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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1206
Aristophanes, Clouds, 1468
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 112-137, 111 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

111. πέμπει σὺν δορὶ καὶ χερὶ πράκτορι 111. Despatched, with spear and executing hand
2. Aeschylus, Persians, 206-210, 205 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

205. ὁρῶ δὲ φεύγοντʼ αἰετὸν πρὸς ἐσχάραν 205. But I saw an eagle fleeing for safety to the altar of Phoebus—and out of terror, my friends, I stood speechless. Thereupon I caught sight of a falcon rushing at full speed with outstretched wings and with his talons plucking at the head of the eagle, which did nothing but cower and
3. Aristophanes, Birds, 619, 1527 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1527. ὅθεν ὁ πατρῷός ἐστιν ̓Εξηκεστίδῃ;
4. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1467, 1469-1471, 1473-1474, 1476-1480, 367-374, 408-411, 563-574, 818-831, 984, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1240. ἐμοῦ καταπροίξει. θαυμασίως ἥσθην θεοῖς
5. Aristophanes, Peace, 178-180, 182-194, 201-202, 177 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

177. ἀτὰρ ἐγγὺς εἶναι τῶν θεῶν ἐμοὶ δοκῶ
6. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 582-586, 87-92, 130 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

130. αὐτίκα γὰρ ἄρχει διὰ τίν' ὁ Ζεὺς τῶν θεῶν;
7. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 272 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

272. ὄμνυμι τοίνυν αἰθέρ' οἴκησιν Διός.
8. Herodotus, Histories, 5.66, 7.94, 8.44 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.66. Athens, which had been great before, now grew even greater when her tyrants had been removed. The two principal holders of power were Cleisthenes an Alcmaeonid, who was reputed to have bribed the Pythian priestess, and Isagoras son of Tisandrus, a man of a notable house but his lineage I cannot say. His kinsfolk, at any rate, sacrifice to Zeus of Caria. ,These men with their factions fell to contending for power, Cleisthenes was getting the worst of it in this dispute and took the commons into his party. Presently he divided the Athenians into ten tribes instead of four as formerly. He called none after the names of the sons of Ion—Geleon, Aegicores, Argades, and Hoples—but invented for them names taken from other heroes, all native to the country except Aias. Him he added despite the fact that he was a stranger because he was a neighbor and an ally. 7.94. The Ionians furnished a hundred ships; their equipment was like the Greek. These Ionians, as long as they were in the Peloponnese, dwelt in what is now called Achaia, and before Danaus and Xuthus came to the Peloponnese, as the Greeks say, they were called Aegialian Pelasgians. They were named Ionians after Ion the son of Xuthus. 8.44. These, then, were the Peloponnesians who took part in the war. From the mainland outside the Peloponnese came the following: the Athenians provided more than all the rest, one hundred and eighty ships. They provided these alone, since the Plataeans did not fight with the Athenians at Salamis for this reason: when the Hellenes departed from Artemisium and were off Chalcis, the Plataeans landed on the opposite shore of Boeotia and attended to the removal of their households. In bringing these to safety they were left behind. ,The Athenians, while the Pelasgians ruled what is now called Hellas, were Pelasgians, bearing the name of Cranai. When Cecrops was their king they were called Cecropidae, and when Erechtheus succeeded to the rule, they changed their name and became Athenians. When, however, Ion son of Xuthus was commander of the Athenian army, they were called after him Ionians.
9. Isaeus, Orations, 6.47 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Plato, Euthydemus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

302c. he said, and no Athenian at all, if you have neither ancestral gods, nor shrines, nor anything else that denotes a gentleman!
11. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1659 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 41.2 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

13. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.141, 43.51 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

14. Plautus, Amphitruo, 1054-1056, 1053 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

15. Strabo, Geography, 8.7.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.7.1. Achaea In antiquity this country was under the mastery of the Ionians, who were sprung from the Athenians; and in antiquity it was called Aegialeia, and the inhabitants Aegialeians, but later it was called Ionia after the Ionians, just as Attica also was called Ionia after Ion the son of Xuthus. They say that Hellen was the son of Deucalion, and that he was lord of the people between the Peneius and the Asopus in the region of Phthia and gave over his rule to the eldest of his sons, but that he sent the rest of them to different places outside, each to seek a settlement for himself. One of these sons, Dorus, united the Dorians about Parnassus into one state, and at his death left them named after himself; another, Xuthus, who had married the daughter of Erechtheus, founded the Tetrapolis of Attica, consisting of Oinoe, Marathon, Probalinthus, and Tricorynthus. One of the sons of Xuthus, Achaeus, who had committed involuntary manslaughter, fled to Lacedemon and brought it about that the people there were called Achaeans; and Ion conquered the Thracians under Eumolpus, and thereby gained such high repute that the Athenians turned over their government to him. At first Ion divided the people into four tribes, but later into four occupations: four he designated as farmers, others as artisans, others as sacred officers, and a fourth group as the guards. And he made several regulations of this kind, and at his death left his own name to the country. But the country had then come to be so populous that the Athenians even sent forth a colony of Ionians to the Peloponnesus, and caused the country which they occupied to be called Ionia after themselves instead of Aegialus; and the men were divided into twelve cities and called Ionians instead of Aegialeians. But after the return of the Heracleidae they were driven out by the Achaeans and went back again to Athens; and from there they sent forth with the Codridae the Ionian colony to Asia, and these founded twelve cities on the seaboard of Caria and Lydia, thus dividing themselves into the same number of parts as the cities they had occupied in the Peloponnesus. Now the Achaeans were Phthiotae in race, but they lived in Lacedemon; and when the Heracleidae prevailed, the Achaeans were won over by Tisamenus, the son of Orestes, as I have said before, attacked the Ionians, and proving themselves more powerful than the Ionians drove them out and took possession of the land themselves; and they kept the division of the country the same as it was when they received it. And they were so powerful that, although the Heracleidae, from whom they had revolted, held the rest of the Peloponnesus, still they held out against one and all, and named the country Achaea. Now from Tisamenus to Ogyges they continued under the rule of kings; then, under a democratic government, they became so famous for their constitutions that the Italiotes, after the uprising against the Pythagoreians, actually borrowed most of their usages from the Achaeans. And after the battle at Leuctra the Thebans turned over to them the arbitration of the disputes which the cities had with one another; and later, when their league was dissolved by the Macedonians, they gradually recovered themselves. When Pyrrhus made his expedition to Italy, four cities came together and began a new league, among which were Patrae and Dyme; and then they began to add some of the twelve cities, except Olenus and Helice, the former having refused to join and the latter having been wiped out by a wave from the sea.
16. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.28.4, 7.1.2, 7.1.4-7.1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.28.4. On descending, not to the lower city, but to just beneath the Gateway, you see a fountain and near it a sanctuary of Apollo in a cave. It is here that Apollo is believed to have met Creusa, daughter of Erechtheus.... when the Persians had landed in Attica Philippides was sent to carry the tidings to Lacedaemon . On his return he said that the Lacedacmonians had postponed their departure, because it was their custom not to go out to fight before the moon was full. Philippides went on to say that near Mount Parthenius he had been met by Pan, who told him that he was friendly to the Athenians and would come to Marathon to fight for them. This deity, then, has been honored for this announcement. 7.1.2. Later on, after the death of Hellen, Xuthus was expelled from Thessaly by the rest of the sons of Hellen, who charged him with having appropriated some of the ancestral property. But he fled to Athens, where he was deemed worthy to wed the daughter of Erechtheus, by whom he had sons, Achaeus and Ion. On the death of Erechtheus Xuthus was appointed judge to decide which of his sons should succeed him. He decided that Cecrops, the eldest of them, should be king, and was accordingly banished from the land by the rest of the sons of Erechtheus. 7.1.4. It so happened that the proposal found favour with Ion, and on the death of Selinus he became king of the Aegialians. He called the city he founded in Aegialus Helice after his wife, and called the inhabitants Ionians after himself. This, however, was not a change of name, but an addition to it, for the folk were named Aegialian Ionians. The original name clung to the land even longer than to the people; for at any rate in the list of the allies of Agamemnon, Homer Hom. Il. 2.575 is content to mention the ancient name of the land: Throughout all Aegialus and about wide Helice. Hom. Il. 2.575 7.1.5. At that time in the reign of Ion the Eleusinians made war on the Athenians, and these having invited Ion to be their leader in the war, he met his death in Attica, his tomb being in the deme of Potamus. The descendants of Ion became rulers of the Ionians, until they themselves as well as the people were expelled by the Achaeans. The Achaeans at that time had themselves been expelled from Lacedaemon and Argos by the Dorians.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adoption motives for Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
agamemnon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
amphitryo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
apollo, cults of, patroos Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
apollo Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
apollodorus, and daedalus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
atheism Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 556
athena, titles of phratria Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
belief, believe, lack of Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 556
bird, omen Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
chorus, in drama Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
clouds (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
cocalus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
constitution of athens (aristotle) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
daedalus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
diasia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
dipolieia (festival) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
dramaturgy Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
eagle Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
epiphany, passim – meaning, exclusive, epilogue epiphany Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
festival Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
fragments, of sophocles works Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
helios Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
ion (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
ion (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
jupiter Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
kamikoi (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
libya Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
meidias painter Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
men of camicus, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
menelaus Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
minos Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
new gods, construction of Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 111
olympic games Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
oracle (divine message) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
pausanias, and ion Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
persians Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
pheidippides Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
plays, lost Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
poseidon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
prayer Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
robert, louis Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 556
sacrifice Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
sign Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
socrates Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
solon Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 556
sophocles, lost plays and fragments of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
strepsiades Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
thales Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 111
thasos, ancestral gods on Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
thunderbolt Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
wealth (personification) Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi patroos Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
wool, worked for athena by parthenoi phratrios' Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
zenobius, and daedalus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 573
zeus, ammon Lipka, Epiphanies and Dreams in Greek Polytheism: Textual Genres and 'Reality' from Homer to Heliodorus (2021) 123
zeus, hetaireios Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 111
zeus, titles of patroos Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
zeus, titles of phratrios Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 22
zeus and hermes Versnel, Coping with the Gods: Wayward Readings in Greek Theology (2011) 111