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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1085
Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 1.5-1.19


nanAs it kept happening, and many were harmed, public indignation grew, and the people decreed the severest punishment, stoning to death next day. But with the power of her chanting she thwarted their plan. Just as Medea, in that one short day she won from Creon, consumed his daughter, his palace, and the old king himself in the flames from the golden crown, so Meroe, by chanting necromantic rites in a ditch, as she told me herself when she was drunk, shut all the people in their houses, with the dumb force of her magic powers. For two whole days not one of them could break the locks, rip open the doors, or even dig a way through the walls, until at last, at everyone's mutual urging, they called out, swearing a solemn oath not to lay hands on her themselves, and to come to her defence and save her if anyone tried to do so. Thus propitiated she freed the whole town. But as for the author of the original decree, she snatched him up in the dead of night with his whole house – that's walls and floor and foundations entire – and shifted them, the doors still locked, a hundred miles to another town on the top of a rugged and arid mountain; and since the densely-packed homes of those folk left no room for the new guest, she dropped the house in front of the gates and vanished.


nanWhat you relate is marvellous, dear Socrates," I said, "and wild. In short you've roused no little anxiety, even fear, in me too. I'm struck with no mere pebble here, but a spear, lest with the aid of those same magic forces that old woman might have heard our conversation. So let's go to bed early, and weariness relieved by sleep, leave before dawn and get as far away as we can." While I was still relaying sound advice, the good Socrates, gripped by the effects of this unaccustomed tippling, and his great exhaustion, was already asleep and snoring. I shut the door tight, slid home the bolts, even pushed my bed hard against the door frame, and threw myself down on top. At first, from fear, I lay awake for a while; then about midnight I shut my eyes somewhat. I had just fallen asleep when it seemed the door suddenly burst open, with greater violence than any burglar could achieve. The hinges were shattered and torn from their sockets, and the door hurled to the ground. My bed, being low, with a dodgy foot and its wood rotten, collapsed from the force of such violence, and I rolled out and struck the floor while the bed landed upside-down on top, hiding and covering me.


nanThen I felt that natural phenomenon where certain emotions are expressed through their contraries. At that instant, just as tears will often flow from joy, I couldn't keep from laughing at being turned from Aristomenes to a tortoise. Hurled to the floor, from a corner of my eye, beneath the welcome protection of my bed, I watched two women of rather ripe years. One bore a lighted lamp, the other a sponge and naked blade. Thus equipped they circled the soundly sleeping Socrates. The one with the sword spoke: 'Panthia, my sister, this is my dear Endymion, my Ganymede, who made sport with my youth, day and night, who not only scorned my secret love insultingly, but even plotted to escape. Am I really to be deserted like Calypso by a cunning Ulysses, and condemned, in turn, to weep in everlasting loneliness?' Then she stretched out her hand, and pointed me out to her friend Panthia. 'And this is his good counsellor Aristomenes, who was the author of his escape, and now lies close to death, stretched on the ground, sprawled beneath his little bed, watching it all. He thinks he's going to recount his insults to me with impunity. I'll make him regret his past jibes and his present nosiness later, if not sooner, if not right now!'


nanWhen I heard that, my wretched flesh dissolved in a cold sweat, my guts trembled and quaked, till the bed on my back shaken by my quivering swayed and leapt about. 'Well then sister,' gentle Panthia replied 'why not grab him first and like Bacchantes tear him limb from limb, or tie him up at least and cut his balls off?' Meroe – for I realised it was truly her in line with Socrates' tale – replied: 'No, let him survive at least to cover this wretch's corpse with a little earth.' And with that she pushed Socrates' head to the side and buried her blade in the left of his neck all the way to the hilt. Then she held a flask of leather against the wound and carefully collected the spurt of blood so not a single drop was visible anywhere. I saw all this with my very own eyes. Next, so as not to deviate, I suppose, from the sacrificial rites, she stuck her right hand into the wound right down to his innards, felt for my poor comrade's heart, and plucked it out. At this a sort of cry rose from his windpipe slashed by the weapon's stroke, or at least an indistinct gurgle and he poured out his life's breath. Panthia stopped the gaping wound with her sponge, saying: 'Oh, sponge born in the sea, take care not to fall in the river,' and with this they abandoned him, removed my bed, spread their feet, squatted over my face, and discharged their bladders till I was drenched with a stream of the foulest urine.


nanNo sooner had they exited the threshold than the door untouched swung back to its original position: the hinges settled back in their sockets, the brackets returned to the posts, and the bolts slid home. But I remained where I was, sprawled on the ground, inanimate, naked, cold, and covered in piss, as if I'd just emerged from my mother's womb. No, it was truly more like being half-dead, but also in truth my own survivor, a posthumous child, or rather a sure candidate for crucifixion. 'When he's found in the morning,' I said to myself, 'his throat cut, what will happen to you? If you tell the truth who on earth will believe it? You could at least have shouted for help, if a great man like you couldn't handle the women by yourself. A man has his throat cut before your eyes, and you do nothing! And if you say it was robbers why wouldn't they have killed you too? Why would their savagery spare you as a witness to crime to inform on them? So, having escaped death, you can go and meet it again!' As night crept towards day, I kept turning it over in my mind. I decided the best thing to do was to sneak off just before dawn, and hit the road with tremulous steps. I picked up my little bag, pushed the key in the lock and tried to slide back the bolts; but that good and faithful door, which in the night had unlocked of its own accord, only opened at last after much labour and endless twiddling of the key.


nanThe porter was lying on the ground at the entrance to the inn, still half-asleep when I cried: 'Hey there, where are you? Open the gate! I want to be gone by daybreak!' 'What!' he answered, 'Don't you know the road's thick with brigands? Who goes travelling at this hour of the night? Even if you've a crime on your conscience and want to die, I'm not pumpkin-headed enough to let you.' 'Dawn's not far off,' I said, 'and anyway, what can robbers take from an utter pauper? Or are you not aware, ignoramus, that even a dozen wrestling-masters can't despoil a naked man?' Then half-conscious and weak with sleep he turned over on his other side, saying: 'How do I know you haven't slit the throat of that traveller you were with last night, and are doing a runner to save yourself?' In an instant, I know I saw the earth gape wide, and there was the pit of Tartarus with dog-headed Cerberus ready to eat me. I thought how sweet Meroe had spared my throat not from mercy but in her cruelty had reserved me for crucifixion.


nanSo I slipped back to the bedroom and reflected on the quickest way to die. Since Fate had left me no other weapon but my little bed, I talked to it: 'Now, now my little cot, dear friend of mine, who've suffered so many tribulations with me, and know and can judge what went on last night, and the only witness I could summon to testify to my innocence at the trial. I'm in a hurry to die, so be the instrument that will save me.' With this I began to unravel the cord that laced its frame. Then I threw one end over a little beam that stuck out into the room, below the window, and tied it fast. I made a noose in the other end, scrambled up on the bed, got high enough for the drop to work, and stuck my head through the noose. With one foot I kicked away the support I stood on, so my weight on the cord would squeeze my throat tight and stop me breathing. But in a trice the rope, which was old and rotten, broke, and I crashed down on top of Socrates who was lying there beside me, and rolled with him on to the ground.


nanBut behold at that moment the porter arrived shouting loudly: 'Hey you! In the middle of the night you can't wait to take off, now here you are under the covers snoring!' Then Socrates, woken by our fall, or by the fellow's raucous yelling, got to his feet first, saying: 'It's no wonder guests hate porters, since here's this inquisitive chap bursting importunately into our room – after stealing something no doubt – and waking me, weak as I was, out of a lovely sleep with his monstrous din.' I leapt up eagerly, filled with unexpected joy, and cried: 'Behold, oh faithful porter, here's my friend, as dear as father or brother, whom you in your drunken state accused me, slanderously, of murdering,' and I straight away hugged Socrates and started kissing him. But he, stunned by the vile stench of the liquid those monsters had drenched me with, shoved me off violently. 'Away with you!' he cried, 'You stink like the foulest sewer!' then began to ask as a friend will the reason for the mess. I invented some absurd, some miserable little joke on the spur of the moment, and drew his attention away again to another subject of conversation. Then clasping him I said: 'Why don't we go now, and grasp the chance of an early morning amble?' And I picked up my little bag, paid the bill for our stay at the inn, and off we went.


nanSocrates' death We were quite a way off before the sun rose, lighting everything. Carefully, since I was curious, I examined the place on my friend's neck where I'd seen the blade enter, I said to myself: 'You're mad, you were in your cups and sodden with wine, and had a dreadful nightmare. Look, Socrates is sound and whole, totally unscathed. Where are the wound and the sponge? Where's the deep and recent scar?' I turned to him: 'Those doctors are not without merit who say that swollen with food and drink we have wild and oppressive dreams. Take me now. I took too much to drink last evening, and a bad night brought such dire and violent visions I still feel as though I was spattered, polluted with human blood.' He grinned at that: 'It's piss not blood you're soaked with. I dreamed too, that my throat was cut. I felt the pain in my neck, and even thought my heart had been torn from my body. And now I'm still short of breath, and my knees are trembling, and I'm staggering along, and I need a bite to eat to restore my spirits.' 'Here's breakfast,' I said 'all ready for you,' and I swung the sack from my shoulder and quickly handed him bread and cheese. 'Let's sit by that plane tree,' I said.


nanHaving done so, I took something from the sack for myself, and watched him eating avidly, but visibly weaker, somehow more drawn and emaciated, and with the pallor of boxwood. In short the colour of his flesh was so disturbing it conjured up the vision of those Furies of the night before, and my terror was such the first bit of bread I took, though only a small one, struck in my throat, and it wouldn't go down, or come back up. The absence of anyone else on the road added to my fear. Who could believe my companion was murdered, and I was innocent? Now he, when he'd had enough, began to feel quite thirsty, since he'd gobbled the best part of a whole cheese in his eagerness. A gentle stream flowed sluggishly not far from the plane-tree's roots, flowing on through a quiet pool, the colour of glass or silver. 'Here,' I cried, 'quench your thirst with the milky waters of this spring.' He rose and after a brief search for a level place at the edge of the bank, he sank down on his knees and bent forward ready to drink. But his lips had not yet touched the surface of the water when in a trice the wound in his throat gaped open, and out flew the sponge, with a little trickle of blood. Then his lifeless body pitched forward, almost into the stream, except that I caught at one of his legs, and with a mighty effort dragged him higher onto the bank. I mourned for him there, as much as circumstance allowed, and covered him with sandy soil to rest there forever beside the water. Then trembling and fearful of my life I fled through remote and pathless country, like a man with murder on his conscience, abandoning home and country, embracing voluntary exile. Now I live in Aetolia, and I'm married again.'


nanWhat you promise," he said, "is fair and just, and I'll repeat what I left unfinished. But first I swear to you, by the all-seeing god of the Sun, I'm speaking things I know to be true; and you'll have no doubt when you arrive at the next Thessalian town and find the story on everyone's lips of a happening in plain daylight. But first so you know who I am, I'm from Aegium. And here's how I make my living: I deal in cheese and honey, all that sort of innkeeper's stuff, travelling here and there through Boeotia, Aetolia, Thessaly. So when I learned that at Hypata, Thessaly's most important town, some fresh cheese with a fine flavour was being sold at a very good price, I rushed there, in a hurry to buy the lot. But as usual I went left foot first, and my hopes of a profit were dashed. A wholesale dealer called Lupus had snapped it up the day before. So, exhausted after my useless chase, I started to walk to the baths as Venus began to shine.


nanSocrates' misfortune "Suddenly I caught sight of my old friend Socrates, sitting on the ground, half-concealed in a ragged old cloak, so pale I hardly knew him, sadly thin and shrunken, like one of those Fate discards to beg at street corners. In that state, even though I knew him well, I approached him with doubt in my mind: 'Well, Socrates, my friend, what's happened? How dreadful you look! What shame! Back home they've already mourned, and given you up for dead. By the provincial judge's decree guardians have been appointed for your children; and your wife, the funeral service done, her looks marred by endless tears and grief, her sight nearly lost from weeping, is being urged by her parents to ease the family misfortune with the joy of a fresh marriage. And here you are, looking like a ghost, to our utter shame!'


nan'Aristomenes,' he said, 'you can't know the slippery turns of Fortune; the shifting assaults; the string of reverses.' With that he threw his tattered cloak over a face that long since had blushed with embarrassment, leaving the rest of himself, from navel to thighs, bare. I could endure the sight of such terrible suffering no longer, grasped him and tried to set him on his feet. But he remained as he was; his head shrouded, and cried: 'No, no, let Fate have more joy of the spoils she puts on display!' I made him follow me, and removing one or two of my garments clothed him hastily or rather hid him, then dragged him off to the baths in a trice. I myself found what was needed for oiling and drying; and with effort scraped off the solid layers of dirt; that done, I carried him off to an inn, tired myself, supporting his exhausted frame with some effort. I laid him on the bed; filled him with food; relaxed him with wine, soothed him with talk. Now he was ready for conversation, laughter, a witty joke, even some modest repartee, when suddenly a painful sob rose from the depths of his chest, and he beat his brow savagely with his hand. 'Woe is me,' he cried, 'I was chasing after the delights of a famous gladiatorial show, when I fell into this misfortune. For, as you know well, I'd gone to Macedonia on a business trip, and after nine months labouring there I was on my way back home a wealthier man. Just before I reached Larissa, where I was going to watch the show by the way, walking along a rough and desolate valley, I was attacked by fierce bandits, and stripped of all I had. At last I escaped, weak as I was, and reached an inn belonging to a mature yet very attractive woman named Meroe, and told her about my lengthy journey, my desire for home, and the wretched robbery. She treated me more than kindly, with a welcome and generous meal, and quickly aroused by lust, steered me to her bed. At once I was done for, the moment I slept with her; that one bout of sex infected me with a long and pestilential relationship; she's even had the clothes those kind robbers left me, and the meagre wages I've earned heaving sacks while I still could, until at last evil Fortune and my good 'wife' reduced me to the state you saw not long ago.'


nanBy Pollux!" I said "You deserve the worst, if there's anything worse than what you got, for preferring the joys of Venus and a wrinkled whore to your home and kids." "But shocked and stunned he placed his index finger to his lips: "Quiet, quiet!" he said then glancing round, making sure it was safe to speak: "Beware of a woman with magic powers, lest your intemperate speech do you a mischief." "Really?" I said, "What sort of a woman is this high and mighty innkeeper?" "A witch" he said, "with divine powers to lower the sky, and halt the globe, make fountains stone, and melt the mountains, raise the ghosts and summon the gods, extinguish the stars and illuminate Tartarus itself." "Oh come," said I, "dispense with the melodrama, away with stage scenery; use the common tongue." "Do you," he replied "wish to hear one or two, or more, of her doings? Because the fact she can make all men fall for her, and not just the locals but Indians, and the Ethiopian savages of orient and occident, and even men who live on the opposite side of the Earth, that's only a tithe of her art, the merest bagatelle. Just listen to what she's perpetrated in front of witnesses.


nanOne of her lovers had misbehaved with someone else, so with a single word she changed him into a beaver, a creature that, fearing capture, escapes from the hunters by biting off its own testicles to confuse the hounds with their scent, and she intended the same for him, for having it off with another woman. Then there was another innkeeper, nearby, in competition, and she changed him into a frog; now the old man swims in a vat of his own wine, hides in the dregs, and calls out humbly to his past customers with raucous croaks. And because he spoke against her she turned a lawyer into a sheep, and now as a sheep he pleads his case. When the wife of a lover of hers, who was carrying at the time, insulted her wittily, she condemned her to perpetual pregnancy by closing her womb to prevent the birth, and according to everyone's computation that poor woman's been burdened for eight years or more and she's big as an elephant!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.4, 22.71 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.4. /The wrath sing, goddess, of Peleus' son, Achilles, that destructive wrath which brought countless woes upon the Achaeans, and sent forth to Hades many valiant souls of heroes, and made them themselves spoil for dogs and every bird; thus the plan of Zeus came to fulfillment 22.71. /which then having drunk my blood in the madness of their hearts, shall lie there in the gateway. A young man it beseemeth wholly, when he is slain in battle, that he lie mangled by the sharp bronze; dead though he be, all is honourable whatsoever be seen. But when dogs work shame upon the hoary head and hoary beard
2. Homer, Odyssey, 8.83 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 29 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

237a. Phaedrus. Speak then. Socrates. Do you know what I’m going to do? Phaedrus. About what? Socrates. I’m going to keep my head wrapped up while I talk, that I may get through my discourse as quickly as possible and that I may not look at you and become embarrassed. Phaedrus. Only speak, and in other matters suit yourself. Socrates. Come then, O tuneful Muses, whether ye receive this name from the quality of your song or from the musical race of the Ligyans, grant me your aid in the tale this most excellent man compels me to relate
5. Xenophon, On Household Management, 7-10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.94 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.339-6.381 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.9-4.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.9. lit up all lands, and from the vaulted heaven 4.10. Aurora had dispelled the dark and dew;
9. Statius, Siluae, 3.2.121-3.2.126 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 6.21-6.22, 7.13, 8.11-8.14 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Anon., The Acts of John, 56 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Anon., Acts of Thomas, 20, 104 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

104. Now Siphor stood before the king, and he inquired of him: Who is that sorcerer and whence, and what teacheth he whom thou hast lurking in thine house? And Siphor answered the king: Thou art not ignorant, O king, what trouble and grief I, with my friends had concerning my wife, whom thou knowest and many others remember, and concerning my daughter, whom I value more than all my possessions, what a time and trial I suffered; for I became a laughing-stock and a curse in all our country. And I heard the report of this man and went to him and entreated him, and took him and brought him hither. And as I came by the way I saw wonderful and amazing things: and here also many did hear the wild ass and concerning that devil whom he drove out, and healed my wife and daughter, and now are they whole; and he asked no reward but requireth faith and holiness, that men should become partakers with him in that which he doeth: and this he teacheth to worship and fear one God, the ruler of all things, and Jesus Christ his Son, that they may have eternal life. And that which he eateth is bread and salt, and his drink is water from evening unto evening, and he maketh many prayers; and whatsoever he asketh of his God, he giveth him. And he teacheth that this God is holy and mighty, and that Christ is living and maketh alive, wherefore also he chargeth them that are there present to come unto him in holiness and purity and love and faith.
13. Anon., Acts of John, 56 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

14. Anon., Acts of Peter, 28 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Apuleius, Apology, 31, 27 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Apuleius, The Golden Ass, 1.2, 1.2.6, 1.5-1.9, 1.11-1.26, 1.18.8, 2.1, 2.5-2.6, 2.20-2.22, 2.20.4, 2.22.3, 2.25, 2.27-2.28, 2.30, 3.19, 3.24, 3.28, 4.13, 5.17-5.18, 8.11, 9.29, 10.5-10.6, 10.20-10.22, 10.26, 11.10.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Heliodorus, Ethiopian Story, 3.11 (2nd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

18. Anon., The Acts of Paul And Thecla, 20, 15 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

19. Ps.-Lucian, Onos, 5-6, 11



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of paul and thecla, crowd Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 201
aeneas Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 263
aesernia McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 17
ainianes Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
aithiopika Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
alcohol McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16, 17
animals, metamorphosis into Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
anna perenna Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 263
apocryphal acts, magic Bremmer, Magic and Martyrs in Early Christianity: Collected Essays (2017) 201
apollonius (king of tyre) Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 69
apuleius, metamorphoses Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224; König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 285, 286
apuleius, worries about elite status König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 285
apuleius Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224; Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 72
archistrate Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
aristomenes Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224; Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48, 49, 50; Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
asinus aureus, titles of Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
asinus aureus / the golden ass / metamorphoses Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 336
athens McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16
augustus (see also octavian) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
austen, jane, northanger abbey Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 222
autobiography Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48
banquet Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
beavers Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49
blood, symbolism of Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
body Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 370
byrrhena Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49
callisto Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
cannibalism, and consumption of human flesh in fiction König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 286
caupona McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16
caupones McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 17
cervantes, miguel de, don quixote Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 222
chloe Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
christian literature, acts of paul and thekla Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59, 69
christian literature Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
circe Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48
colonna, cardinal giovanni Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 222
corinth Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224
curiosity Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 50; Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
daphnis Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
de certeau, michel Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223
death Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 336
deversorium/a McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16
dido Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 263
dionysias Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 69
domitian, as new augustus Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 263
double dreams and visions, differing use of natural features Moxon, Peter's Halakhic Nightmare: The 'Animal' Vision of Acts 10:9–16 in Jewish and Graeco-Roman Perspective (2017) 317
empedocles Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 72
ethnographic writing, barbarian eating and drinking König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 286
fortuna Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48
geographical Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224
geography, cognitive Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
geography Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
gold Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
graffiti McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 17
haptics Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
hippo Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
hotels, inns, restaurants, and taverns McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16, 17
hypata Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224; Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49, 50
io Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
isis Putnam et al., The Poetic World of Statius' Silvae (2023) 263
justice Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49
larissa Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
latona Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48
law Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49, 50
lefebvre, henri Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223
leukippe (leucippe) Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
love, sex and seduction in convivial contexts König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 286
luciad Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48
lucian, onos Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224
lucius Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 222, 335, 336
lucius of patrai, metamorphoses Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223
magic Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48, 49, 50, 63; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 335, 336
magical Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
marriage Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 69
meritorium/a McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16
meroe Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224; Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48, 49, 50; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 335, 336
meroë (witch) Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
metamorphosis, audience reaction to / interpretation of Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 50, 63
novels Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
octavian (see also augustus) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
odysseus Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48; Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 335
onos, as epitome Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48
onos, as parody Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48
orpheus, orphism Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 72
osiris Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 72
ovid Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49
paideia Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
palaestra Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
pamphile Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 336
paris (see also helen and paris) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
perpetua Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
persinna Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
photios Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223
photis Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 335
pimps, in taverns and inns McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 17
place, as gendered Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
plane tree Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
plato and platonism Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
popina/ae McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16, 17
prison Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
pseudo-lucian, onos König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 285
psyche Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49
rape Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 69
residential housing McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16, 17
roman law Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 72
roses, connection of with gold Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63
sacrifice, protagonist threatened with Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
sacrifice Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
semanticisation Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223
sheep Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49, 50
slaves Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
sleep Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 222
socrates Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224; Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 335, 370
socrates (character) Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
socrates (character in asinus aureus) Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48, 49, 50, 63
socrates (philosopher) Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
socratic dialogue Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
sorceress Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
space, private Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59, 69
stereotype (see also gender) Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223
stranguillio Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 69
superbia Pinheiro et al., Cultural Crossroads in the Ancient Novel (2018) 336
taberna/ae McGinn, The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel (2004) 16, 17
tarsia Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59, 69
theater and theatricality Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
thekla Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59, 69
thelyphron Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49
theophilus Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 69
thessalian Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
thessaly Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224; Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 50
tomb, symbolism of Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
tomb Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
topographical Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 224
twelve tables, law of the Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 72
venus, in cupid and psyche Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 49
virginity, fetish, as Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
virginity, male Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
virginity Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
wine' König, Saints and Symposiasts: The Literature of Food and the Symposium in Greco-Roman and Early Christian Culture (2012) 286
winkler, j. j., bessa, of Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 59
witch Fabre-Serris et al., Identities, Ethnicities and Gender in Antiquity (2021) 223, 224
witches Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 48, 49, 50
witches and witchcraft Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 135
xenophon, of athens Pinheiro et al., Narrating Desire: Eros, Sex, and Gender in the Ancient Novel (2012a) 69
zeus Fletcher, The Ass of the Gods: Apuleius' Golden Ass, the Onos Attributed to Lucian, and Graeco-Roman Metamorphosis Literature (2023) 63