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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1199
Aristophanes, Acharnians, 394-484
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ἐκκάλεσον αὐτόν. ἀλλ' ἀδύνατον. ἀλλ' ὅμως:DICAEOPOLIS: So much the worse. But I will not go. Come, let us knock at the door. Euripides, my little Euripides, my darling Euripides, listen; never had man greater right to your pity. It is Dicaeopolis of the Chollidan Deme who calls you. Do you hear? EURIPIDES: I have no time to waste. DICAEOPOLIS: Very well, have yourself wheeled out here. EURIPIDES: Impossible. DICAEOPOLIS: Nevertheless.... EURIPIDES: Well, let them roll me out; as to coming down, I have not the time. DICAEOPOLIS: Euripides.... EURIPIDES: What words strike my ear? DICAEOPOLIS: You perch aloft to compose tragedies, when you might just as well do them on the ground. I am not astonished at your introducing cripples on the stage. And why dress in these miserable tragic rags? I do not wonder that your heroes are beggars. But, Euripides, on my knees I beseech you, give me the tatters of some old piece. for I have to treat the Chorus to a long speech, and if I do it ill it is all over with me. EURIPIDES: What rags do you prefer? Those in which I rigged out Oeneus on the stage, that unhappy, miserable old man?
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οὐκ Οἰνέως ἦν, ἀλλ' ἔτ' ἀθλιωτέρου.DICAEOPOLIS: No, I want those of some hero still more unfortunate. EURIPIDES: Of Phoenix, the blind man? DICAEOPOLIS: No, not of Phoenix, you have another hero more unfortunate than him. EURIPIDES: Now, what tatters does he want? Do you mean those of the beggar Philoctetes? DICAEOPOLIS: No, of another far more the mendicant. EURIPIDES: Is it the filthy dress of the lame fellow, Bellerophon? DICAEOPOLIS: No, 'tis not Bellerophon; he, whom I mean, was not only lame and a beggar, but boastful and a fine speaker. EURIPIDES: Ah! I know, it is Telephus, the Mysian. DICAEOPOLIS: Yes, Telephus. Give me his rags, I beg of you. EURIPIDES: Slave! give him Telephus' tatters; they are on top of the rags of Thyestes and mixed with those of Ino.
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μεταξὺ τῶν ̓Ινοῦς. ἰδοὺ ταυτὶ λαβέ.SLAVE: Catch hold! here they are. DICAEOPOLIS: Oh! Zeus, whose eye pierces everywhere and embraces all, permit me to assume the most wretched dress on earth. Euripides, cap your kindness by giving me the little Mysian hat, that goes so well with these tatters. I must today have the look of a beggar; "be what I am, but not appear to be"; the audience will know well who I am, but the Chorus will be fools enough not to, and I shall dupe 'em with my subtle phrases. EURIPIDES: I will give you the hat; I love the clever tricks of an ingenious brain like yours. DICAEOPOLIS: Rest happy, and may it befall Telephus as I wish. Ah! I already feel myself filled with quibbles. But I must have a beggar's staff. EURIPIDES: Here you are, and now get you gone from this porch. DICAEOPOLIS: Oh, my soul! You see how you are driven from this house, when I still need so many accessories. But let us be pressing, obstinate, importunate. Euripides, give me a little basket with a lamp alight inside. EURIPIDES: Whatever do you want such a thing as that for? DICAEOPOLIS: I do not need it, but I want it all the same. EURIPIDES: You importune me; get you gone! DICAEOPOLIS: Alas! may the gods grant you a destiny as brilliant as your mother's.
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φεῦ:EURIPIDES: Leave me in peace. DICAEOPOLIS: Oh! just a little broken cup. EURIPIDES: Take it and go and hang yourself. What a tiresome fellow! DICAEOPOLIS: Ah! you do not know all the pain you cause me. Dear, good Euripides, nothing beyond a small pipkin stoppered with a sponge. EURIPIDES: Miserable man! You are robbing me of an entire tragedy. Here, take it and be off. DICAEOPOLIS: I am going, but, great gods! I need one thing more; unless I have it, I am a dead man. Hearken, my little Euripides, only give me this and I go, never to return. For pity's sake, do give me a few small herbs for my basket. EURIPIDES: You wish to ruin me then. Here, take what you want; but it is all over with my pieces! DICAEOPOLIS: I won't ask another thing; I'm going. I am too importunate and forget that I rouse against me the hate of kings. — Ah! wretch that I am! I am lost! I have forgotten one thing, without which all the rest is as nothing. Euripides, my excellent Euripides, my dear little Euripides, may I die if I ask you again for the smallest present; only one, the last, absolutely the last; give me some of the chervil your mother left you in her will. EURIPIDES: Insolent hound! Slave, lock the door. DICAEOPOLIS: Oh, my soul! I must go away without the chervil. Art thou sensible of the dangerous battle we are about to engage upon in defending the Lacedemonians? Courage, my soul, we must plunge into the midst of it.
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ἕστηκας; οὐκ εἶ καταπιὼν Εὐριπίδην;Dost thou hesitate and art thou fully steeped in Euripides? That's right! do not falter, my poor heart, and let us risk our head to say what we hold for truth. Courage and boldly to the front. I wonder I am so brave! CHORUS: What do you purport doing? what are you going to say? What an impudent fellow! what a brazen heart! To dare to stake his head and uphold an opinion contrary to that of us all! And he does not tremble to face this peril! Come, it is you who desired it, speak!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 109 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 109 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Hermes, 116-129, 115 (8th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

115. He heaped a pile of wood and started out
4. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 204-368, 370-386, 391, 393, 395-489, 496-556, 560-562, 564, 566-574, 582, 593-625, 8, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. ὅτε δὴ 'κεχήνη προσδοκῶν τὸν Αἰσχύλον
5. Aristophanes, Birds, 276, 275 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

275. νὴ Δί' ἕτερος δῆτα χοὖτος ἔξεδρον χρόαν ἔχων.
6. Aristophanes, Knights, 1249-1252, 520, 526, 537, 1248 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1248. οἴμοι πέπρακται τοῦ θεοῦ τὸ θέσφατον.
7. Aristophanes, Clouds, 553 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

553. Εὔπολις μὲν τὸν Μαρικᾶν πρώτιστον παρείλκυσεν
8. Aristophanes, Peace, 1013-1014, 147, 154-161, 192, 423-425, 431-432, 531-534, 603-604, 700, 722, 802-803, 1009 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1009. τένθαις πολλοῖς: κᾆτα Μελάνθιον
9. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1158, 1151 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1151. πατρὶς γάρ ἐστι πᾶς' ἵν' ἂν πράττῃ τις εὖ.
10. Aristophanes, Frogs, 101-102, 1299, 13-14, 1471, 357, 73, 76, 79, 83, 834, 86, 100 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

100. αἰθέρα Διὸς δωμάτιον, ἢ χρόνου πόδα
11. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 1011-1071, 1107-1108, 134-145, 194, 29-30, 466, 468, 502-519, 528-530, 533, 535, 538, 543-549, 558, 574-687, 689-761, 769-784, 850, 855-916, 921-922, 927, 1010 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1010. ἁνὴρ ἔοικεν οὐ προδώσειν, ἀλλά μοι
12. Aristophanes, Wasps, 61, 1414 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1414. ̓Ινοῖ κρεμαμένῃ πρὸς ποδῶν Εὐριπίδου.
13. Eupolis, Fragments, 392 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Eupolis, Fragments, 392 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Gregory of Nazianzus, Orations, 1 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acharnians, peace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
acharnians, wealth Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
acharnians, women at the thesmophoria MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
acharnians MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
achilles MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
agora MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
alexandria, library of Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
alexandria Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
allusion MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
amphitryon Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
apologia MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
archilochus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
aristophanes MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
audience, gregorys MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
basil of caesarea MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
callicles (character in platos gorgias) MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
chaerephon (character in platos gorgias) MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
christian, leadership MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
cratinus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
dialogue MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
elm, susanna MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
eumenes, king of pergamum Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
eupolis Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
euripides, telephus MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
euripides MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72; Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
frogs Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
gregory of nazianus, audience MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
gregory of nazianus, or. '2 apologetikos" MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
herakles/heracles/hercules Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
herdsman, and sacrifice' Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
hermes, in aristophanes Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
homer Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
mercury/hermes, as god of comedy Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
mercury/hermes, as slave Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
mercury/hermes, in plautus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
myth MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
oracle MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
parody MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
pergamum Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
plato, dialogues MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
plato, gorgias MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
plautus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
prometheus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 113
scholars/scholarship, ancient and byzantine (on tragedy), aristophanes of byzantium Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
scholars/scholarship, ancient and byzantine (on tragedy), crates of mallus Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
scholars/scholarship, ancient and byzantine (on tragedy), grammatiko/grammatikoi Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
scholars/scholarship, ancient and byzantine (on tragedy), philologoi Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
scholars/scholarship, ancient and byzantine (on tragedy), scholia Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
scholars/scholarship, ancient and byzantine (on tragedy) Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 340
socrates MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
telephus MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
telephus (euripides) MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
theoria MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
thesmophoria MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
vita activa MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72
vita contemplativa MacDougall, Philosophy at the Festival: The Festal Orations of Gregory of Nazianzus and the Classical Tradition (2022) 72