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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1206
Aristophanes, Clouds, 604-803
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κωμαστὴς Διόνυσος.As we were preparing to come here, we were hailed by the Moon and were charged to wish joy and happiness both to the Athenians and to their allies; further, she said that she was enraged and that you treated her very shamefully, her, who does not pay you in words alone, but who renders you all real benefits. Firstly, thanks to her, you save at least a drachma each month for lights, for each, as he is leaving home at night, says, "Slave, buy no torches, for the moonlight is beautiful," — not to name a thousand other benefits. Nevertheless you do not reckon the days correctly and your calendar is naught but confusion. Consequently the gods load her with threats each time they get home and are disappointed of their meal, because the festival has not been kept in the regular order of time. When you should be sacrificing, you are putting to the torture or administering justice. And often, we others, the gods, are fasting in token of mourning for the death of Memnon or Sarpedon, while you are devoting yourselves to joyous libations. 'Tis for this, that last year, when the lot would have invested Hyperbolus with the duty of Amphictyon, we took his crown from him, to teach him that time must be divided according to the phases of the moon.
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μὰ τὴν ̓Αναπνοὴν μὰ τὸ Χάος μὰ τὸν ̓ΑέραSOCRATES: By Respiration! By Chaos! By the Air! I have never seen a man so gross, so inept, so stupid, so forgetful. All the little quibbles, which I teach him, he forgets even before he has learnt them. Yet I will not give it up, I will make him come out here into the open air. Where are you, Strepsiades? Come, bring your couch out here. STREPSIADES: But the bugs will not allow me to bring it. SOCRATES: Have done with such nonsense! place it there and pay attention. STREPSIADES: Well, here I am. SOCRATES: Good! Which science of all those you have never been taught, do you wish to learn first? The measures, the rhythms or the verses? STREPSIADES: Why, the measures; the flour dealer cheated me out of two choenixes the other day. SOCRATES: 'Tis not about that I ask you, but which, according to you, is the best measure, the trimeter or the tetrameter? STREPSIADES: The one I prefer is the semisextarius. SOCRATES: You talk nonsense, my good fellow. STREPSIADES: I will wager your tetrameter is the semisextarius. SOCRATES: Plague seize the dunce and the fool! Come, perchance you will learn the rhythms quicker. STREPSIADES: Will the rhythms supply me with food? SOCRATES: First they will help you to be pleasant in company, then to know what is meant by oenoplian rhythm and what by the dactylic. STREPSIADES: Of the dactyl? I know that quite well. SOCRATES: What is it then?
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τίς ἄλλος ἀντὶ τουτουὶ τοῦ δακτύλου;STREPSIADES: Why, 'tis this finger; formerly, when a child, I used this one. SOCRATES: You are as low-minded as you are stupid. STREPSIADES: But, wretched man, I do not want to learn all this. SOCRATES: Then what do you want to know? STREPSIADES: Not that, not that, but the art of false reasoning. SOCRATES: But you must first learn other things. Come, what are the male quadrupeds? STREPSIADES: Oh! I know the males thoroughly. Do you take me for a fool then? The ram, the buck, the bull, the dog, the pigeon. SOCRATES: Do you see what you are doing; is not the female pigeon called the same as the male? STREPSIADES: How else? Come now? SOCRATES: How else? With you then 'tis pigeon and pigeon!
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νὴ τὸν Ποσειδῶ. νῦν δὲ πῶς με χρὴ καλεῖν;STREPSIADES: 'Tis true, by Poseidon! but what names do you want me to give them? SOCRATES: Term the female pigeonnette and the male pigeon. STREPSIADES: Pigeonnette! hah! by the Air! That's splendid! for that lesson bring out your kneading-trough and I will fill him with flour to the brim. SOCRATES: There you are wrong again; you make trough masculine and it should be feminine. STREPSIADES: What? if I say him, do I make the trough masculine? SOCRATES: Assuredly! would you not say him for Cleonymus? STREPSIADES: Well? SOCRATES: Then trough is of the same gender as Cleonymus? STREPSIADES: Oh! good sir! Cleonymus never had a kneading-trough; he used a round mortar for the purpose. But come, tell me what I should say? SOCRATES: For trough you should say her as you would for Sostrate.
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τὴν καρδόπην, ὥσπερ καλεῖς τὴν Σωστράτην.STREPSIADES: Her? SOCRATES: In this manner you make it truly female. STREPSIADES: That's it! Her for trough and her for Cleonymus. SOCRATES: Now I must teach you to distinguish the masculine proper names from those that are feminine. STREPSIADES: Ah! I know the female names well. SOCRATES: Name some then. STREPSIADES: Lysilla, Philinna, Clitagora, Demetria. SOCRATES: And what are masculine names? STREPSIADES: They are countless — Philoxenus, Melesias, Amynias. SOCRATES: But, wretched man, the last two are not masculine. STREPSIADES: You do not reckon them masculine? SOCRATES: Not at all. If you met Amynias, how would you hail him? STREPSIADES: How? Why, I should shout, "Hi! hither, Amynia!" SOCRATES: Do you see? 'tis a female name that you give him. STREPSIADES: And is it not rightly done, since he refuses military service? But what use is there in learning what we all know? SOCRATES: You know nothing about it. Come, lie down there. STREPSIADES: What for? SOCRATES: Ponder awhile over matters that interest you. STREPSIADES: Oh! I pray you, not there! but, if I must lie down and ponder, let me lie on the ground. SOCRATES: 'Tis out of the question. Come! on to the couch!
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οὗτος τί ποιεῖς; οὐχὶ φροντίζεις; ἐγώ;STREPSIADES: Whether the bugs will not entirely devour me. SOCRATES: May death seize you, accursed man! STREPSIADES: Ah! it has already. SOCRATES: Come, no giving way! Cover up your head; the thing to do is to find an ingenious alternative. STREPSIADES: An alternative! ah! I only wish one would come to me from within these coverlets! SOCRATES: Hold! let us see what our fellow is doing. Ho! you! are you asleep? STREPSIADES: No, by Apollo! SOCRATES: Have you got hold of anything? STREPSIADES: No, nothing whatever. SOCRATES: Nothing at all! STREPSIADES: No, nothing but my tool, which I've got in my hand. SOCRATES: Are you not going to cover your head immediately and ponder? STREPSIADES: Over what? Come, Socrates, tell me. SOCRATES: Think first what you want, and then tell me. STREPSIADES: But I have told you a thousand times what I want. 'Tis not to pay any of my creditors. SOCRATES: Come, wrap yourself up; concentrate your mind, which wanders too lightly, study every detail, scheme and examine thoroughly. STREPSIADES: Oh, woe! woe! oh dear! oh dear! SOCRATES: Keep yourself quiet, and if any notion troubles you, put it quickly aside, then resume it and think over it again. STREPSIADES: My dear little Socrates! SOCRATES: What is it, old greybeard?
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ὦ Σωκρατίδιον φίλτατον. τί ὦ γέρον;STREPSIADES: I have a scheme for not paying my debts. SOCRATES: Let us hear it. STREPSIADES: Tell me, if I purchased a Thessalian witch, I could make the moon descend during the night and shut it, like a mirror, into a round box and there keep it carefully.... SOCRATES: How would you gain by that? STREPSIADES: How? Why, if the moon did not rise, I would have no interest to pay. SOCRATES: Why so? STREPSIADES: Because money is lent by the month. SOCRATES: Good! but I am going to propose another trick to you. If you were condemned to pay five talents, how would you manage to quash that verdict? Tell me. STREPSIADES: How? how? I don't know, I must think. SOCRATES: Do you always shut your thoughts within yourself. Let your ideas fly in the air, like a may-bug, tied by the foot with a thread. STREPSIADES: I have found a very clever way to annul that conviction; you will admit that much yourself. SOCRATES: What is it? STREPSIADES: Have you ever seen a beautiful, transparent stone at the druggists, with which you may kindle fire? SOCRATES: You mean a crystal lens. STREPSIADES: Yes. SOCRATES: Well, what then? STREPSIADES: If I placed myself with this stone in the sun and a long way off from the clerk, while he was writing out the conviction, I could make all the wax, upon which the words were written, melt. SOCRATES: Well thought out, by the Graces! STREPSIADES: Ah! I am delighted to have annulled the decree that was to cost me five talents. SOCRATES: Come, take up this next question quickly.
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ὅπως ἀποστρέψαι' ἂν ἀντιδικῶν δίκηνSTREPSIADES: Which? SOCRATES: If, when summoned to court, you were in danger of losing your case for want of witnesses, how would you make the conviction fall upon your opponent? STREPSIADES: 'Tis very simple and most easy. SOCRATES: Let me hear. STREPSIADES: This way. If another case had to be pleaded before mine was called, I should run and hang myself. SOCRATES: You talk rubbish! STREPSIADES: Not so, by the gods! if I was dead, no action could lie against me. SOCRATES: You are merely beating the air. Begone! I will give you no more lessons. STREPSIADES: Why not? Oh! Socrates! in the name of the gods! SOCRATES: But you forget as fast as you learn. Come, what was the thing I taught you first? Tell me.
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τίς ἦν ἐν ᾗ 'ματτόμεθα μέντοι τἄλφιτα;STREPSIADES: Ah! let me see. What was the first thing? What was it then? Ah! that thing in which we knead the bread, oh! my god! what do you call it? SOCRATES: Plague take the most forgetful and silliest of old addlepates! STREPSIADES: Alas! what a calamity! what will become of me? I am undone if I do not learn how to ply my tongue. Oh! Clouds! give me good advice. CHORUS: Old man, we counsel you, if you have brought up a son, to send him to learn in your stead. STREPSIADES: Undoubtedly I have a son, as well endowed as the best, but he is unwilling to learn. What will become of me? CHORUS: And you don't make him obey you? STREPSIADES: You see, he is big and strong; moreover, through his mother he is a descendant of those fine birds, the race of Coesyra. Nevertheless, I will go and find him, and if he refuses, I will turn him out of the house. Go in, Socrates, and wait for me awhile. CHORUS (to Socrates). Do you understand, that, thanks to us, you will be loaded with benefits? Here is a man, ready to obey you in all things. You see how he is carried away with admiration and enthusiasm. Profit by it to clip him as short as possible; fine chances are all too quickly gone. STREPSIADES: No, by the Clouds! you stay no longer here; go and devour the ruins of your uncle Megacles' fortune. PHIDIPPIDES: Oh! my poor father! what has happened to you? By the Olympian Zeus! you are no longer in your senses!
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 23, 237, 24-26, 280-283, 22 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

22. σέβω δὲ νύμφας, ἔνθα Κωρυκὶς πέτρα
2. Aristophanes, Knights, 1179-1180, 268, 1178 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1178. ἡ δ' ̓Οβριμοπάτρα γ' ἑφθὸν ἐκ ζωμοῦ κρέας
3. Aristophanes, Clouds, 224-509, 518-603, 605-803, 998-999, 223 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

223. πρῶτον μὲν ὅ τι δρᾷς ἀντιβολῶ κάτειπέ μοι.
4. Aristophanes, Peace, 143, 43-48, 835-840, 871-875, 889-895, 929-934, 976, 1275 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1275. ἀσπίδας; οὐ παύσει μεμνημένος ἀσπίδος ἡμῖν;
5. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1146 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1146. μὴ μνησικακήσῃς, εἰ σὺ Φυλὴν κατέλαβες.
6. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 102-129, 101 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

101. ἱερὰν χθονίαις δεξάμεναι
7. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1123-1164, 1122 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1122. οὔτοι ποτὲ ζῶν τοῦτον ἀποδυθήσομαι
8. Euripides, Bacchae, 10, 1170-1171, 1185-1187, 120-121, 1212-1215, 122-127, 1278, 128-134, 186-190, 2, 272-299, 3, 300-342, 395-399, 4, 400-402, 5-7, 787-799, 8, 800-846, 9, 90-93, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
9. Euripides, Ion, 551-553, 714-720, 550 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

550. Didst thou in days gone by come to the Pythian rock? Xuthu
10. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 1244, 1243 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 227-228, 226 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Rhesus, 973, 972 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

972. As under far Pangaion Orpheus lies
13. Sophocles, Antigone, 1116-1154, 1115 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.38.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.38.2. while the magnitude of our city draws the produce of the world into our harbor, so that to the Athenian the fruits of other countries are as familiar a luxury as those of his own.
15. Plutarch, On The E At Delphi, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

364e. from the nature of Osiris and the ceremony of finding him. That Osiris is identical with Dionysus who could more fittingly know than yourself, Clea? For you are at the head of the inspired maidens of Delphi, and have been consecrated by your father and mother in the holy rites of Osiris. If, however, for the benefit of others it is needful to adduce proofs of this identity, let us leave undisturbed what may not be told, but the public ceremonies which the priests perform in the burial of the Apis, when they convey his body on an improvised bier, do not in any way come short of a Bacchic procession; for they fasten skins of fawns about themselves, and carry Bacchic wand
17. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.6.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.6.4. Others maintain that Castalius, an aboriginal, had a daughter Thyia, who was the first to be priestess of Dionysus and celebrate orgies in honor of the god. It is said that later on men called after her Thyiads all women who rave in honor of Dionysus. At any rate they hold that Delphus was a son of Apollo and Thyia. Others say that his mother was Melaena, daughter of Cephisus.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegean sea, floating configuration of islands in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
aeschylus, aeschylean (dionysiac) tetralogies/plays Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
alkibiades Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
apollo, apollonian, apolline Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
apollo, dionysus, association with Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo, sacking of delphi predicted in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo, teiresias in bacchae as prophet of Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
apollo Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
apollo delios/dalios (delos) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
archegetes ἀρχηγέτης Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
aristophanes, clouds Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 99
aristophanes, frogs Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 99
aristophanes Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 120; Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
athena Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 120
athenian empire, and local identities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
athenian empire, as myth-ritual network Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
athenian empire, as theoric worshipping group Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
athenian empire, ionian policies Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
athenian empire Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
audience, theatre Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 99
bacchants, bacchae, bacchai Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
cadmus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
caryatids Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
catchment area, of cults, constant (re)forging of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
cave, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
cave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
choregia, and community building Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
chorus, khoros, athenian empire as Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
chorus, khoros, flexible metaphor Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
chorus, khoros, of islands Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
chorus (male, female), of e. bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
cleon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 99
column of the dancers Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
community, religious, not identical with political Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
concept, in old comedy Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
corycia, corycian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 92
dadaphorios month Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
defending greeks and democracies, and thalassocracy Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
delphi, delphian, delphic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
delphi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
dionysos, arrival Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dionysos, dionysos liknites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
dionysus, anthropomorphism of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
dionysus, hellenization of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
enthusiasm ἐνθουσιασμός, enthusiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
ethnic, stereotyping Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
eupolidean, metre Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 99
eupolis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 99
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
female Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
hades place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
homeric hymns, to dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
imperial Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
islands, in the aegean Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
night, nocturnal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
nikias (athenian general), peace of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
nikias (athenian general), theoria to delos Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
orpheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
papyrus-text Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
parnassus, parnassian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
parnassus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
patron, patronage Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture, Volume 2: Comedy, Herodotus, Hellenistic and Imperial Greek Poetry, the Novels (2023) 99
peace, and religious activity Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
peloponnesian war, athens and delian theoria in Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
philia (friendship) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
poets, creativity in social contexts Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
polis, cohesion/coherence of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
priestess Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
reconciliation/convergence, in eumenides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
reconciliation/convergence, of apollo and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 92
reconciliation/convergence, of dionysus and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 92
recontextualization Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
refiguration Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
rejuvenation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
resemblances, eumenides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
resemblances, lycurgeia Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
resemblances, neaniskoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 92
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
reworking Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
sanctuary Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
seaford, richard Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
semele Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
song-culture, forum for debate of contemporary issues Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
sophia, wisdom in bacchae Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 157
space, religious, malleable and constantly changing Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
teiresias Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 92
temple Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
thebes Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55
theomachos (–oi)/theomachia/theomachein Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
theoria, and local identities Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
theoria, as economic network Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
theoria, choral polis-theoria Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
theoria, inter-state relations Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
theoria, personified Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
theoria, sense of community Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
thrace Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 55, 92
thyiads, thyiades Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291
thyrsos (–oi) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 92
tribute, to athens, blurring of religious and monetary in choral dance Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
tribute, to athens, of real goods (economic) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 115
vases, attic' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 291