Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1200
Aristophanes, Birds, 954-955
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.443-1.447, 1.452, 1.458-1.466, 1.474, 2.404-2.407, 2.412-2.431 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.443. /and place in the arms of her dear father, saying to him:Chryses, Agamemnon, king of men, sent me forth to bring to you your daughter, and to offer to Phoebus a holy hecatomb on the Danaans' behalf, that therewith we may propitiate the lord, who has now brought upon the Argives woeful lamentation. 1.444. /and place in the arms of her dear father, saying to him:Chryses, Agamemnon, king of men, sent me forth to bring to you your daughter, and to offer to Phoebus a holy hecatomb on the Danaans' behalf, that therewith we may propitiate the lord, who has now brought upon the Argives woeful lamentation. 1.445. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.446. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.447. /So saying he placed her in his arms, and he joyfully took his dear child; but they made haste to set in array for the god the holy hecatomb around the well-built altar, and then they washed their hands and took up the barley grains. Then Chryses lifted up his hands, and prayed aloud for them: 1.452. / Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stands over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rules mightily over Tenedos. As before you heard me when I prayed—to me you did honour, and mightily smote the host of the Achaeans—even so now fulfill me this my desire: 1.458. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. 1.459. /ward off now from the Danaans the loathly pestilence. So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Then, when they had prayed, and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads, and cut their throats, and flayed them, and cut out the thighs and covered them 1.460. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.461. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.462. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.463. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.464. /with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. And the old man burned them on stakes of wood, and made libation over them of gleaming wine; and beside him the young men held in their hands the five-pronged forks. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned, and they had tasted the entrails, they cut up the rest and spitted it 1.465. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.466. /and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack anything of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire for food and drink, the youths filled the bowls brim full of drink 1.474. /and served out to all, first pouring drops for libation into the cups. So the whole day long they sought to appease the god with song, singing the beautiful paean, the sons of the Achaeans, hymning the god who works from afar; and his heart was glad, as he heard.But when the sun set and darkness came on 2.404. /And they made sacrifice one to one of the gods that are for ever, and one to another, with the prayer that they might escape from death and the toil of war. But Agamemnon, king of men, slew a fat bull of five years to the son of Cronos, supreme in might, and let call the elders, the chieftains of the Achaean host 2.405. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.406. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.407. /Nestor, first of all, and king Idomeneus, and thereafter the twain Aiantes and the son of Tydeus, and as the sixth Odysseus, the peer of Zeus in counsel. And unbidden came to him Menelaus, good at the war-cry, for he knew in his heart wherewith his brother was busied. 2.412. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.413. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.414. /About the bull they stood and took up the barley grains, and in prayer lord Agamemnon spake among them, saying.Zeus, most glorious, most great, lord of the dark clouds, that dwellest in the heaven, grant that the sun set not, neither darkness come upon us, until I have cast down in headlong ruin the hall of Priam, blackened with smoke 2.415. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.416. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.417. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.418. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. 2.419. /and have burned with consuming fire the portals thereof, and cloven about the breast of Hector his tunic, rent with the bronze; and in throngs may his comrades round about him fall headlong in the dust, and bite the earth. So spake he; but not as yet would the son of Cronos grant him fulfillment; 2.420. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.421. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.422. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.423. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.424. /nay, he accepted the sacrifice, but toil he made to wax unceasingly. Then, when they had prayed and had sprinkled the barley grains, they first drew back the victims' heads and cut their throats, and flayed them; and they cut out the thigh-pieces and covered them with a double layer of fat, and laid raw flesh thereon. 2.425. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.426. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.427. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.428. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.429. /These they burned on billets of wood stripped of leaves, and the inner parts they pierced with spits, and held them over the flame of Hephaestus. But when the thigh-pieces were wholly burned and they had tasted of the inner parts, they cut up the rest and spitted it, and roasted it carefully, and drew all off the spits. 2.430. /Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 2.431. /Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.430-3.463, 3.472 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 730 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

730. ἐπόθουν τυ ναὶ τὸν φίλιον ᾇπερ ματέρα.
4. Aristophanes, Birds, 1022-1055, 1210, 1216, 1220, 1224, 1231-1233, 1236-1237, 1240, 1243-1245, 1375-1376, 848-903, 955, 958-991, 1021 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1021. ποῦ πρόξενοι; τίς ὁ Σαρδανάπαλλος οὑτοσί;
5. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 194, 206-208, 193 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

193. ποῖ λευκὸν ἵππον; ἀλλὰ πῶς ὀμούμεθα
6. Aristophanes, Peace, 1019, 1043-1126, 960, 962-963, 976, 978-987, 1005 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1005. καὶ Κωπᾴδων ἐλθεῖν σπυρίδας
7. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 73, 86, 72 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

72. νὴ τοὺς θεοὺς ἐγὼ πυθέσθαι βούλομαι
8. Euripides, Electra, 823 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

823. λευκὰς ἐγύμνου σάρκας ἐκτείνων χέρα:
9. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1578-1583, 1577 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Isaeus, Orations, 2.31-2.32, 12.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17c. as theirs are, nor carefully arranged, but you will hear things said at random with the words that happen to occur to me. For I trust that what I say is just; and let none of you expect anything else. For surely it would not be fitting for one of my age to come before you like a youngster making up speeches. And, men of Athens, I urgently beg and beseech you if you hear me making my defence with the same words with which I have been accustomed to speak both in the market place at the bankers tables, where many of you have heard me, and elsewhere
12. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

757c. it produces all things good; for it dispenses more to the greater and less to the smaller, giving due measure to each according to nature; and with regard to honors also, by granting the greater to those that are greater in goodness, and the less to those of the opposite character in respect of goodness and education, it assigns in proportion what is fitting to each. Indeed, it is precisely this which constitutes for us political justice, which is the object we must strive for, Clinias; this equality is what we must aim at, now that we are settling the State
13. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 522-523, 521 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Aristotle, Athenian Constitution, 7.1, 55.5 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

15. Menander, Dyscolus, 405, 407-418, 432, 404 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16. Lucian, Sacrifices, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acropolis, as ritual location for oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
aglaurus as oath witness, agora (athenian), oaths taken in Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
alopeke deme, athens, altars, swearing at Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
anger/fury/ire/orge/rage/wrath Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
aphrodite Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
apollo, temple at delphi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
arbitrators oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
archons oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
athena Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
athens, agora, oaths in Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
athens, oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
athletes oaths, athlothetai, oaths of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
atlantis Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
battery Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
beating Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
burkert, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
cephale, altar of aphrodite Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
chase Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
cinesias Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
cloudcuckooland/nephelokokkugia Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
comedy, informal oaths in Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
delphi, temple of apollo Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
demeter, temples Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
detienne, m. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
dike aikeias Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
dionysus, dionysiac (rites, farce etc.) Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
euphiletus (isaeus) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
gestures accompanying oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
hierocles Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
honor Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
informal oaths, in comedy Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
insult, cf. offense Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
iris Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
law-courts, witnesses oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
magnesia (platonic) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
marathon, temple at Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
meton Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
nestor Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
official oaths, archons oath of office Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
official oaths, in agora Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
official oaths, on acropolis Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
peisetaerus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
perjury, in magnesia Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
philocles Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
poseidon, temple of (atlantis) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
priest Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
pylos Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
robertson smith, w. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
slave Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
sophistic Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
statues, proximity to during oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
temples, as location for oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
theano Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
thesaurus cultus et rituum antiquorum Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
trojans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
troy Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
trygaeus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
vernant, j.-p.' Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 15
whip, cf. flogging, scourging Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
witness Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297
witnesses oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 137
zeus Riess, Performing interpersonal violence: court, curse, and comedy in fourth-century BCE Athens (2012) 297