cakes on a brazen table, they drive oxen round it, and the ox that tastes of the cakes that are distributed on the table, is slain. The race likewise of those who perform this, still remains. And all those, indeed, who derive their origin from Sopater are called boutupoi [i.e. slayers of oxen]; but those who are descended from him that drove the ox round the table, are called kentriadai, [or stimulators.] And those who originate from him that cut the throat of the ox, are denominated daitroi, [or dividers,] on account of the banquet which takes place from the distribution of flesh. But when they have filled the hide, and the judicial process is ended, they throw the knife into the sea. SPAN
22. Epigraphy, Lsam, 9

23. Epigraphy, Seg, 45.1508

24. Epigraphy, Ig Ii3, 337



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
academic skepticism Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
achilles and patroklos, as pederasty Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 112
acropolis, athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
adonia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
agamemnon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 123
air (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
alkibiades, and the mysteries Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
amphitryo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
andokides, genos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
angel Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
animals Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
anthesteria (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
antilogia Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123, 125
archôn basileus Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643
aristophanes, clouds Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
aristophanes Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
aristotimus Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
artemis (goddess) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
asklepios, introduction to athens Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
athena, hygeia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
athena, soteira Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
athena Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
athena (goddess), bouphonia ritual Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
athens, sanctuary of artemis agrotera Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
athens, sanctuary of artemis aristoboule Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
athens Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 125
attica Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
audience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
beating Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
bendis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
better argument (in aristophanes clouds) Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
bird, omen Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
boreas (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
bouzygai/es Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643, 682
brauron Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33; Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
brauronia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
carneades Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
chaos (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
charmadas Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106, 123
christianity, christians Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
clouds (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106, 123
comedy, on pederasty Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 112, 122
cronia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
cult, change/continuity over time Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
cult, foundation/origin stories Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
cult, regional networks (amphictionies) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
cult Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106, 125
cultic ritual practice, feasting Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
daimons Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
dangour, armand Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
dialogues Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
diasia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 123, 125
diisoteria (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
dinos (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
dionysia, city Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643
dionysia, great and rural (festivals) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
dipolieia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643, 682
dipolieia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 123
dramaturgy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 123
eagle Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
education Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
education (music), classical Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
education (music), lyre Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
eleusis Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
empty-space-aniconism Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, reversal epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
erchia Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
euruproktos Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 224
excess, of appetites Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 224
favorinus of arles Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
festival Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 123, 125
festivals, artemis brauronia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
garden party, relief from nineveh Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
gephyraioi Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643
glaukon and leagros of kerameis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
helios Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
hephaistos Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
heracles Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 106
herald Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643
hero, comic hero Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
hero Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
herodotos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
iconography, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
intercourse, sexual, anal Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 112, 122
iris Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
isis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
isokrates, areopagitikos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
jupiter Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
kallias iii, marriages Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
libya Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
lifeworld, lifeworld experience Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
lykourgos, family and kin Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
lyres/lyrody/citharas/citharists, and education/instruction in Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
lyres/lyrody/citharas/citharists, depicted on vases Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
lysias (orator) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
malkin, irad Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
meidias painter Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
menelaus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
metrodorus Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
misgolas Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 190
monotheism / monotheist Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
mother Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
mycenaean age Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
myth/mythology, foundation myths Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
myth Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
neighbor, neighborhood Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
nikomachos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
nineveh, garden-party relief Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
old comedy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 106
olympic games Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
onesimos (painter) Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
pan Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
pan (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
panathenaea (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
panathenaia Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643
panhellenism Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
parabasis Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
parker, robert c. t. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
parody Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
parthenon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
peace / eirene (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
pederasty, in athens Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 112, 122
pericles Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 5
persian wars Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
persians Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
personification of abstract notions Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
phaedimus Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
pheidippides Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
phidias Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
piraeus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
plato, crito, education Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
plato, education Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
plot, emplotment Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
plot Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
ploughing, ritual Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643
pluralization, of gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
plutarch, on themistocles Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
polytheism, polytheists Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 125
popular morality in athens Blondell and Ormand, Ancient Sex: New Essays (2015) 190
poseidon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 106, 123
prayer Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
procession Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
prometheus Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
protagoras Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
rage / lyssa (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
rationalism/rationalization Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682
reason Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
reflectory/phrontisterion/thinkery Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
religion/theology, old vs. new Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
respiration (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
ritual Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22, 125
rival, rivalry, cf. enemy Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
rome Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
sacrifice Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
sacrifice (thysia), ancestral (patria) vs. additional (epitheta) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
sacrifice (thysia), rules and prescriptions' Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
satire Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
sign Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
soclarus Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
socrates Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106, 123; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
sophistic Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
sophists, sophistry Jażdżewska and Doroszewski,Plutarch and his Contemporaries: Sharing the Roman Empire (2024) 120
statue, divine Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
strepsiades Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123; Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 302
thargelia expulsion of scapegoats at Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 5
themistocles Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
theseia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
thesmophoria (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
thunderbolt Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
todd, s. c. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 33
tongue (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
tragedy, pederasty Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 112
triballian gods Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 22
vase paintings, depicting education Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
vase paintings, singing Cosgrove, Music at Social Meals in Greek and Roman Antiquity: From the Archaic Period to the Age of Augustine (2022) 74
war (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106
wealth (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 106, 123
zeus, ammon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
zeus, epi palladiôi Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 643
zeus, meilichius Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
zeus, polieus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125
zeus, soter Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 682; Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 125