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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1199
Aristophanes, Acharnians, 148
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.341, 2.431, 3.3, 3.281-3.287, 3.292-3.293, 3.295, 4.195 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.341. /Nay, into the fire let us cast all counsels and plans of warriors, the drink-offerings of unmixed wine, and the hand-clasps wherein we put our trust. For vainly do we wrangle with words, nor can we find any device at all, for all our long-tarrying here. Son of Atreus, do thou as of old keep unbending purpose 2.431. /Then, when they had ceased from their labour and had made ready the meal, they feasted, nor did their hearts lack aught of the equal feast. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, among them the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia, was first to speak, saying:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 3.3. /Now when they were marshalled, the several companies with their captains, the Trojans came on with clamour and with a cry like birds, even as the clamour of cranes ariseth before the face of heaven, when they flee from wintry storms and measureless rain 3.281. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.282. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.283. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.284. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.285. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.286. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.287. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.292. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.293. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.295. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 4.195. /to see warlike Menelaus, son of Atreus, whom some man well skilled in archery hath smitten with an arrow, some Trojan or Lycian, compassing glory for himself but for us sorrow. So spake he, and the herald failed not to hearken, as he heard, but went his way throughout the host of the brazen-coated Achaeans
2. Homer, Odyssey, 14.434-14.436 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 7.42-7.43 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 101-147, 149-172, 225-233, 246-249, 44, 46-50, 509, 51, 510-512, 52-59, 595-599, 60, 600-609, 61, 610-619, 62-100 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

100. ἰαρταμὰν ἐξάρξαν ἀπισσόνα σάτρα.
5. Aristophanes, Knights, 1391, 802-809, 1389 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1389. σπονδὰς παραδῶ σοι. δεῦρ' ἴθ' αἱ Σπονδαὶ ταχύ.
6. Aristophanes, Clouds, 274 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

274. ὑπακούσατε δεξάμεναι θυσίαν καὶ τοῖς ἱεροῖσι χαρεῖσαι.
7. Aristophanes, Peace, 1013-1014, 1023-1126, 1172-1178, 1186, 1229, 1253, 1264, 1275, 1290, 433, 628-648, 976, 1009 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1009. τένθαις πολλοῖς: κᾆτα Μελάνθιον
8. Aristophanes, The Rich Man, 1137-1138, 677-678, 820, 1136 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1136. εἴ μοι πορίσας ἄρτον τιν' εὖ πεπεμμένον
9. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1047, 672-695, 1046 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1046. καίτοι σπένδων πόλλ' ἐπὶ πολλοῖς ὄμνυσιν τὸν Διόνυσον
10. Euripides, Andromache, 1101-1117, 1100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1100. ἡμεῖς δὲ μῆλα, φυλλάδος Παρνασίας
11. Euripides, Electra, 714-726, 785-814, 713 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

713. θυμέλαι δ' ἐπίτναντο χρυ- 713. The altars of beaten gold were set out; and through the town the
12. Euripides, Helen, 1576 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1576. βοῆς κελευστοῦ φθέγμαθ' ὡς ἠκούσαμεν.
13. Euripides, Hercules Furens, 923-930, 922 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

922. Victims to purify the house were stationed before the altar of Zeus, for Heracles had slain and cast from his halls the king of the land.
14. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1241, 1240 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1240. On these terms the armies made a truce, and in the space between them the generals took an oath to abide by.
15. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.71.6, 2.21, 2.64.3, 3.58.5, 7.77.4 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.71.6. But if you will only act, we will stand by you; it would be unnatural for us to change, and never should we meet with such a congenial ally. 2.64.3. Remember, too, that if your country has the greatest name in all the world, it is because she never bent before disaster; because she has expended more life and effort in war than any other city, and has won for herself a power greater than any hitherto known, the memory of which will descend to the latest posterity; even if now, in obedience to the general law of decay, we should ever be forced to yield, still it will be remembered that we held rule over more Hellenes than any other Hellenic state, that we sustained the greatest wars against their united or separate powers, and inhabited a city unrivalled by any other in resources or magnitude. 3.58.5. Pausanias buried them thinking that he was laying them in friendly ground and among men as friendly; but you, if you kill us and make the Plataean territory Theban, will leave your fathers and kinsmen in a hostile soil and among their murderers, deprived of the honors which they now enjoy. What is more, you will enslave the land in which the freedom of the Hellenes was won, make desolate the temples of the gods to whom they prayed before they overcame the Medes, and take away your ancestral sacrifices from those who founded and instituted them. 7.77.4. Others before us have attacked their neighbors and have done what men will do without suffering more than they could bear; and we may now justly expect to find the gods more kind, for we have become fitter objects for their pity than their jealousy. And then look at yourselves, mark the numbers and efficiency of the heavy infantry marching in your ranks, and do not give way too much to despondency, but reflect that you are yourselves at once a city wherever you sit down, and that there is no other in Sicily that could easily resist your attack, or expel you when once established.
16. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 4.6.8-4.6.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.6.8. Thus he spoke; and Cyrus answered: Well, Cyrus and Gobryas make a compact Gobryas, if you prove that you really mean all that you say to us, I not only receive you as a suppliant, but promise you with the help of the gods to avenge the murder of your son. But tell me, said he, if we do this for you and let you keep your castle and your province and the power which you had before, what service will you do us in return for that? 4.6.9. The castle, he answered, I will give you for your quarters when you come; the tribute of the province, which before I used to pay to him, I will pay to you; and whithersoever you march I will march with you at the head of the forces of my province. Besides, said he, I have a daughter, a maiden well-beloved and already ripe for marriage. I used once to think that I was rearing her to be the bride of the present king. But now my daughter herself has besought me with many tears not to give her to her brother’s murderer; and I am so resolved myself. And now I leave it to you to deal with her as I shall prove to deal with you. 4.6.10. According as what you have said is true, Cyrus then made answer, I give you my right hand and take yours. The gods be our witnesses. When this was done he bade Gobryas go and keep his arms; he also asked him how far it was to his place, for he meant to go there. And he said: If you start to-morrow early in the morning, you would spend the night of the second day with us.
17. Menander, Dyscolus, 494 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accusation Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
aegisthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
alliance with thebes (phoenician, women) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
alliances between states Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
aristophanes Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
assyrian oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
athenian dēmos Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
atreus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
authorial voice, swears oath Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
bribery Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
burial, tombs of ancestors Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 221
comedy, imitation of politics Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 221
conflict Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
cyrus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
delivery, hatred Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
demagogues Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
demosthenes Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
ecclesia Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 221
emphasis in oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
eteocles (phoenician women) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
euripides Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
gobryas (assyrian) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
group Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
hatred (misos) Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
hyrcanian oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
menelaus, and paris Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
neoptolemus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78
paris Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
pericles Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 221; Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
perjury, contemplation of, punished Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
polyneices Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
popular beliefs, in speeches Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 221
resentment Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
sacrifices, public' Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 221
sitalces (thracian king) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
spondai (libations) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
theatre Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
thebes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
thracian oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
thucydides Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
trojan war, oaths during Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
trojan war Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
truce oaths, in euripides Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
war Michalopoulos et al., The Rhetoric of Unity and Division in Ancient Literature (2021) 192
wine and oaths, as analogy for blood Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 147
xuthus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 78