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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



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Archilochus, Fragments, 94-95
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13 results
1. Archilochus, Fragments, 108-109, 48, 91, 95, 105 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Archilochus, Fragments, 108-109, 48, 91, 94-95, 105 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homer, Odyssey, 8.488-8.491 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Mimnermus of Colophon, Fragments, None (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

5. Tyrtaeus, Fragments, 4-5, 2 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

6. Simonides, Fragments, 3, 11 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Simonides, Fragments, 3, 11 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Herodotus, Histories, 1.1-1.5, 3.80, 6.105 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.1. The Persian learned men say that the Phoenicians were the cause of the dispute. These (they say) came to our seas from the sea which is called Red, and having settled in the country which they still occupy, at once began to make long voyages. Among other places to which they carried Egyptian and Assyrian merchandise, they came to Argos, ,which was at that time preeminent in every way among the people of what is now called Hellas . The Phoenicians came to Argos, and set out their cargo. ,On the fifth or sixth day after their arrival, when their wares were almost all sold, many women came to the shore and among them especially the daughter of the king, whose name was Io (according to Persians and Greeks alike), the daughter of Inachus. ,As these stood about the stern of the ship bargaining for the wares they liked, the Phoenicians incited one another to set upon them. Most of the women escaped: Io and others were seized and thrown into the ship, which then sailed away for Egypt . 1.2. In this way, the Persians say (and not as the Greeks), was how Io came to Egypt, and this, according to them, was the first wrong that was done. Next, according to their story, some Greeks (they cannot say who) landed at Tyre in Phoenicia and carried off the king's daughter Europa. These Greeks must, I suppose, have been Cretans. So far, then, the account between them was balanced. But after this (they say), it was the Greeks who were guilty of the second wrong. ,They sailed in a long ship to Aea, a city of the Colchians, and to the river Phasis : and when they had done the business for which they came, they carried off the king's daughter Medea. ,When the Colchian king sent a herald to demand reparation for the robbery and restitution of his daughter, the Greeks replied that, as they had been refused reparation for the abduction of the Argive Io, they would not make any to the Colchians. 1.3. Then (they say), in the second generation after this, Alexandrus, son of Priam, who had heard this tale, decided to get himself a wife from Hellas by capture; for he was confident that he would not suffer punishment. ,So he carried off Helen. The Greeks first resolved to send messengers demanding that Helen be restored and atonement made for the seizure; but when this proposal was made, the Trojans pleaded the seizure of Medea, and reminded the Greeks that they asked reparation from others, yet made none themselves, nor gave up the booty when asked. 1.4. So far it was a matter of mere seizure on both sides. But after this (the Persians say), the Greeks were very much to blame; for they invaded Asia before the Persians attacked Europe . ,“We think,” they say, “that it is unjust to carry women off. But to be anxious to avenge rape is foolish: wise men take no notice of such things. For plainly the women would never have been carried away, had they not wanted it themselves. ,We of Asia did not deign to notice the seizure of our women; but the Greeks, for the sake of a Lacedaemonian woman, recruited a great armada, came to Asia, and destroyed the power of Priam. ,Ever since then we have regarded Greeks as our enemies.” For the Persians claim Asia for their own, and the foreign peoples that inhabit it; Europe and the Greek people they consider to be separate from them. 1.5. Such is the Persian account; in their opinion, it was the taking of Troy which began their hatred of the Greeks. ,But the Phoenicians do not tell the same story about Io as the Persians. They say that they did not carry her off to Egypt by force. She had intercourse in Argos with the captain of the ship. Then, finding herself pregt, she was ashamed to have her parents know it, and so, lest they discover her condition, she sailed away with the Phoenicians of her own accord. ,These are the stories of the Persians and the Phoenicians. For my part, I shall not say that this or that story is true, but I shall identify the one who I myself know did the Greeks unjust deeds, and thus proceed with my history, and speak of small and great cities of men alike. ,For many states that were once great have now become small; and those that were great in my time were small before. Knowing therefore that human prosperity never continues in the same place, I shall mention both alike. 3.80. After the tumult quieted down, and five days passed, the rebels against the Magi held a council on the whole state of affairs, at which sentiments were uttered which to some Greeks seem incredible, but there is no doubt that they were spoken. ,Otanes was for turning the government over to the Persian people: “It seems to me,” he said, “that there can no longer be a single sovereign over us, for that is not pleasant or good. You saw the insolence of Cambyses, how far it went, and you had your share of the insolence of the Magus. ,How can monarchy be a fit thing, when the ruler can do what he wants with impunity? Give this power to the best man on earth, and it would stir him to unaccustomed thoughts. Insolence is created in him by the good things to hand, while from birth envy is rooted in man. ,Acquiring the two he possesses complete evil; for being satiated he does many reckless things, some from insolence, some from envy. And yet an absolute ruler ought to be free of envy, having all good things; but he becomes the opposite of this towards his citizens; he envies the best who thrive and live, and is pleased by the worst of his fellows; and he is the best confidant of slander. ,of all men he is the most inconsistent; for if you admire him modestly he is angry that you do not give him excessive attention, but if one gives him excessive attention he is angry because one is a flatter. But I have yet worse to say of him than that; he upsets the ancestral ways and rapes women and kills indiscriminately. ,But the rule of the multitude has in the first place the loveliest name of all, equality, and does in the second place none of the things that a monarch does. It determines offices by lot, and holds power accountable, and conducts all deliberating publicly. Therefore I give my opinion that we make an end of monarchy and exalt the multitude, for all things are possible for the majority.” 6.105. While still in the city, the generals first sent to Sparta the herald Philippides, an Athenian and a long-distance runner who made that his calling. As Philippides himself said when he brought the message to the Athenians, when he was in the Parthenian mountain above Tegea he encountered Pan. ,Pan called out Philippides' name and bade him ask the Athenians why they paid him no attention, though he was of goodwill to the Athenians, had often been of service to them, and would be in the future. ,The Athenians believed that these things were true, and when they became prosperous they established a sacred precinct of Pan beneath the Acropolis. Ever since that message they propitiate him with annual sacrifices and a torch-race.
9. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.1-1.22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

10. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.6 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.6. Nor is this unaccountable or accidental; it is the result, firstly, of the fact that the gods often manifest their power in bodily presence. For instance in the Latin War, at the critical battle of Lake Regillus between the dictator Aulus Postumius and Octavius Mamilius of Tusculum, Castor and Pollux were seen fighting on horseback in our ranks. And in more modern history likewise these sons of Tyndareus brought the news of the defeat of Perses. What happened was that Publius Vatinius, the grandfather of our young contemporary, was returning to Rome by night from Reate, of which he was governor, when he was informed by two young warriors on white horses that King Perses had that very day been taken prisoner. When Vatinius carried the news to the Senate, at first he was flung into gaol on the charge of spreading an unfounded report on a matter of national concern; but afterwards a dispatch arrived from Paulus, and the date was found to tally, so the Senate bestowed upon Vatinius both a grant of land and exemption from military service. It is also recorded in history that when the Locrians won their great victory over the people of Crotona at the important battle of the River Sagra, news of the engagement was reported at the Olympic Games on the very same day. often has the sound of the voices of the Fauns, often has the apparition of a divine form compelled anyone that is not either feeble-minded or impious to admit the real presence of the gods.
11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 3.19.12 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.19.12. The first to sail thither legend says was Leonymus of Crotona . For when war had arisen between the people of Crotona and the Locri in Italy, the Locri, in virtue of the relationship between them and the Opuntians, called upon Ajax son of Oileus to help them in battle. So Leonymus the general of the people of Crotona attacked his enemy at that point where he heard that Ajax was posted in the front line. Now he was wounded in the breast, and weak with his hurt came to Delphi . When he arrived the Pythian priestess sent Leonynius to White Island, telling him that there Ajax would appear to him and cure his wound.
12. Justinus, Epitome Historiarum Philippicarum, 24.8.5

13. Mimnermus, Fragments, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaean Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
aeacidae Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
aegina Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
aethra Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
ajax, son of telamon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
ajax Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
amorgos Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
apollo Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
arcadia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
archilochus, i, v, vii, ix, xi Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190
archon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 735
ares Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
artemisium Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 196
athena, in battle Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
athena Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171, 188, 196, 476
aulis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
boedeker, deborah Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193, 196
calaïs Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 196
calchas Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
chronology Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
citizen Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 193, 476
clymene Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
colophon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
croton Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
cypria Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
demeas Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 735
demodocus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
desire Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
dioscuri Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
dioskouroi Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
elea Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
epic, i Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196, 476
epiphany, of god Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
epiphany, of hero' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
epiphany Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
erxies Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 476
euenus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 284
euphron Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 284
exhortation, ix Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 735
first person plural Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 735
galatians Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
glaucus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171
hades Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 284
helen Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
hera Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
hermes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 196
hesiod Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
hexameters Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
historiography, i Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 193, 196, 735
homer Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196, 476
iliad Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
immortal Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
intervention, divine Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
kontoleon, nikolaos Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 735
laconia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
lake regillus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
lavinium Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
leonymus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
lesbos Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 735
locris, western Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
lyre Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171
marathon Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
menelaus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 196
messenia Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
mimnermus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196, 284
mnesiepes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 735
myth Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 193
nanno, smyrneis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
narrative elegy Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 735
naxos, naxian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 190, 735
odysseus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193, 284
odyssey Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
oracle Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
pan Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
panhellenic Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
parody Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
paros, parian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 284, 735
peisistratus, of paros (?) Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171
penelope Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 284
performance context Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
perfume Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
persia, persian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
philippides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
pipe Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171
plataea Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
plutarch Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190
polis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 735
prose Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171, 190, 193, 196
sagra Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
salamis Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 190; Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 216
seduction Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
semonides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193
ship Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
simonides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 196
solon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 193, 284
sosthenes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171, 190, 735
sparta Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
spartan Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
speech Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 190, 196
tantalus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190
telamon Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
telesicles Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
tetrameters Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 190, 193
thasos, thasian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171, 188, 190, 476, 735
theognis and the theognidea Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 284
theopompus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
thrace, thracian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171, 188, 190, 476, 735
thucydides Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
tisamenus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
trochaic tetrameters Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 190, 476
troy Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 193, 196, 476
tyndaridae Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188
tyrtaeus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196, 284
war, peloponnesian Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 196
war, trojan Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 476
wife Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 284
zetes Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 188, 196
zeus Bowie, Essays on Ancient Greek Literature and Culture (2021) 171, 188, 193, 476