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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1051
Apollonius Of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.230-4.235
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1. Homer, Iliad, 1.9-1.10, 1.12-1.13, 1.18-1.19, 1.24-1.45, 1.50-1.168, 1.176-1.177, 1.183-1.248, 1.254-1.273, 1.275-1.284, 1.287-1.290, 1.292-1.302 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.9. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.10. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.12. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.13. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.18. /but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.19. /but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.24. /out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.25. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.26. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.27. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.28. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.29. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.30. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.31. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.32. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.33. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.34. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. So he spoke, and the old man was seized with fear and obeyed his word. He went forth in silence along the shore of the loud-resounding sea, and earnestly then, when he had gone apart, the old man prayed 1.35. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.36. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.37. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.38. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.39. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.40. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.41. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.42. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.43. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.44. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.45. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.50. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.51. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.52. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.53. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.54. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.55. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.56. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.57. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.58. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.59. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.60. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.61. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.62. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.63. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.64. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.65. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.66. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.67. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.68. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.69. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose Calchas son of Thestor, far the best of bird-diviners, who knew the things that were, and that were to be, and that had been before 1.70. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.71. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.72. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.73. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.74. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.75. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.76. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.77. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.78. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.79. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.80. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.81. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.82. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.83. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.84. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.85. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.86. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.87. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.88. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.89. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.90. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.91. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.92. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.93. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.94. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. Then the blameless seer took heart, and spoke:It is not then because of a vow that he finds fault, nor because of a hecatomb, but because of the priest whom Agamemnon dishonoured, and did not release his daughter nor accept the ransom. 1.95. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.96. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.97. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.98. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.99. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.100. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.101. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.102. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.103. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.104. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.105. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.106. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.107. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.108. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.109. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.110. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.111. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.112. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.113. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.114. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.115. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.116. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.117. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.118. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.119. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.120. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.121. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.122. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.123. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.124. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.125. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.126. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.127. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.128. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.129. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.130. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.131. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.132. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.133. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.134. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.135. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.136. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.137. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.138. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.139. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.140. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.141. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.142. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.143. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.144. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.145. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.146. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.147. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.148. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.149. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.150. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.151. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.152. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.153. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.154. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.155. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.156. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.157. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.158. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.159. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.160. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.161. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.162. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.165. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.166. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.167. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.176. /Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not 1.177. /Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not 1.183. /nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.184. /nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.185. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.186. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.187. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.188. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.189. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.190. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.191. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.192. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.193. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.194. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.195. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.196. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.223. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.225. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.226. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.227. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.228. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.229. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.230. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.231. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.232. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.233. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.234. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.235. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.236. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.237. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.238. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.239. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.240. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.241. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.242. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.243. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.244. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. So spoke the son of Peleus, and down to the earth he dashed 1.245. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.246. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.247. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.248. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.254. /who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.255. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.256. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.257. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.258. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.259. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.260. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.261. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.262. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.263. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.264. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.265. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.266. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.267. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.268. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.269. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.270. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.271. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.272. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.273. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.275. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.276. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.277. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.278. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.279. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.280. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.281. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.282. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.283. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.284. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.287. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.288. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.289. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.290. /do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me 1.297. /for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship
2. Homer, Odyssey, 9.225-9.227, 9.253-9.255, 9.279 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 4.221-4.223 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Herodotus, Histories, 3.1, 3.31, 3.35, 7.20-7.21 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.1. Cyrus' son Cambyses was leading an army of his subjects, Ionian and Aeolian Greeks among them, against this Amasis for the following reason. Cambyses had sent a herald to Egypt asking Amasis for his daughter; he asked on the advice of an Egyptian, who advised it out of resentment against Amasis, that out of all the Egyptian physicians Amasis had dragged him away from his wife and children and sent him up to Persia when Cyrus sent to Amasis asking for the best eye-doctor in Egypt . ,Out of resentment, the Egyptian by his advice induced Cambyses to ask Amasis for his daughter, so that Amasis would either be wretched if he gave her, or hated by Cambyses if he did not. Amasis, intimidated by the power of Persia and frightened, could neither give his daughter nor refuse her; for he knew well that Cambyses was not going to take her as his wife but as his concubine. ,After considering the matter, he did as follows. There was a daughter of the former king Apries, all that was left of that family, quite tall and pretty, and her name was Nitetis; this girl Amasis adorned with clothes and gold and sent to Cambyses as his own daughter. ,But after a time, as he embraced her addressing her as the daughter of Amasis, the girl said to him, “O King, you do not understand how you have been made a fool of by Amasis, who dressed me in finery and sent me to you as his own daughter, when I am in fact the daughter of Apries, the ruler Amasis revolted from with the Egyptians and killed.” ,This speech and this crime that occurred turned Cyrus' son Cambyses, furiously angry, against Egypt . So the Persians say. 3.31. This, they say, was the first of Cambyses' evil acts; next, he destroyed his full sister, who had come with him to Egypt, and whom he had taken to wife. ,He married her in this way (for before this, it had by no means been customary for Persians to marry their sisters): Cambyses was infatuated with one of his sisters and when he wanted to marry her, because his intention was contrary to usage, he summoned the royal judges and inquired whether there were any law enjoining one, that so desired, to marry his sister. ,These royal judges are men chosen out from the Persians to function until they die or are detected in some injustice; it is they who decide suits in Persia and interpret the laws of the land; all matters are referred to them. ,These then replied to Cambyses with an answer which was both just and prudent, namely, that they could find no law enjoining a brother to marry his sister; but that they had found a law permitting the King of Persia to do whatever he liked. ,Thus, although they feared Cambyses they did not break the law, and, to save themselves from death for keeping it, they found another law abetting one who wished to marry sisters. ,So Cambyses married the object of his desire; yet not long afterwards he took another sister as well. It was the younger of these who had come with him to Egypt, and whom he now killed. 3.35. Remembering this, then, he said to Prexaspes in his anger: “Judge then if the Persians speak the truth, or rather are themselves out of their minds when they speak of me so. ,Yonder stands your son in the porch; now if I shoot and pierce his heart, that will prove the Persians to be wrong; if I miss, then say that they are right and that I am out of my senses.” ,So saying, he strung his bow and hit the boy, and gave orders to open the fallen body and examine the wound: and the arrow being found in the heart, Cambyses laughed in great glee and said to the boy's father: ,“It is plain, Prexaspes, that I am in my right mind and the Persians mad; now tell me: what man in the world did you ever see that shot so true to the mark?” Prexaspes, it is said, replied (for he saw that Cambyses was mad, and he feared for his own life), “Master, I think that not even the god himself could shoot so true.” ,Thus did Cambyses then; at another time he took twelve Persians, equal to the noblest in the land, convicted them of some minor offense, and buried them alive up to the neck. 7.20. For full four years after the conquest of Egypt he was equipping his force and preparing all that was needed for it; before the fifth year was completed, he set forth on his march with the might of a great multitude. ,This was by far the greatest of all expeditions that we know of. The one that Darius led against the Scythians is nothing compared to it; neither is the Scythian expedition when they burst into Media in pursuit of the Cimmerians and subdued and ruled almost all the upper lands of Asia (it was for this that Darius afterwards attempted to punish them). According to the reports, the expedition led by the sons of Atreus against Troy is also nothing by comparison; neither is the one of the Mysians and Teucrians which before the Trojan war crossed the Bosporus into Europe, subdued all the Thracians, and came down to the Ionian sea, marching southward as far as the river Peneus. 7.21. All these expeditions and whatever others have happened in addition could not together be compared with this single one. For what nation did Xerxes not lead from Asia against Hellas? What water did not fail when being drunk up, except only the greatest rivers? ,Some people supplied him with ships, some were enrolled in his infantry, some were assigned the provision of horsemen, others of horse-bearing transports to follow the army, and others again of warships for the bridges, or of food and ships.
5. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.17, 1.462-1.474, 1.492-1.495, 1.861-1.876, 1.1284-1.1344, 2.1-2.29, 3.304, 3.316, 3.332-3.336, 3.366-3.385, 3.556-3.566, 3.577, 3.580-3.588, 3.594-3.600, 4.1-4.5, 4.11-4.25, 4.32-4.33, 4.35-4.81, 4.99, 4.121, 4.123-4.182, 4.184-4.186, 4.194-4.195, 4.198, 4.212-4.229, 4.231-4.297, 4.303-4.316, 4.323-4.521, 4.1051, 4.1209 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.17. ἠὲ καὶ ἀλλοδαποῖσι μετʼ ἀνδράσι νόστον ὀλέσσῃ. 1.462. τὸν δʼ ἄρʼ ὑποφρασθεὶς μεγάλῃ ὀπὶ νείκεσεν Ἴδας· 1.463. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε μετὰ φρεσὶ μῆτιν ἑλίσσεις; 1.464. αὔδα ἐνὶ μέσσοισι τεὸν νόον. ἦέ σε δαμνᾷ 1.465. τάρβος ἐπιπλόμενον, τό τʼ ἀνάλκιδας ἄνδρας ἀτύζει; 1.466. ἴστω νῦν δόρυ θοῦρον, ὅτῳ περιώσιον ἄλλων 1.467. κῦδος ἐνὶ πτολέμοισιν ἀείρομαι, οὐδέ μʼ ὀφέλλει 1.468. Ζεὺς τόσον, ὁσσάτιόν περ ἐμὸν δόρυ, μή νύ τι πῆμα 1.469. λοίγιον ἔσσεσθαι, μηδʼ ἀκράαντον ἄεθλον 1.470. Ἴδεω ἑσπομένοιο, καὶ εἰ θεὸς ἀντιόῳτο. 1.471. τοῖόν μʼ Ἀρήνηθεν ἀοσσητῆρα κομίζεις.’ 1.472. ἦ, καὶ ἐπισχόμενος πλεῖον δέπας ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.473. πῖνε χαλίκρητον λαρὸν μέθυ· δεύετο δʼ οἴνῳ 1.474. χείλεα, κυάνεαί τε γενειάδες· οἱ δʼ ὁμάδησαν 1.492. Χώετʼ ἐνιπτάζων· προτέρω δέ κε νεῖκος ἐτύχθη 1.493. εἰ μὴ δηριόωντας ὁμοκλήσαντες ἑταῖροι 1.494. αὐτός τʼ Αἰσονίδης κατερήτυεν· ἂν δὲ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς 1.495. λαιῇ ἀνασχόμενος κίθαριν πείραζεν ἀοιδῆς. 1.861. ἀμβολίη δʼ εἰς ἦμαρ ἀεὶ ἐξ ἤματος ἦεν 1.862. ναυτιλίης· δηρὸν δʼ ἂν ἐλίνυον αὖθι μένοντες 1.863. εἰ μὴ ἀολλίσσας ἑτάρους ἀπάνευθε γυναικῶν 1.864. Ἡρακλέης τοίοισιν ἐνιπτάζων μετέειπεν· 1.865. ‘δαιμόνιοι, πάτρης ἐμφύλιον αἷμʼ ἀποέργει 1.866. ἡμέας; ἦε γάμων ἐπιδευέες ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν 1.867. κεῖθεν, ὀνοσσάμενοι πολιήτιδας; αὖθι δʼ ἕαδεν 1.868. ναίοντας λιπαρὴν ἄροσιν Λήμνοιο ταμέσθαι; 1.869. οὐ μὰν εὐκλειεῖς γε σὺν ὀθνείῃσι γυναιξὶν 1.870. ἐσσόμεθʼ ὧδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἐελμένοι· οὐδέ τι κῶας 1.871. αὐτόματον δώσει τις ἑλὼν θεὸς εὐξαμένοισιν. 1.872. ἴομεν αὖτις ἕκαστοι ἐπὶ σφέα· τὸν δʼ ἐνὶ λέκτροις 1.873. Ὑψιπύλης εἰᾶτε πανήμερον, εἰσόκε Λῆμνον 1.874. παισὶν ἐσανδρώσῃ, μεγάλη τέ ἑ βάξις ἵκηται.’ 1.875. ὧς νείκεσσεν ὅμιλον· ἐναντία δʼ οὔ νύ τις ἔτλη 1.876. ὄμματʼ ἀνασχεθέειν, οὐδὲ προτιμυθήσασθαι· 1.1284. ἐν δέ σφιν κρατερὸν νεῖκος πέσεν, ἐν δὲ κολῳὸς 1.1285. ἄσπετος, εἰ τὸν ἄριστον ἀποπρολιπόντες ἔβησαν 1.1286. σφωιτέρων ἑτάρων. ὁ δʼ ἀμηχανίῃσιν ἀτυχθεὶς 1.1287. οὔτε τι τοῖον ἔπος μετεφώνεεν, οὔτε τι τοῖον 1.1288. Αἰσονίδης· ἀλλʼ ἧστο βαρείῃ νειόθεν ἄτῃ 1.1289. θυμὸν ἔδων· Τελαμῶνα δʼ ἕλεν χόλος, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 1.1290. ‘ἧσʼ αὔτως εὔκηλος, ἐπεί??ύ τοι ἄρμενον ἦεν 1.1291. Ἡρακλῆα λιπεῖν· σέο δʼ ἔκτοθι μῆτις ὄρωρεν 1.1292. ὄφρα τὸ κείνου κῦδος ἀνʼ Ἑλλάδα μή σε καλύψῃ 1.1293. αἴ κε θεοὶ δώωσιν ὑπότροπον οἴκαδε νόστον. 1.1294. ἀλλὰ τί μύθων ἦδος; ἐπεὶ καὶ νόσφιν ἑταίρων 1.1295. εἶμι τεῶν, οἳ τόνγε δόλον συνετεκτήναντο.’ 1.1296. ἦ, καὶ ἐς Ἁγνιάδην Τῖφυν θόρε· τὼ δέ οἱ ὄσσε 1.1297. ὄστλιγγες μαλεροῖο πυρὸς ὣς ἰνδάλλοντο. 1.1298. καί νύ κεν ἂψ ὀπίσω Μυσῶν ἐπὶ γαῖαν ἵκοντο 1.1299. λαῖτμα βιησάμενοι ἀνέμου τʼ ἄλληκτον ἰωήν 1.1300. εἰ μὴ Θρηικίοιο δύω υἷες Βορέαο 1.1301. Αἰακίδην χαλεποῖσιν ἐρητύεσκον ἔπεσσιν 1.1302. σχέτλιοι· ἦ τέ σφιν στυγερὴ τίσις ἔπλετʼ ὀπίσσω 1.1303. χερσὶν ὑφʼ Ἡρακλῆος, ὅ μιν δίζεσθαι ἔρυκον. 1.1304. ἄθλων γὰρ Πελίαο δεδουπότος ἂψ ἀνιόντας 1.1305. τήνῳ ἐν ἀμφιρύτῃ πέφνεν, καὶ ἀμήσατο γαῖαν 1.1306. ἀμφʼ αὐτοῖς, στήλας τε δύω καθύπερθεν ἔτευξεν 1.1307. ὧν ἑτέρη, θάμβος περιώσιον ἀνδράσι λεύσσειν 1.1308. κίνυται ἠχήεντος ὑπὸ πνοιῇ βορέαο. 1.1309. καὶ τὰ μὲν ὧς ἤμελλε μετὰ χρόνον ἐκτελέεσθαι. 1.1310. τοῖσιν δὲ Γλαῦκος βρυχίης ἁλὸς ἐξεφαάνθη 1.1311. Νηρῆος θείοιο πολυφράδμων ὑποφήτης· 1.1312. ὕψι δὲ λαχνῆέν τε κάρη καὶ στήθεʼ ἀείρας 1.1313. νειόθεν ἐκ λαγόνων στιβαρῇ ἐπορέξατο χειρὶ 1.1314. νηίου ὁλκαίοιο, καὶ ἴαχεν ἐσσυμένοισιν· 1.1315. ‘τίπτε παρὲκ μεγάλοιο Διὸς μενεαίνετε βουλὴν 1.1316. Αἰήτεω πτολίεθρον ἄγειν θρασὺν Ἡρακλῆα; 1.1317. Ἄργεΐ οἱ μοῖρʼ ἐστὶν ἀτασθάλῳ Εὐρυσθῆι 1.1318. ἐκπλῆσαι μογέοντα δυώδεκα πάντας ἀέθλους 1.1319. ναίειν δʼ ἀθανάτοισι συνέστιον, εἴ κʼ ἔτι παύρους 1.1320. ἐξανύσῃ· τῶ μή τι ποθὴ κείνοιο πελέσθω. 1.1321. αὔτως δʼ αὖ Πολύφημον ἐπὶ προχοῇσι Κίοιο 1.1322. πέπρωται Μυσοῖσι περικλεὲς ἄστυ καμόντα 1.1323. μοῖραν ἀναπλήσειν Χαλύβων ἐν ἀπείρονι γαίῃ. 1.1324. αὐτὰρ Ὕλαν φιλότητι θεὰ ποιήσατο νύμφη 1.1325. ὃν πόσιν, οἷό περ οὕνεκʼ ἀποπλαγχθέντες ἔλειφθεν.’ 1.1326. ἦ, καὶ κῦμʼ ἀλίαστον ἐφέσσατο νειόθι δύψας· 1.1327. ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ δίνῃσι κυκώμενον ἄφρεεν ὕδωρ 1.1328. πορφύρεον, κοίλην δὲ διὲξ ἁλὸς ἔκλυσε νῆα. 1.1329. γήθησαν δʼ ἥρωες· ὁ δʼ ἐσσυμένως ἐβεβήκει 1.1330. Αἰακίδης Τελαμὼν ἐς Ἰήσονα, χεῖρα δὲ χειρὶ 1.1331. ἄκρην ἀμφιβαλὼν προσπτύξατο, φώνησέν τε· 1.1332. ‘Αἰσονίδη, μή μοί τι χολώσεαι, ἀφραδίῃσιν 1.1333. εἴ τί περ ἀασάμην· πέρι γάρ μʼ ἄχος εἷλεν ἐνισπεῖν 1.1334. μῦθον ὑπερφίαλόν τε καὶ ἄσχετον, ἀλλʼ ἀνέμοισιν 1.1335. δώομεν ἀμπλακίην, ὡς καὶ πάρος εὐμενέοντες.’ 1.1336. τὸν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἐπιφραδέως προσέειπεν· 1.1337. ‘ὦ πέπον, ἦ μάλα δή με κακῷ ἐκυδάσσαο μύθῳ 1.1338. φὰς ἐνὶ τοῖσιν ἅπασιν ἐνηέος ἀνδρὸς ἀλείτην 1.1339. ἔμμεναι. ἀλλʼ οὐ θήν τοι ἀδευκέα μῆνιν ἀέξω 1.1340. πρίν περ ἀνιηθείς· ἐπεὶ οὐ περὶ πώεσι μήλων 1.1341. οὐδὲ περὶ κτεάτεσσι χαλεψάμενος μενέηνας 1.1342. ἀλλʼ ἑτάρου περὶ φωτός. ἔολπα δέ τοι σὲ καὶ ἄλλῳ 1.1343. ἀμφʼ ἐμεῦ, εἰ τοιόνδε πέλοι ποτέ, δηρίσασθαι.’ 1.1344. ἦ ῥα, καὶ ἀρθμηθέντες, ὅπῃ πάρος, ἑδριόωντο. 2.1. ἔνθα δʼ ἔσαν σταθμοί τε βοῶν αὖλίς τʼ Ἀμύκοιο 2.2. Βεβρύκων βασιλῆος ἀγήνορος, ὅν ποτε νύμφη 2.3. τίκτε Ποσειδάωνι Γενεθλίῳ εὐνηθεῖσα 2.4. Βιθυνὶς Μελίη, ὑπεροπληέστατον ἀνδρῶν· 2.5. ὅς τʼ ἐπὶ καὶ ξείνοισιν ἀεικέα θεσμὸν ἔθηκεν 2.6. μήτινʼ ἀποστείχειν, πρὶν πειρήσασθαι ἑοῖο 2.7. πυγμαχίης· πολέας δὲ περικτιόνων ἐδάιξεν. 2.8. καὶ δὲ τότε προτὶ νῆα κιών, χρειώ μιν ἐρέσθαι 2.9. ναυτιλίης, οἵ τʼ εἶεν, ὑπερβασίῃσιν ἄτισσεν 2.10. τοῖον δʼ ἐν πάντεσσι παρασχεδὸν ἔκφατο μῦθον· 2.11. ‘Κέκλυθʼ, ἁλίπλαγκτοι, τάπερ ἴδμεναι ὔμμιν ἔοικεν. 2.12. οὔτινα θέσμιόν ἐστιν ἀφορμηθέντα νέεσθαι 2.13. ἀνδρῶν ὀθνείων, ὅς κεν Βέβρυξι πελάσσῃ 2.14. πρὶν χείρεσσιν ἐμῇσιν ἑὰς ἀνὰ χεῖρας ἀεῖραι. 2.15. τῶ καί μοι τὸν ἄριστον ἀποκριδὸν οἶον ὁμίλου 2.16. πυγμαχίῃ στήσασθε καταυτόθι δηρινθῆναι. 2.17. εἰ δʼ ἂν ἀπηλεγέοντες ἐμὰς πατέοιτε θέμιστας 2.18. ἧ κέν τις στυγερῶς κρατερὴ ἐπιέψετʼ ἀνάγκη.’ 2.19. ἦ ῥα μέγα φρονέων· τοὺς δʼ ἄγριος εἰσαΐοντας 2.20. εἷλε χόλος· περὶ δʼ αὖ Πολυδεύκεα τύψεν ὁμοκλη 2.21. αἶψα δʼ ἑῶν ἑτάρων πρόμος ἵστατο, φώνησέν τε· 2.22. ‘ἴσχεο νῦν, μηδʼ ἄμμι κακήν, ὅτις εὔχεαι εἶναι 2.23. φαῖνε βίην· θεσμοῖς γὰρ ὑπείξομεν, ὡς ἀγορεύεις. 2.24. αὐτὸς ἑκὼν ἤδη τοι ὑπίσχομαι ἀντιάασθαι.’ 2.25. ὧς φάτʼ ἀπηλεγέως· ὁ δʼ ἐσέδρακεν ὄμμαθʼ ἑλίξας 2.26. ὥστε λέων ὑπʼ ἄκοντι τετυμμένος, ὅν τʼ ἐν ὄρεσσιν 2.27. ἀνέρες ἀμφιπένονται· ὁ δʼ ἰλλόμενός περ ὁμίλῳ 2.28. τῶν μὲν ἔτʼ οὐκ ἀλέγει, ἐπὶ δʼ ὄσσεται οἰόθεν οἶον 2.29. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς μιν ἔτυψε παροίτατος, οὐδʼ ἐδάμασσεν. 3.304. ‘παιδὸς ἐμῆς κοῦροι Φρίξοιό τε, τὸν περὶ πάντων 3.316. ἀνέρες, ὅππῃ τε γλαφυρῆς ἐκ νηὸς ἔβητε.’ 3.332. χρειὼ δʼ ἢν ἐθέλῃς ἐξίδμεναι, οὔ σʼ ἐπικεύσω. 3.333. τόνδε τις ἱέμενος πάτρης ἀπάνευθεν ἐλάσσαι 3.334. καὶ κτεάνων βασιλεὺς περιώσιον, οὕνεκεν ἀλκῇ 3.335. σφωιτέρῃ τάντεσσι μετέπρεπεν Αἰολίδῃσιν 3.336. πέμπει δεῦρο νέεσθαι ἀμήχανον· οὐδʼ ὑπαλύξειν 3.366. ἀθανάτων υἷές τε καὶ υἱωνοὶ γεγάασιν.’ 3.367. τοῖα παρέννεπεν Ἄργος· ἄναξ δʼ ἐπεχώσατο μύθοις 3.368. εἰσαΐων· ὑψοῦ δὲ χόλῳ φρένες ἠερέθοντο. 3.369. φῆ δʼ ἐπαλαστήσας· μενέαινε δὲ παισὶ μάλιστα 3.370. Χαλκιόπης· τῶν γάρ σφε μετελθέμεν οὕνεκʼ ἐώλπει· 3.371. ἐκ δέ οἱ ὄμματʼ ἔλαμψεν ὑπʼ ὀφρύσιν ἱεμένοιο· 3.372. ‘οὐκ ἄφαρ ὀφθαλμῶν μοι ἀπόπροθι, λωβητῆρες 3.373. νεῖσθʼ αὐτοῖσι δόλοισι παλίσσυτοι ἔκτοθι γαίης 3.374. πρίν τινα λευγαλέον τε δέρος καὶ Φρίξον ἰδέσθαι; 3.375. αὐτίχʼ ὁμαρτήσαντες ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος, οὐκ ἐπὶ κῶας 3.376. σκῆπτρα δὲ καὶ τιμὴν βασιληίδα δεῦρο νέεσθε. 3.377. εἰ δέ κε μὴ προπάροιθεν ἐμῆς ἥψασθε τραπέζης 3.378. ἦ τʼ ἂν ἀπὸ γλώσσας τε ταμὼν καὶ χεῖρε κεάσσας 3.379. ἀμφοτέρας, οἴοισιν ἐπιπροέηκα πόδεσσιν 3.380. ὥς κεν ἐρητύοισθε καὶ ὕστερον ὁρμηθῆναι 3.381. οἷα δὲ καὶ μακάρεσσιν ἐπεψεύσασθε θεοῖσιν.’ 3.382. φῆ ῥα χαλεψάμενος· μέγα δὲ φρένες Αἰακίδαο 3.383. νειόθεν οἰδαίνεσκον· ἐέλδετο δʼ ἔνδοθι θυμὸς 3.384. ἀντιβίην ὀλοὸν φάσθαι ἔπος· ἀλλʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.385. Αἰσονίδης· πρὸ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἀμείψατο μειλιχίοισιν· 3.580. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς ῥʼ ὑπέδεκτο βαρὺν καμέεσθαι ἄεθλον 3.581. δρυμὸν ἀναρρήξας λασίης καθύπερθε· κολώνης 3.582. αὔτανδρον φλέξειν δόρυ νήιον, ὄφρʼ ἀλεγεινὴν 3.583. ὕβριν ἀποφλύξωσιν ὑπέρβια μηχανόωντες. 3.584. οὐδὲ γὰρ Αἰολίδην Φρίξον μάλα περ χατέοντα 3.585. δέχθαι ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἐφέστιον, ὃς περὶ πάντων 3.586. ξείνων μελιχίῃ τε θεουδείῃ τʼ ἐκέκαστο 3.587. εἰ μή οἱ Ζεὺς αὐτὸς ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ ἄγγελον ἧκεν 3.588. Ἑρμείαν, ὥς κεν προσκηδέος ἀντιάσειεν· 3.594. νόσφι δὲ οἷ αὐτῷ φάτʼ ἐοικότα μείλια τίσειν 3.595. υἱῆας Φρίξοιο, κακορρέκτῃσιν ὀπηδοὺς 3.596. ἀνδράσι νοστήσαντας ὁμιλαδόν, ὄφρα ἑ τιμῆς 3.597. καὶ σκήπτρων ἐλάσειαν ἀκηδέες· ὥς ποτε βάξιν 3.598. λευγαλέην οὗ πατρὸς ἐπέκλυεν Ἠελίοιο 3.599. χρειώ μιν πυκινόν τε δόλον βουλάς τε γενέθλης 3.600. σφωιτέρης ἄτην τε πολύτροπον ἐξαλέασθαι· 4.1. αὐτὴ νῦν κάματόν γε, θεά, καὶ δήνεα κούρης 4.2. Κολχίδος ἔννεπε, Μοῦσα, Διὸς τέκος. ἦ γὰρ ἔμοιγε 4.3. ἀμφασίῃ νόος ἔνδον ἑλίσσεται ὁρμαίνοντι 4.4. ἢ ἔμεν ἄτης πῆμα δυσίμερον, ἦ τόγʼ ἐνίσπω 4.5. φύζαν ἀεικελίην, ᾗ κάλλιπεν ἔθνεα Κόλχων. 4.11. τῇ δʼ ἀλεγεινότατον κραδίῃ φόβον ἔμβαλεν Ἥρη· 4.12. τρέσσεν δʼ, ἠύτε τις κούφη κεμάς, ἥν τε βαθείης 4.13. τάρφεσιν ἐν ξυλόχοιο κυνῶν ἐφόβησεν ὁμοκλή. 4.14. αὐτίκα γὰρ νημερτὲς ὀίσσατο, μή μιν ἀρωγὴν 4.15. ληθέμεν, αἶψα δὲ πᾶσαν ἀναπλήσειν κακότητα. 4.16. τάρβει δʼ ἀμφιπόλους ἐπιίστορας· ἐν δέ οἱ ὄσσε 4.17. πλῆτο πυρός, δεινὸν δὲ περιβρομέεσκον ἀκουαί. 4.18. πυκνὰ δὲ λευκανίης ἐπεμάσσατο, πυκνὰ δὲ κουρὶξ 4.19. ἑλκομένη πλοκάμους γοερῇ βρυχήσατʼ ἀνίῃ. 4.20. καί νύ κεν αὐτοῦ τῆμος ὑπὲρ μόρον ὤλετο κούρη 4.21. φάρμακα πασσαμένη, Ἥρης δʼ ἁλίωσε μενοινάς 4.22. εἰ μή μιν Φρίξοιο θεὰ σὺν παισὶ φέβεσθαι 4.23. ὦρσεν ἀτυζομένην· πτερόεις δέ οἱ ἐν φρεσὶ θυμὸς 4.24. ἰάνθη· μετὰ δʼ ἥγε παλίσσυτος ἀθρόα κόλπων 4.25. φάρμακα πάντʼ ἄμυδις κατεχεύατο φωριαμοῖο. 4.32. χαίροις Χαλκιόπη, καὶ πᾶς δόμος. αἴθε σε πόντος 4.33. ξεῖνε, διέρραισεν, πρὶν Κολχίδα γαῖαν ἱκέσθαι.’ 4.35. οἵη δʼ ἀφνειοῖο διειλυσθεῖσα δόμοιο 4.36. ληιάς, ἥν τε νέον πάτρης ἀπενόσφισεν αἶσα 4.37. οὐδέ νύ πω μογεροῖο πεπείρηται καμάτοιο 4.38. ἀλλʼ ἔτʼ ἀηθέσσουσα δύης καὶ δούλια ἔργα 4.39. εἶσιν ἀτυζομενη χαλεπὰς ὑπὸ χεῖρας ἀνάσσης· 4.40. τοίη ἄρʼ ἱμερόεσσα δόμων ἐξέσσυτο κούρη. 4.41. τῇ δὲ καὶ αὐτόματοι θυρέων ἱπόειξαν ὀχῆες 4.42. ὠκείαις ἄψορροι ἀναθρώσκοντες ἀοιδαῖς. 4.43. γυμνοῖσιν δὲ πόδεσσιν ἀνὰ στεινὰς θέεν οἴμους 4.44. λαιῇ μὲν χερὶ πέπλον ἐπʼ ὀφρύσιν ἀμφὶ μέτωπα 4.45. στειλαμένη καὶ καλὰ παρήια, δεξιτερῇ δὲ 4.46. ἄκρην ὑψόθι πέζαν ἀερτάζουσα χιτῶνος. 4.47. καρπαλίμως δʼ ἀίδηλον ἀνὰ στίβον ἔκτοθι πύργων 4.48. ἄστεος εὐρυχόροιο φόβῳ ἵκετʼ· οὐδέ τις ἔγνω 4.49. τήνγε φυλακτήρων, λάθε δέ σφεας ὁρμηθεῖσα. 4.50. ἔνθεν ἴμεν νηόνδε μάλʼ ἐφράσατʼ· οὐ γὰρ ἄιδρις 4.51. ἦεν ὁδῶν, θαμὰ καὶ πρὶν ἀλωμένη ἀμφί τε νεκρούς 4.52. ἀμφί τε δυσπαλέας ῥίζας χθονός, οἷα γυναῖκες 4.53. φαρμακίδες· τρομερῷ δʼ ὑπὸ δείματι πάλλετο θυμός. 4.54. τὴν δὲ νέον Τιτηνὶς ἀνερχομένη περάτηθεν 4.55. φοιταλέην ἐσιδοῦσα θεὰ ἐπεχήρατο Μήνη 4.56. ἁρπαλέως, καὶ τοῖα μετὰ φρεσὶν ᾗσιν ἔειπεν· 4.57. ‘οὐκ ἄρʼ ἐγὼ μούνη μετὰ Λάτμιον ἄντρον ἀλύσκω 4.58. οὐδʼ οἴη καλῷ περιδαίομαι Ἐνδυμίωνι· 4.59. ἦ θαμὰ δὴ καὶ σεῖο κίον δολίῃσιν ἀοιδαῖς 4.60. μνησαμένη φιλότητος, ἵνα σκοτίῃ ἐνὶ νυκτὶ 4.61. φαρμάσσῃς εὔκηλος, ἅ τοι φίλα ἔργα τέτυκται. 4.62. νῦν δὲ καὶ αὐτὴ δῆθεν ὁμοίης ἔμμορες ἄτης· 4.63. δῶκε δʼ ἀνιηρόν τοι Ἰήσονα πῆμα γενέσθαι 4.64. δαίμων ἀλγινόεις. ἀλλʼ ἔρχεο, τέτλαθι δʼ ἔμπης 4.65. καὶ πινυτή περ ἐοῦσα, πολύστονον ἄλγος ἀείρειν.’ 4.66. ὦς ἄρʼ ἔφη· τὴν δʼ αἶψα πόδες φέρον ἐγκονέουσαν. 4.67. ἀσπασίως δʼ ὄχθῃσιν ἐπηέρθη ποταμοῖο 4.68. ἀντιπέρην λεύσσουσα πυρὸς σέλας, ὅ ῥά τʼ ἀέθλου 4.69. παννύχιοι ἥρωες ἐυφροσύνῃσιν ἔδαιον. 4.70. ὀξείῃ δἤπειτα διὰ κνέφας ὄρθια φωνῇ 4.71. ὁπλότατον Φρίξοιο περαιόθεν ἤπυε παίδων 4.72. φρόντιν· ὁ δὲ ξὺν ἑοῖσι κασιγνήτοις ὄπα κούρης 4.73. αὐτῷ τʼ Αἰσονίδῃ τεκμήρατο· σῖγα δʼ ἑταῖροι 4.74. θάμβεον, εὖτʼ ἐνόησαν ὃ δὴ καὶ ἐτήτυμον ἦεν. 4.75. τρὶς μὲν ἀνήυσεν, τρὶς δʼ ὀτρύνοντος ὁμίλου 4.76. Φρόντις ἀμοιβήδην ἀντίαχεν· οἱ δʼ ἄρα τείως 4.77. ἥρωες μετὰ τήνγε θοοῖς ἐλάασκον ἐρετμοῖς. 4.78. οὔπω πείσματα νηὸς ἐπʼ ἠπείροιο περαίης 4.79. βάλλον, ὁ δὲ κραιπνοὺς χέρσῳ πόδας ἧκεν Ἰήσων 4.80. ὑψοῦ ἀπʼ ἰκριόφιν· μετὰ δὲ Φρόντις τε καὶ Ἄργος 4.81. υἷε δύω Φρίξου, χαμάδις θόρον· ἡ δʼ ἄρα τούσγε 4.99. ὧς ηὔδα, καὶ χεῖρα παρασχεδὸν ἤραρε χειρὶ 4.121. Ἑρμείας πρόφρων ξυμβλήμενος. ἔνθʼ ἄρα τούσγε 4.123. τὼ δὲ διʼ ἀτραπιτοῖο μεθʼ ἱερὸν ἄλσος ἵκοντο 4.124. φηγὸν ἀπειρεσίην διζημένω, ᾗ ἔπι κῶας 4.125. βέβλητο, νεφέλῃ ἐναλίγκιον, ἥ τʼ ἀνιόντος 4.126. ἠελίου φλογερῇσιν ἐρεύθεται ἀκτίνεσσιν. 4.127. αὐτὰρ ὁ ἀντικρὺ περιμήκεα τείνετο δειρὴν 4.128. ὀξὺς ἀύπνοισιν προϊδὼν ὄφις ὀφθαλμοῖσιν 4.129. νισσομένους, ῥοίζει δὲ πελώριον· ἀμφὶ δὲ μακραὶ 4.130. ἠιόνες ποταμοῖο καὶ ἄσπετον ἴαχεν ἄλσος. 4.131. ἔκλυον οἳ καὶ πολλὸν ἑκὰς Τιτηνίδος Αἴης 4.132. Κολχίδα γῆν ἐνέμοντο παρὰ προχοῇσι Λύκοιο 4.133. ὅς τʼ ἀποκιδνάμενος ποταμοῦ κελάδοντος Ἀράξεω 4.134. Φάσιδι συμφέρεται ἱερὸν ῥόον· οἱ δὲ συνάμφω 4.135. Καυκασίην ἅλαδʼ εἰς ἓν ἐλαυνόμενοι προχέουσιν. 4.136. δείματι δʼ ἐξέγροντο λεχωίδες, ἀμφὶ δὲ παισὶν 4.137. νηπιάχοις, οἵ τέ σφιν ὑπʼ ἀγκαλίδεσσιν ἴαυον 4.138. ῥοίζῳ παλλομένοις χεῖρας βάλον ἀσχαλόωσαι. 4.139. ὡς δʼ ὅτε τυφομένης ὕλης ὕπερ αἰθαλόεσσαι 4.140. καπνοῖο στροφάλιγγες ἀπείριτοι εἱλίσσονται 4.141. ἄλλη δʼ αἶψʼ ἑτέρῃ ἐπιτέλλεται αἰὲν ἐπιπρὸ 4.142. νειόθεν εἰλίγγοισιν ἐπήορος ἐξανιοῦσα· 4.143. ὧς τότε κεῖνο πέλωρον ἀπειρεσίας ἐλέλιξεν 4.144. ῥυμβόνας ἀζαλέῃσιν ἐπηρεφέας φολίδεσσιν. 4.145. τοῖο δʼ ἑλισσομένοιο κατʼ ὄμματα νίσσετο κούρη 4.146. ὕπνον ἀοσσητῆρα, θεῶν ὕπατον, καλέουσα 4.147. ἡδείῃ ἐνοπῇ, θέλξαι τέρας· αὖε δʼ ἄνασσαν 4.148. νυκτιπόλον, χθονίην, εὐαντέα δοῦναι ἐφορμήν. 4.149. εἵπετο δʼ Αἰσονίδης πεφοβημένος, αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ ἤδη 4.150. οἴμῃ θελγόμενος δολιχὴν ἀνελύετʼ ἄκανθαν 4.151. γηγενέος σπείρης, μήκυνε δὲ μυρία κύκλα 4.152. οἷον ὅτε βληχροῖσι κυλινδόμενον πελάγεσσιν 4.153. κῦμα μέλαν κωφόν τε καὶ ἄβρομον· ἀλλὰ καὶ ἔμπης 4.154. ὑψοῦ σμερδαλέην κεφαλὴν μενέαινεν ἀείρας 4.155. ἀμφοτέρους ὀλοῇσι περιπτύξαι γενύεσσιν. 4.156. ἡ δέ μιν ἀρκεύθοιο νέον τετμηότι θαλλῷ 4.157. βάπτουσʼ ἐκ κυκεῶνος ἀκήρατα φάρμακʼ ἀοιδαῖς 4.158. ῥαῖνε κατʼ ὀφθαλμῶν· περί τʼ ἀμφί τε νήριτος ὀδμὴ 4.159. φαρμάκου ὕπνον ἔβαλλε· γένυν δʼ αὐτῇ ἐνὶ χώρῃ 4.160. θῆκεν ἐρεισάμενος· τὰ δʼ ἀπείρονα πολλὸν ὀπίσσω 4.161. κύκλα πολυπρέμνοιο διὲξ ὕλης τετάνυστο. 4.162. ἔνθα δʼ ὁ μὲν χρύσειον ἀπὸ δρυὸς αἴνυτο κῶας 4.163. κούρης κεκλομένης· ἡ δʼ ἔμπεδον ἑστηυῖα 4.164. φαρμάκῳ ἔψηχεν θηρὸς κάρη, εἰσόκε δή μιν 4.165. αὐτὸς ἑὴν ἐπὶ νῆα παλιντροπάασθαι Ἰήσων 4.166. ἤνωγεν, λεῖπεν δὲ πολύσκιον ἄλσος Ἄρηος. 4.167. ὡς δὲ σεληναίην διχομήνιδα παρθένος αἴγλην 4.168. ὑψόθεν ἐξανέχουσαν ὑπωροφίου θαλάμοιο 4.169. λεπταλέῳ ἑανῷ ὑποΐσχεται· ἐν δέ οἱ ἦτορ 4.170. χαίρει δερκομένης καλὸν σέλας· ὧς τότʼ Ἰήσων 4.171. γηθόσυνος μέγα κῶας ἑαῖς ἐναείρατο χερσίν· 4.172. καί οἱ ἐπὶ ξανθῇσι παρηίσιν ἠδὲ μετώπῳ 4.173. μαρμαρυγῇ ληνέων φλογὶ εἴκελον ἷζεν ἔρευθος. 4.174. ὅσση δὲ ῥινὸς βοὸς ἤνιος ἢ ἐλάφοιο 4.175. γίγνεται, ἥν τʼ ἀγρῶσται ἀχαιινέην καλέουσιν 4.176. τόσσον ἔην πάντῃ χρύσεον ἐφύπερθεν ἄωτον. 4.177. βεβρίθει λήνεσσιν ἐπηρεφές· ἤλιθα δὲ χθὼν 4.178. αἰὲν ὑποπρὸ ποδῶν ἀμαρύσσετο νισσομένοιο. 4.179. ἤιε δʼ ἄλλοτε μὲν λαιῷ ἐπιειμένος ὤμῳ 4.180. αὐχένος ἐξ ὑπάτοιο ποδηνεκές, ἄλλοτε δʼ αὖτε 4.181. εἴλει ἀφασσόμενος· περὶ γὰρ δίεν, ὄφρα ἓ μή τις 4.182. ἀνδρῶν ἠὲ θεῶν νοσφίσσεται ἀντιβολήσας. 4.184. ἷξον· θάμβησαν δὲ νέοι μέγα κῶας ἰδόντες 4.185. λαμπόμενον στεροπῇ ἴκελον Διός. ὦρτο δʼ ἕκαστος 4.186. ψαῦσαι ἐελδόμενος δέχθαι τʼ ἐνὶ χερσὶν ἑῇσιν. 4.194. τὴν μὲν ἐγὼν ἐθέλουσαν ἀνάξομαι οἴκαδʼ ἄκοιτιν 4.195. κουριδίην· ἀτὰρ ὔμμες Ἀχαιίδος οἷά τε πάσης 4.198. Αἰήτης ὁμάδῳ πόντονδʼ ἴμεν ἐκ ποταμοῖο. 4.212. ἤδη δʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι πᾶσί τε Κόλχοις 4.213. Μηδείης περίπυστος ἔρως καὶ ἔργʼ ἐτέτυκτο. 4.214. ἐς δʼ ἀγορὴν ἀγέροντʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσιν· ὅσσα δέ πόντου 4.215. κύματα χειμερίοιο κορύσσεται ἐξ ἀνέμοιο 4.216. ἢ ὅσα φύλλα χαμᾶζε περικλαδέος πέσεν ὕλης 4.217. φυλλοχόῳ ἐνὶ μηνί--τίς ἂν τάδε τεκμήραιτο; 4.218. ὧς οἱ ἀπειρέσιοι ποταμοῦ παρεμέτρεον ὄχθας 4.219. κλαγγῇ μαιμώοντες· ὁ δʼ εὐτύκτῳ ἐνὶ δίφρῳ 4.220. Αἰήτης ἵπποισι μετέπρεπεν, οὕς οἱ ὄπασσεν 4.221. ἠέλιος πνοιῇσιν ἐειδομένους ἀνέμοιο 4.222. σκαιῇ μέν ῥ̓ ἐνὶ χειρὶ σάκος δινωτὸν ἀείρων 4.223. τῇ δʼ ἑτέρῃ πεύκην περιμήκεα· πὰρ δέ οἱ ἔγχος 4.224. ἀντικρὺ τετάνυστο πελώριον. ἡνία δʼ ἵππων 4.225. γέντο χεροῖν Ἄψυρτος. υπεκπρὸ δὲ πόντον ἔταμνεν 4.226. νηῦς ἤδη κρατεροῖσιν ἐπειγομένη ἐρέτῃσιν 4.227. καὶ μεγάλου ποταμοῖο καταβλώσκοντι ῥεέθρῳ. 4.228. αὐτὰρ ἄναξ ἄτῃ πολυπήμονι χεῖρας ἀείρας 4.229. ἠέλιον καὶ Ζῆνα κακῶν ἐπιμάρτυρας ἔργων 4.231. εἰ μή οἱ κούρην αὐτάγρετον, ἢ ἀνὰ γαῖαν 4.232. ἢ πλωτῆς εὑρόντες ἔτʼ εἰν ἁλὸς οἴδματι νῆα 4.233. ἄξουσιν, καὶ θυμὸν ἐνιπλήσει μενεαίνων 4.234. τίσασθαι τάδε πάντα, δαήσονται κεφαλῇσιν 4.235. πάντα χόλον καὶ πᾶσαν ἑὴν ὑποδέγμενοι ἄτην. 4.236. ὧς ἔφατʼ Αἰήτης· αὐτῷ δʼ ἐνὶ ἤματι Κόλχοι 4.237. νῆάς τʼ εἰρύσσαντο, καὶ ἄρμενα νηυσὶ βάλοντο 4.238. αὐτῷ δʼ ἤματι πόντον ἀνήιον· οὐδέ κε φαίης 4.239. τόσσον νηίτην στόλον ἔμμεναι, ἀλλʼ οἰωνῶν 4.240. ἰλαδὸν ἄσπετον ἔθνος ἐπιβρομέειν πελάγεσσιν. 4.241. οἱ δʼ ἀνέμου λαιψηρὰ θεᾶς βουλῇσιν ἀέντος 4.242. Ἥρης, ὄφρʼ ὤκιστα κακὸν Πελίαο δόμοισιν 4.243. Αἰαίη Μήδεια Πελασγίδα γαῖαν ἵκηται 4.244. ἠοῖ ἐνὶ τριτάτῃ πρυμνήσια νηὸς ἔδησαν 4.245. Παφλαγόνων ἀκτῇσι, πάροιθʼ Ἅλυος ποταμοῖο. 4.246. ἡ γάρ σφʼ ἐξαποβάντας ἀρέσσασθαι θυέεσσιν 4.247. ἠνώγει Ἑκάτην. καὶ δὴ τὰ μέν, ὅσσα θυηλὴν 4.248. κούρη πορσανέουσα τιτύσκετο, μήτε τις ἴστωρ 4.249. εἴη, μήτʼ ἐμὲ θυμὸς ἐποτρύνειεν ἀείδειν. 4.250. ἅζομαι αὐδῆσαι· τό γε μὴν ἕδος ἐξέτι κείνου 4.251. ὅ ῥα θεᾷ ἥρωες ἐπὶ ῥηγμῖσιν ἔδειμαν 4.252. ἀνδράσιν ὀψιγόνοισι μένει καὶ τῆμος ἰδέσθαι. 4.253. αὐτίκα δʼ Αἰσονίδης ἐμνήσατο, σὺν δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι 4.254. ἥρωες, Φινῆος, ὃ δὴ πλόον ἄλλον ἔειπεν 4.255. ἐξ Αἴης ἔσσεσθαι· ἀνώιστος δʼ ἐτέτυκτο 4.256. πᾶσιν ὁμῶς. Ἄργος δὲ λιλαιομένοις ἀγόρευσεν· 4.257. ‘Νισσόμεθʼ Ὀρχομενὸν τὴν ἔχραεν ὔμμι περῆσαι 4.258. νημερτὴς ὅδε μάντις, ὅτῳ ξυνέβητε πάροιθεν. 4.259. ἔστιν γὰρ πλόος ἄλλος, ὃν ἀθανάτων ἱερῆες 4.260. πέφραδον, οἳ Θήβης Τριτωνίδος ἐκγεγάασιν. 4.261. οὔπω τείρεα πάντα, τά τʼ οὐρανῷ εἱλίσσονται 4.262. οὐδέ τί πω Δαναῶν ἱερὸν γένος ἦεν ἀκοῦσαι 4.263. πευθομένοις· οἶοι δʼ ἔσαν Ἀρκάδες Ἀπιδανῆες 4.264. Ἀρκάδες, οἳ καὶ πρόσθε σεληναίης ὑδέονται 4.265. ζώειν, φηγὸν ἔδοντες ἐν οὔρεσιν. οὐδὲ Πελασγὶς 4.266. χθὼν τότε κυδαλίμοισιν ἀνάσσετο Δευκαλίδῃσιν 4.267. ἦμος ὅτʼ Ἠερίη πολυλήιος ἐκλήιστο 4.268. μήτηρ Αἴγυπτος προτερηγενέων αἰζηῶν 4.269. καὶ ποταμὸς Τρίτων ἠύρροος, ᾧ ὕπο πᾶσα 4.270. ἄρδεται Ἠερίη· Διόθεν δέ μιν οὔποτε δεύει 4.271. ὄμβρος· ἅλις προχοῇσι δʼ ἀνασταχύουσιν ἄρουραι. 4.272. ἔνθεν δή τινά φασι πέριξ διὰ πᾶσαν ὁδεῦσαι 4.273. Εὐρώπην Ἀσίην τε βίῃ καὶ κάρτεϊ λαῶν 4.274. σφωιτέρων θάρσει τε πεποιθότα· μυρία δʼ ἄστη 4.275. νάσσατʼ ἐποιχόμενος, τὰ μὲν ἤ ποθι ναιετάουσιν 4.276. ἠὲ καὶ οὔ· πουλὺς γὰρ ἄδην ἐπενήνοθεν αἰών. 4.277. αἶά γε μὴν ἔτι νῦν μένει ἔμπεδον υἱωνοί τε 4.278. τῶνδʼ ἀνδρῶν, οὓς ὅσγε καθίσσατο ναιέμεν Αἶαν 4.279. οἳ δή τοι γραπτῦς πατέρων ἕθεν εἰρύονται 4.280. κύρβιας, οἷς ἔνι πᾶσαι ὁδοὶ καὶ πείρατʼ ἔασιν 4.281. ὑγρῆς τε τραφερῆς τε πέριξ ἐπινισσομένοισιν. 4.282. ἔστι δέ τις ποταμός, ὕπατον κέρας Ὠκεανοῖο 4.283. εὐρύς τε προβαθής τε καὶ ὁλκάδι νηὶ περῆσαι· 4.284. Ἴστρον μιν καλέοντες ἑκὰς διετεκμήραντο· 4.285. ὅς δή τοι τείως μὲν ἀπείρονα τέμνετʼ ἄρουραν 4.286. εἷς οἶος· πηγαὶ γὰρ ὑπὲρ πνοιῆς βορέαο 4.287. Ῥιπαίοις ἐν ὄρεσσιν ἀπόπροθι μορμύρουσιν. 4.288. ἀλλʼ ὁπόταν Θρῃκῶν Σκυθέων τʼ ἐπιβήσεται οὔρους 4.289. ἔνθα διχῆ τὸ μὲν ἔνθα μετʼ ἠῴην ἅλα βάλλει 4.290. τῇδʼ ὕδωρ, τὸ δʼ ὄπισθε βαθὺν διὰ κόλπον ἵησιν 4.291. σχιζόμενος πόντου Τρινακρίου εἰσανέχοντα 4.292. γαίῃ ὃς ὑμετέρῃ παρακέκλιται, εἰ ἐτεὸν δὴ 4.293. ὑμετέρης γαίης Ἀχελώιος ἐξανίησιν.’ 4.294. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· τοῖσιν δὲ θεὰ τέρας ἐγγυάλιξεν 4.295. αἴσιον, ᾧ καὶ πάντες ἐπευφήμησαν ἰδόντες 4.296. στέλλεσθαι τήνδʼ οἶμον. ἐπιπρὸ γὰρ ὁλκὸς ἐτύχθη 4.297. οὐρανίης ἀκτῖνος, ὅπῃ καὶ ἀμεύσιμον ἦεν. 4.303. Κόλχοι δʼ αὖτʼ ἄλλοι μέν, ἐτώσια μαστεύοντες 4.304. Κυανέας Πόντοιο διὲκ πέτρας ἐπέρησαν· 4.305. ἄλλοι δʼ αὖ ποταμὸν μετεκίαθον, οἷσιν ἄνασσεν 4.306. Ἄψυρτος, Καλὸν δὲ διὰ στόμα πεῖρε λιασθείς. 4.307. τῶ καὶ ὑπέφθη τούσγε βαλὼν ὕπερ αὐχένα γαίης 4.308. κόλπον ἔσω πόντοιο πανέσχατον Ἰονίοιο. 4.309. Ἴστρῳ γάρ τις νῆσος ἐέργεται οὔνομα Πεύκη 4.310. τριγλώχιν, εὖρος μὲν ἐς αἰγιαλοὺς ἀνέχουσα 4.311. στεινὸν δʼ αὖτʼ ἀγκῶνα ποτὶ ῥόον· ἀμφὶ δὲ δοιαὶ 4.312. σχίζονται προχοαί. τὴν μὲν καλέουσι Νάρηκος· 4.313. τὴν δʼ ὑπὸ τῇ νεάτῃ, Καλὸν στόμα. τῇ δὲ διαπρὸ 4.314. Ἄψυρτος Κόλχοι τε θοώτερον ὡρμήθησαν· 4.315. οἱ δʼ ὑψοῦ νήσοιο κατʼ ἀκροτάτης ἐνέοντο 4.316. τηλόθεν. εἱαμενῇσι δʼ ἐν ἄσπετα πώεα λεῖπον 4.323. αὐτὰρ ἐπεί τʼ Ἄγγουρον ὄρος, καὶ ἄπωθεν ἐόντα 4.324. Ἀγγούρου ὄρεος σκόπελον πάρα Καυλιακοῖο 4.325. ᾧ πέρι δὴ σχίζων Ἴστρος ῥόον ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα 4.326. βάλλει ἁλός, πεδίον τε τὸ Λαύριον ἠμείψαντο 4.327. δή ῥα τότε Κρονίην Κόλχοι ἅλαδʼ ἐκπρομολόντες 4.328. πάντῃ, μή σφε λάθοιεν, ὑπετμήξαντο κελεύθους. 4.329. οἱ δʼ ὄπιθεν ποταμοῖο κατήλυθον, ἐκ δʼ ἐπέρησαν 4.330. δοιὰς Ἀρτέμιδος Βρυγηίδας ἀγχόθι νήσους. 4.331. τῶν δʼ ἤτοι ἑτέρῃ μὲν ἐν ἱερὸν ἔσκεν ἔδεθλον· 4.332. ἐν??δʼ ἑτέρῃ, πληθὺν πεφυλαγμένοι Ἀψύρτοιο 4.333. βαῖνον· ἐπεὶ κείνας πολέων λίπον ἔνδοθι νήσους 4.334. αὔτως, ἁζόμενοι κούρην Διός· αἱ δὲ δὴ ἄλλαι 4.335. στεινόμεναι Κόλχοισι πόρους εἴρυντο θαλάσσης. 4.336. ὧς δὲ καὶ εἰς ἀκτὰς πληθὺν λίπεν ἀγχόθι νήσων 4.337. μέσφα Σαλαγγῶνος ποταμοῦ καὶ Νέστιδος αἴης. 4.338. ἔνθα κε λευγαλέῃ Μινύαι τότε δηιοτῆτι 4.339. παυρότεροι πλεόνεσσιν ὑπείκαθον· ἀλλὰ πάροιθεν 4.340. συνθεσίην, μέγα νεῖκος ἀλευάμενοι, ἐτάμοντο 4.341. κῶας μὲν χρύσειον, ἐπεί σφισιν αὐτὸς ὑπέστη 4.342. Αἰήτης, εἰ κεῖνοι ἀναπλήσειαν ἀέθλους 4.343. ἔμπεδον εὐδικίῃ σφέας ἑξέμεν, εἴτε δόλοισιν 4.344. εἴτε καὶ ἀμφαδίην αὔτως ἀέκοντος ἀπηύρων· 4.345. αὐτὰρ Μήδειάν γε--τὸ γὰρ πέλεν ἀμφήριστον-- 4.346. παρθέσθαι κούρῃ Λητωίδι νόσφιν ὁμίλου 4.347. εἰσόκε τις δικάσῃσι θεμιστούχων βασιλήων 4.348. εἴτε μιν εἰς πατρὸς χρειὼ δόμον αὖτις ἱκάνειν 4.349. εἴτε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἀριστήεσσιν ἕπεσθαι. 4.350. ἔνθα δʼ ἐπεὶ τὰ ἕκαστα νόῳ πεμπάσσατο κούρη 4.351. δή ῥά μιν ὀξεῖαι κραδίην ἐλέλιξαν ἀνῖαι 4.352. νωλεμές· αἶψα δὲ νόσφιν Ἰήσονα μοῦνον ἑταίρων 4.353. ἐκπροκαλεσσαμένη ἄγεν ἄλλυδις, ὄφρʼ ἐλίασθεν 4.354. πολλὸν ἑκάς, στονόεντα δʼ ἐνωπαδὶς ἔκφατο μῦθον· 4.355. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε συναρτύνασθε μενοινὴν 4.356. ἀμφʼ ἐμοί; ἦέ σε πάγχυ λαθιφροσύναις ἐνέηκαν 4.357. ἀγλαΐαι, τῶν δʼ οὔτι μετατρέπῃ, ὅσσʼ ἀγόρευες 4.358. χρειοῖ ἐνισχόμενος; ποῦ τοι Διὸς Ἱκεσίοιο 4.359. ὅρκια, ποῦ δὲ μελιχραὶ ὑποσχεσίαι βεβάασιν; 4.360. ᾗς ἐγὼ οὐ κατὰ κόσμον ἀναιδήτῳ ἰότητι 4.361. πάτρην τε κλέα τε μεγάρων αὐτούς τε τοκῆας 4.362. νοσφισάμην, τά μοι ἦεν ὑπέρτατα· τηλόθι δʼ οἴη 4.363. λυγρῇσιν κατὰ πόντον ἅμʼ ἀλκυόνεσσι φορεῦμαι 4.364. σῶν ἕνεκεν καμάτων, ἵνα μοι σόος ἀμφί τε βουσὶν 4.365. ἀμφί τε γηγενέεσσιν ἀναπλήσειας ἀέθλους. 4.366. ὕστατον αὖ καὶ κῶας, ἐπεί τʼ ἐπαϊστὸν ἐτύχθη 4.367. εἷλες ἐμῇ ματίῃ· κατὰ δʼ οὐλοὸν αἶσχος ἔχευα 4.368. θηλυτέραις. τῶ φημὶ τεὴ κούρη τε δάμαρ τε 4.369. αὐτοκασιγνήτη τε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἕπεσθαι. 4.370. πάντῃ νυν πρόφρων ὑπερίστασο, μηδέ με μούνην 4.371. σεῖο λίπῃς ἀπάνευθεν, ἐποιχόμενος βασιλῆας. 4.372. ἀλλʼ αὔτως εἴρυσο· δίκη δέ τοι ἔμπεδος ἔστω 4.373. καὶ θέμις, ἣν ἄμφω συναρέσσαμεν· ἢ σύγʼ ἔπειτα 4.374. φασγάνῳ αὐτίκα τόνδε μέσον διὰ λαιμὸν ἀμῆσαι 4.375. ὄφρʼ ἐπίηρα φέρωμαι ἐοικότα μαργοσύνῃσιν. 4.376. σχετλίη, εἴ κεν δή με κασιγνήτοιο δικάσσῃ 4.377. ἔμμεναι οὗτος ἄναξ, τῷ ἐπίσχετε τάσδʼ ἀλεγεινὰς 4.378. ἄμφω συνθεσίας. πῶς ἵξομαι ὄμματα πατρός; 4.379. ἦ μάλʼ ἐυκλειής; τίνα δʼ οὐ τίσιν, ἠὲ βαρεῖαν 4.380. ἄτην οὐ σμυγερῶς δεινῶν ὕπερ, οἷα ἔοργα 4.381. ὀτλήσω; σὺ δέ κεν θυμηδέα νόστον ἕλοιο; 4.382. μὴ τόγε παμβασίλεια Διὸς τελέσειεν ἄκοιτις 4.383. ᾗ ἐπικυδιάεις. μνήσαιο δέ καί ποτʼ ἐμεῖο 4.384. στρευγόμενος καμάτοισι· δέρος δέ τοι ἶσον ὀνείροις 4.385. οἴχοιτʼ εἰς ἔρεβος μεταμώνιον. ἐκ δέ σε πάτρης 4.386. αὐτίκʼ ἐμαί σʼ ἐλάσειαν Ἐρινύες· οἷα καὶ αὐτὴ 4.387. σῇ πάθον ἀτροπίῃ. τὰ μὲν οὐ θέμις ἀκράαντα 4.388. ἐν γαίῃ πεσέειν. μάλα γὰρ μέγαν ἤλιτες ὅρκον 4.389. νηλεές· ἀλλʼ οὔ θήν μοι ἐπιλλίζοντες ὀπίσσω 4.390. δὴν ἔσσεσθʼ εὔκηλοι ἕκητί γε συνθεσιάων.’ 4.391. ὧς φάτʼ ἀναζείουσα βαρὺν χόλον· ἵετο δʼ ἥγε 4.392. νῆα καταφλέξαι, διά τʼ ἔμπεδα πάντα κεάσσαι 4.393. ἐν δὲ πεσεῖν αὐτὴ μαλερῷ πυρί. τοῖα δʼ Ἰήσων 4.394. μειλιχίοις ἐπέεσσιν ὑποδδείσας προσέειπεν· 4.395. ‘ἴσχεο, δαιμονίη· τὰ μὲν ἁνδάνει οὐδʼ ἐμοὶ αὐτῷ. 4.396. ἀλλά τινʼ ἀμβολίην διζήμεθα δηιοτῆτος 4.397. ὅσσον δυσμενέων ἀνδρῶν νέφος ἀμφιδέδηεν 4.398. εἵνεκα σεῦ. πάντες γάρ, ὅσοι χθόνα τήνδε νέμονται 4.399. Ἀψύρτῳ μεμάασιν ἀμυνέμεν, ὄφρα σε πατρί 4.400. οἷά τε ληισθεῖσαν, ὑπότροπον οἴκαδʼ ἄγοιντο. 4.401. αὐτοὶ δὲ στυγερῷ κεν ὀλοίμεθα πάντες ὀλέθρῳ 4.402. μίξαντες δαῒ χεῖρας· ὅ τοι καὶ ῥίγιον ἄλγος 4.403. ἔσσεται, εἴ σε θανόντες ἕλωρ κείνοισι λίποιμεν. 4.404. ἥδε δὲ συνθεσίη κρανέει δόλον, ᾧ μιν ἐς ἄτην 4.405. βήσομεν. οὐδʼ ἂν ὁμῶς περιναιέται ἀντιόωσιν 4.406. Κόλχοις ἦρα φέροντες ὑπὲρ σέο νόσφιν ἄνακτος 4.407. ὅς τοι ἀοσσητήρ τε κασίγνητός τε τέτυκται· 4.408. οὐδʼ ἂν ἐγὼ Κόλχοισιν ὑπείξω μὴ πολεμίζειν 4.409. ἀντιβίην, ὅτε μή με διὲξ εἰῶσι νέεσθαι.’ 4.410. Ἴσκεν ὑποσσαίνων· ἡ δʼ οὐλοὸν ἔκφατο μῦθον· 4.411. ‘φράζεο νῦν. χρειὼ γὰρ ἀεικελίοισιν ἐπʼ ἔργοις 4.412. καὶ τόδε μητίσασθαι, ἐπεὶ τὸ πρῶτον ἀάσθην 4.413. ἀμπλακίῃ, θεόθεν δὲ κακὰς ἤνυσσα μενοινάς. 4.414. τύνη μὲν κατὰ μῶλον ἀλέξεο δούρατα Κόλχων· 4.415. αὐτὰρ ἐγὼ κεῖνόν γε τεὰς ἐς χεῖρας ἱκέσθαι 4.416. μειλίξω· σὺ δέ μιν φαιδροῖς ἀγαπάζεο δώροις. 4.417. εἴ κέν πως κήρυκας ἀπερχομένους πεπίθοιμι 4.418. οἰόθεν οἶον ἐμοῖσι συναρθμῆσαι ἐπέεσσιν 4.419. ἔνθʼ εἴ τοι τόδε ἔργον ἐφανδάνει, οὔτι μεγαίρω 4.420. κτεῖνέ τε, καὶ Κόλχοισιν ἀείρεο δηιοτῆτα.’ 4.421. ὧς τώγε ξυμβάντε μέγαν δόλον ἠρτύνοντο 4.422. Ἀψύρτῳ, καὶ πολλὰ πόρον ξεινήια δῶρα 4.423. οἷς μέτα καὶ πέπλον δόσαν ἱερὸν Ὑψιπυλείης 4.424. πορφύρεον. τὸν μέν ῥα Διωνύσῳ κάμον αὐταὶ 4.425. δίῃ ἐν ἀμφιάλῳ Χάριτες θεαί· αὐτὰρ ὁ παιδὶ 4.426. δῶκε Θόαντι μεταῦτις· ὁ δʼ αὖ λίπεν Ὑψιπυλείῃ· 4.427. ἡ δʼ ἔπορʼ Αἰσονίδῃ πολέσιν μετὰ καὶ τὸ φέρεσθαι 4.428. γλήνεσιν εὐεργὲς ξεινήιον. οὔ μιν ἀφάσσων 4.429. οὔτε κεν εἰσορόων γλυκὺν ἵμερον ἐμπλήσειας. 4.430. τοῦ δὲ καὶ ἀμβροσίη ὀδμὴ πέλεν ἐξέτι κείνου 4.431. ἐξ οὗ ἄναξ αὐτὸς Νυσήιος ἐγκατελεκτο 4.432. ἀκροχάλιξ οἴνῳ καὶ νέκταρι, καλὰ μεμαρπὼς 4.433. στήθεα παρθενικῆς Μινωίδος, ἥν ποτε Θησεὺς 4.434. Κνωσσόθεν ἑσπομένην Δίῃ ἔνι κάλλιπε νήσῳ. 4.435. ἡ δʼ ὅτε κηρύκεσσιν ἐπεξυνώσατο μύθους 4.436. θελγέμεν, εὖτʼ ἂν πρῶτα θεᾶς περὶ νηὸν ἵκηται 4.437. συνθεσίῃ, νυκτός τε μέλαν κνέφας ἀμφιβάλῃσιν 4.438. ἐλθέμεν, ὄφρα δόλον συμφράσσεται, ὥς κεν ἑλοῦσα 4.439. χρύσειον μέγα κῶας ὑπότροπος αὖτις ὀπίσσω 4.440. βαίη ἐς Αἰήταο δόμους· πέρι γάρ μιν ἀνάγκῃ 4.441. υἱῆες Φρίξοιο δόσαν ξείνοισιν ἄγεσθαι· 4.442. τοῖα παραιφαμένη θελκτήρια φάρμακʼ ἔπασσεν 4.443. αἰθέρι καὶ πνοιῇσι, τά κεν καὶ ἄπωθεν ἐόντα 4.444. ἄγριον ἠλιβάτοιο κατʼ οὔρεος ἤγαγε θῆρα. 4.445. σχέτλιʼ Ἔρως, μέγα πῆμα, μέγα στύγος ἀνθρώποισιν 4.446. ἐκ σέθεν οὐλόμεναί τʼ ἔριδες στοναχαί τε γόοι τε 4.447. ἄλγεά τʼ ἄλλʼ ἐπὶ τοῖσιν ἀπείρονα τετρήχασιν. 4.448. δυσμενέων ἐπὶ παισὶ κορύσσεο, δαῖμον, ἀερθείς 4.449. οἷος Μηδείῃ στυγερὴν φρεσὶν ἔμβαλες ἄτην. 4.450. πῶς γὰρ δὴ μετιόντα κακῷ ἐδάμασσεν ὀλέθρῳ 4.451. Ἄψυρτον; τὸ γὰρ ἧμιν ἐπισχερὼ ἦεν ἀοιδῆς. 4.452. ἦμος ὅτʼ Ἀρτέμιδος νήσῳ ἔνι τήνγʼ ἐλίποντο 4.453. συνθεσίῃ. τοὶ μέν ῥα διάνδιχα νηυσὶν ἔκελσαν 4.454. σφωιτέραις κρινθέντες· ὁ δʼ ἐς λόχον ᾖεν Ἰήσων 4.455. δέγμενος Ἄψυρτόν τε καὶ οὓς ἐξαῦτις ἑταίρους. 4.456. αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ αἰνοτάτῃσιν ὑποσχεσίῃσι δολωθεὶς 4.457. καρπαλίμως ᾗ νηὶ διὲξ ἁλὸς οἶδμα περήσας 4.458. νύχθʼ ὕπο λυγαίην ἱερῆς ἐπεβήσατο νήσου· 4.459. οἰόθι δʼ ἀντικρὺ μετιὼν πειρήσατο μύθοις 4.460. εἷο κασιγνήτης, ἀταλὸς πάις οἷα χαράδρης 4.461. χειμερίης, ἣν οὐδὲ διʼ αἰζηοὶ περόωσιν. 4.462. εἴ κε δόλον ξείνοισιν ἐπʼ ἀνδράσι τεχνήσαιτο. 4.463. καὶ τὼ μὲν τὰ ἕκαστα συνῄνεον ἀλλήλοισιν· 4.464. αὐτίκα δʼ Αἰσονίδης πυκινοῦ ἐξᾶλτο λόχοιο 4.465. γυμνὸν ἀνασχόμενος παλάμῃ ξίφος· αἶψα δὲ κούρη 4.466. ἔμπαλιν ὄμματʼ ἔνεικε, καλυψαμένη ὀθόνῃσιν 4.467. μὴ φόνον ἀθρήσειε κασιγνήτοιο τυπέντος. 4.468. τὸν δʼ ὅγε, βουτύπος ὥστε μέγαν κερεαλκέα ταῦρον 4.469. πλῆξεν ὀπιπεύσας νηοῦ σχεδόν, ὅν ποτʼ ἔδειμαν 4.470. Ἀρτέμιδι Βρυγοὶ περιναιέται ἀντιπέρηθεν. 4.471. τοῦ ὅγʼ ἐνὶ προδόμῳ γνὺξ ἤριπε· λοίσθια δʼ ἥρως 4.472. θυμὸν ἀναπνείων χερσὶν μέλαν ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 4.473. αἷμα κατʼ ὠτειλὴν ὑποΐσχετο· τῆς δὲ καλύπτρην 4.474. ἀργυφέην καὶ πέπλον ἀλευομένης ἐρύθηνεν. 4.475. ὀξὺ δὲ πανδαμάτωρ λοξῷ ἴδεν οἷον ἔρεξαν 4.476. ὄμματι νηλειὴς ὀλοφώιον ἔργον Ἐρινύς. 4.477. ἥρως δʼ Αἰσονίδης ἐξάργματα τάμνε θανόντος 4.478. τρὶς δʼ ἀπέλειξε φόνου, τρὶς δʼ ἐξ ἄγος ἔπτυσʼ ὀδόντων 4.479. ἣ θέμις αὐθέντῃσι δολοκτασίας ἱλάεσθαι. 4.480. ὑγρὸν δʼ ἐν γαίῃ κρύψεν νέκυν, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 4.481. κείαται ὀστέα κεῖνα μετʼ ἀνδράσιν Ἀψυρτεῦσιν. 4.482. οἱ δʼ ἄμυδις πυρσοῖο σέλας προπάροιθεν ἰδόντες 4.483. τό σφιν παρθενικὴ τέκμαρ μετιοῦσιν ἄειρεν 4.484. Κολχίδος ἀγχόθι νηὸς ἑὴν παρὰ νῆʼ ἐβάλοντο 4.485. ἥρωες· Κόλχον δʼ ὄλεκον στόλον, ἠύτε κίρκοι 4.486. φῦλα πελειάων, ἠὲ μέγα πῶυ λέοντες 4.487. ἀγρότεροι κλονέουσιν ἐνὶ σταθμοῖσι θορόντες. 4.488. οὐδʼ ἄρα τις κείνων θάνατον φύγε, πάντα δʼ ὅμιλον 4.489. πῦρ ἅ τε δηιόωντες ἐπέδραμον· ὀψὲ δʼ Ἰήσων 4.490. ἤντησεν, μεμαὼς ἐπαμυνέμεν οὐ μάλʼ ἀρωγῆς 4.491. δευομένοις· ἤδη δὲ καὶ ἀμφʼ αὐτοῖο μέλοντο. 4.492. ἔνθα δὲ ναυτιλίης πυκινὴν περὶ μητιάασκον 4.493. ἑζόμενοι βουλήν· ἐπὶ δέ σφισιν ἤλυθε κούρη 4.494. φραζομένοις· Πηλεὺς δὲ παροίτατος ἔκφατο μῦθον· 4.495. ‘ἤδη νῦν κέλομαι νύκτωρ ἔτι νῆʼ ἐπιβάντας 4.496. εἰρεσίῃ περάαν πλόον ἀντίον, ᾧ ἐπέχουσιν 4.497. δήιοι· ἠῶθεν γὰρ ἐπαθρήσαντας ἕκαστα 4.498. ἔλπομαι οὐχ ἕνα μῦθον, ὅτις προτέρωσε δίεσθαι 4.499. ἡμέας ὀτρυνέει, τοὺς πεισέμεν· οἷα δʼ ἄνακτος 4.500. εὔνιδες, ἀργαλέῃσι διχοστασίῃς κεδόωνται. 4.501. ῥηιδίη δέ κεν ἄμμι, κεδασθέντων δίχα λαῶν 4.502. ἤ τʼ εἴη μετέπειτα κατερχομένοισι κέλευθος.’ 4.503. ὧς ἔφατʼ· ᾔνησαν δὲ νέοι ἔπος Λἰακίδαο. 4.504. ῥίμφα δὲ νῆʼ ἐπιβάντες ἐπερρώοντʼ ἐλάτῃσιν 4.505. νωλεμές, ὄφρʼ ἱερὴν Ἠλεκτρίδα νῆσον ἵκοντο 4.506. ἀλλάων ὑπάτην, ποταμοῦ σχεδὸν Ἠριδανοῖο. 4.507. Κόλχοι δʼ ὁππότʼ ὄλεθρον ἐπεφράσθησαν ἄνακτος 4.508. ἤτοι μὲν δίζεσθαι ἐπέχραον ἔνδοθι πάσης 4.509. Ἀργὼ καὶ Μινύας Κρονίης ἁλός. ἀλλʼ ἀπέρυκεν 4.510. Ἥρη σμερδαλέῃσι κατʼ αἰθέρος ἀστεροπῇσιν. 4.511. ὕστατον αὐτοὶ δʼ αὖτε Κυταιίδος ἤθεα γαίης 4.512. στύξαν, ἀτυζόμενοι χόλον ἄγριον Αἰήταο 4.513. ἔμπεδα δʼ ἄλλυδις ἄλλοι ἐφορμηθέντες ἔνασθεν. 4.514. οἱ μὲν ἐπʼ αὐτάων νήσων ἔβαν, ᾗσιν ἐπέσχον 4.515. ἥρωες, ναίουσι δʼ ἐπώνυμοι Ἀψύρτοιο· 4.516. οἱ δʼ ἄρʼ ἐπʼ Ἰλλυρικοῖο μελαμβαθέος ποταμοῖο 4.517. τύμβος ἵνʼ Ἁρμονίης Κάδμοιό τε, πύργον ἔδειμαν 4.518. ἀνδράσιν Ἐγχελέεσσιν ἐφέστιοι· οἱ δʼ ἐν ὄρεσσιν 4.519. ἐνναίουσιν, ἅπερ τε Κεραύνια κικλήσκονται 4.520. ἐκ τόθεν, ἐξότε τούσγε Διὸς Κρονίδαο κεραυνοὶ 4.521. νῆσον ἐς ἀντιπέραιαν ἀπέτραπον ὁρμηθῆναι. 4.1051. αὐτῷ τʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι· νῦν δʼ ἐλάθεσθε 4.1209. δὴ τότε μιν βασιλῆος ἑοῦ τρομέοντας ἐνιπὰς


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
agamemnon de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
aietes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170, 200
alcinous Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
amasis Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
amycus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
apollonius rhodius de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
argos, son of phrixus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
cambyses Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
cedalion (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
clytemnestra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
colchis, colchians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170, 200
colchis Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
cyclops, cyclopes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
darius Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170
drepane Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
ethnography Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170
focalization, embedded (or secondary) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
fragments, of sophocles works Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
greece Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170
hera Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
idas de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
intertextuality, allusion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
intertextuality de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
jason, and medea Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
jason de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
kedalion satsurikos (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
klutaimnestra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
kolchides (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
lucian, on cedalion Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
medea Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
modello-esemplare, herodotus as Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170
monarchy Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
non-greeks' Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170
orion Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
painting, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
persia, persians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170, 200
phrixus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
pindar, and the women of colchis (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
plays, lost Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
scythia, scythians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170
simile de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
sophocles, lost plays and fragments of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
telamon de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
thrace, thracians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170
women of colchis, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 575
xerxes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 170