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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1103
Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 462-469


ἦτοι μὲν τά γε κεῖται ἀλίγκια δινωτοῖσινCIRCLES OF THE CELESTIAL SPHERE: These orbits lie like rings, four in number, chief in interest and in profit, if thou wouldst mark the measures of the waning and the waxing of the Horae (seasons). On all are set beacon lights, many in number, all every way closely penned together. The circles are immovable, and fitted each to other, but in size two are matched with two. If ever on a clear night, when Night in the heavens shows to men all her stars in their brightness and no star is borne faintly gleaming at the mid-month moon, but they all sharply pierce the darkness – if in such an hour wonder rises in thy heart to mark on every side the heaven cleft by a broad belt, or if someone at they side point out that circle set with brilliants – that is what men call the Milky Way. A match for it in colour thou wilt find no circle wheel, but in size two of the four belts as large, but the other two are far inferior.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Aratus Solensis, Phaenomena, 454-459, 46, 460-461, 463-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-552, 594-595, 682, 729, 732, 45 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

45. τὰς δέ διʼ ἀμφοτέρας οἵη ποταμοῖο ἀπορρώξ
2. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 5.195-5.234 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Vergil, Georgics, 1.176-1.186, 1.197-1.203, 1.233-1.249, 1.257, 1.351-1.355, 1.394, 1.425-1.426, 1.432, 1.439 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.176. And hem with hounds the mighty forest-glades. 1.177. Soon one with hand-net scourges the broad stream 1.178. Probing its depths, one drags his dripping toil 1.179. Along the main; then iron's unbending might 1.180. And shrieking saw-blade,—for the men of old 1.181. With wedges wont to cleave the splintering log;— 1.182. Then divers arts arose; toil conquered all 1.183. Remorseless toil, and poverty's shrewd push 1.184. In times of hardship. Ceres was the first 1.185. Set mortals on with tools to turn the sod 1.186. When now the awful groves 'gan fail to bear 1.197. Prune with thy hook the dark field's matted shade 1.198. Pray down the showers, all vainly thou shalt eye 1.199. Alack! thy neighbour's heaped-up harvest-mow 1.200. And in the greenwood from a shaken oak 1.201. Seek solace for thine hunger. 1.202. Now to tell 1.203. The sturdy rustics' weapons, what they are 1.233. Or burrow for their bed the purblind moles 1.234. Or toad is found in hollows, and all the swarm 1.235. of earth's unsightly creatures; or a huge 1.236. Corn-heap the weevil plunders, and the ant 1.237. Fearful of coming age and penury. 1.238. Mark too, what time the walnut in the wood 1.239. With ample bloom shall clothe her, and bow down 1.240. Her odorous branches, if the fruit prevail 1.241. Like store of grain will follow, and there shall come 1.242. A mighty winnowing-time with mighty heat; 1.243. But if the shade with wealth of leaves abound 1.244. Vainly your threshing-floor will bruise the stalk 1.245. Rich but in chaff. Many myself have seen 1.246. Steep, as they sow, their pulse-seeds, drenching them 1.247. With nitre and black oil-lees, that the fruit 1.248. Might swell within the treacherous pods, and they 1.249. Make speed to boil at howso small a fire. 1.257. His arms to slacken, lo! with headlong force 1.351. Coeus, Iapetus, and Typhoeus fell 1.352. And those sworn brethren banded to break down 1.353. The gates of heaven; thrice, sooth to say, they strove 1.354. Ossa on placeName key= 1.355. Aye, and on Ossa to up-roll amain 1.394. When Spring the rain-bringer comes rushing down 1.425. And through what heavenly cycles wandereth 1.426. The glowing orb Cyllenian. Before all 1.432. Then sleep is sweet, and dark the shadows fall 1.439. Attend it, and with shouts bid Ceres come


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83; Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
astronomy (astronomical) Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
authenticity Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
corpus, of astronomical poems Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
corpus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
eudoxus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
gods, in the georgics Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
hipparchus Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
intertextuality Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
jupiter Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
lucretius, agriculture in Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
main points Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
obscurity (ἀσάφεια) Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
prefatory letter Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
providentialism Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
purpose Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
style Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
teacher Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
title Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
virgil, and aratus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
virgil, reception of lucretius Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
zeus Gale, Virgil on the Nature of Things: The Georgics, Lucretius and the Didactic Tradition (2000) 83
γνήσιον Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
διαίρεσις Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179
τµῆµα' Motta and Petrucci, Isagogical Crossroads from the Early Imperial Age to the End of Antiquity (2022) 179