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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1051
Apollonius Of Rhodes, Argonautica, 4.1159-4.1160
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1. Homer, Iliad, 14.153-14.353, 18.168 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

14.153. /even so mighty a shout did the lord, the Shaker of Earth, send forth from his breast. and in the heart of each man of the Achaeans he put great strength, to war and fight unceasingly. 14.154. /even so mighty a shout did the lord, the Shaker of Earth, send forth from his breast. and in the heart of each man of the Achaeans he put great strength, to war and fight unceasingly. Now Hera of the golden throne, standing on a peak of Olympus, therefrom had sight of him, and forthwith knew him 14.155. /as he went busily about in the battle where men win glory, her own brother and her lord's withal; and she was glad at heart. And Zeus she marked seated on the topmost peak of many-fountained Ida, and hateful was he to her heart. Then she took thought, the ox-eyed, queenly Hera 14.156. /as he went busily about in the battle where men win glory, her own brother and her lord's withal; and she was glad at heart. And Zeus she marked seated on the topmost peak of many-fountained Ida, and hateful was he to her heart. Then she took thought, the ox-eyed, queenly Hera 14.157. /as he went busily about in the battle where men win glory, her own brother and her lord's withal; and she was glad at heart. And Zeus she marked seated on the topmost peak of many-fountained Ida, and hateful was he to her heart. Then she took thought, the ox-eyed, queenly Hera 14.158. /as he went busily about in the battle where men win glory, her own brother and her lord's withal; and she was glad at heart. And Zeus she marked seated on the topmost peak of many-fountained Ida, and hateful was he to her heart. Then she took thought, the ox-eyed, queenly Hera 14.159. /as he went busily about in the battle where men win glory, her own brother and her lord's withal; and she was glad at heart. And Zeus she marked seated on the topmost peak of many-fountained Ida, and hateful was he to her heart. Then she took thought, the ox-eyed, queenly Hera 14.160. /how she might beguile the mind of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And this plan seemed to her mind the best—to go to Ida, when she had beauteously adorned her person, if so be he might desire to lie by her side and embrace her body in love, and she might shed a warm and gentle sleep 14.161. /how she might beguile the mind of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And this plan seemed to her mind the best—to go to Ida, when she had beauteously adorned her person, if so be he might desire to lie by her side and embrace her body in love, and she might shed a warm and gentle sleep 14.162. /how she might beguile the mind of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And this plan seemed to her mind the best—to go to Ida, when she had beauteously adorned her person, if so be he might desire to lie by her side and embrace her body in love, and she might shed a warm and gentle sleep 14.163. /how she might beguile the mind of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And this plan seemed to her mind the best—to go to Ida, when she had beauteously adorned her person, if so be he might desire to lie by her side and embrace her body in love, and she might shed a warm and gentle sleep 14.164. /how she might beguile the mind of Zeus that beareth the aegis. And this plan seemed to her mind the best—to go to Ida, when she had beauteously adorned her person, if so be he might desire to lie by her side and embrace her body in love, and she might shed a warm and gentle sleep 14.165. /upon his eyelids and his cunning mind. So she went her way to her chamber, that her dear son Hephaestus had fashioned for her, and had fitted strong doors to the door-posts with a secret bolt, that no other god might open. Therein she entered, and closed the bright doors. 14.166. /upon his eyelids and his cunning mind. So she went her way to her chamber, that her dear son Hephaestus had fashioned for her, and had fitted strong doors to the door-posts with a secret bolt, that no other god might open. Therein she entered, and closed the bright doors. 14.167. /upon his eyelids and his cunning mind. So she went her way to her chamber, that her dear son Hephaestus had fashioned for her, and had fitted strong doors to the door-posts with a secret bolt, that no other god might open. Therein she entered, and closed the bright doors. 14.168. /upon his eyelids and his cunning mind. So she went her way to her chamber, that her dear son Hephaestus had fashioned for her, and had fitted strong doors to the door-posts with a secret bolt, that no other god might open. Therein she entered, and closed the bright doors. 14.169. /upon his eyelids and his cunning mind. So she went her way to her chamber, that her dear son Hephaestus had fashioned for her, and had fitted strong doors to the door-posts with a secret bolt, that no other god might open. Therein she entered, and closed the bright doors. 14.170. /With ambrosia first did she cleanse from her lovely body every stain, and anointed her richly with oil, ambrosial, soft, and of rich fragrance; were this but shaken in the palace of Zeus with threshold of bronze, even so would the savour thereof reach unto earth and heaven. 14.171. /With ambrosia first did she cleanse from her lovely body every stain, and anointed her richly with oil, ambrosial, soft, and of rich fragrance; were this but shaken in the palace of Zeus with threshold of bronze, even so would the savour thereof reach unto earth and heaven. 14.172. /With ambrosia first did she cleanse from her lovely body every stain, and anointed her richly with oil, ambrosial, soft, and of rich fragrance; were this but shaken in the palace of Zeus with threshold of bronze, even so would the savour thereof reach unto earth and heaven. 14.173. /With ambrosia first did she cleanse from her lovely body every stain, and anointed her richly with oil, ambrosial, soft, and of rich fragrance; were this but shaken in the palace of Zeus with threshold of bronze, even so would the savour thereof reach unto earth and heaven. 14.174. /With ambrosia first did she cleanse from her lovely body every stain, and anointed her richly with oil, ambrosial, soft, and of rich fragrance; were this but shaken in the palace of Zeus with threshold of bronze, even so would the savour thereof reach unto earth and heaven. 14.175. /Therewith she annointed her lovely body, and she combed her hair, and with her hands pIaited the bright tresses, fair and ambrosial, that streamed from her immortal head. Then she clothed her about in a robe ambrosial, which Athene had wrought for her with cunning skill, and had set thereon broideries full many; 14.176. /Therewith she annointed her lovely body, and she combed her hair, and with her hands pIaited the bright tresses, fair and ambrosial, that streamed from her immortal head. Then she clothed her about in a robe ambrosial, which Athene had wrought for her with cunning skill, and had set thereon broideries full many; 14.177. /Therewith she annointed her lovely body, and she combed her hair, and with her hands pIaited the bright tresses, fair and ambrosial, that streamed from her immortal head. Then she clothed her about in a robe ambrosial, which Athene had wrought for her with cunning skill, and had set thereon broideries full many; 14.178. /Therewith she annointed her lovely body, and she combed her hair, and with her hands pIaited the bright tresses, fair and ambrosial, that streamed from her immortal head. Then she clothed her about in a robe ambrosial, which Athene had wrought for her with cunning skill, and had set thereon broideries full many; 14.179. /Therewith she annointed her lovely body, and she combed her hair, and with her hands pIaited the bright tresses, fair and ambrosial, that streamed from her immortal head. Then she clothed her about in a robe ambrosial, which Athene had wrought for her with cunning skill, and had set thereon broideries full many; 14.180. /and she pinned it upon her breast with brooches of gold, and she girt about her a girdle set with an hundred tassels, and in her pierced ears she put ear-rings with three clustering drops; and abundant grace shone therefrom. And with a veil over all did the bright goddess 14.181. /and she pinned it upon her breast with brooches of gold, and she girt about her a girdle set with an hundred tassels, and in her pierced ears she put ear-rings with three clustering drops; and abundant grace shone therefrom. And with a veil over all did the bright goddess 14.182. /and she pinned it upon her breast with brooches of gold, and she girt about her a girdle set with an hundred tassels, and in her pierced ears she put ear-rings with three clustering drops; and abundant grace shone therefrom. And with a veil over all did the bright goddess 14.183. /and she pinned it upon her breast with brooches of gold, and she girt about her a girdle set with an hundred tassels, and in her pierced ears she put ear-rings with three clustering drops; and abundant grace shone therefrom. And with a veil over all did the bright goddess 14.184. /and she pinned it upon her breast with brooches of gold, and she girt about her a girdle set with an hundred tassels, and in her pierced ears she put ear-rings with three clustering drops; and abundant grace shone therefrom. And with a veil over all did the bright goddess 14.185. /veil herself, a fair veil, all glistering, and white was it as the sun; and beneath her shining feet she bound her fair sandals. But when she had decked her body with all adornment, she went forth from her chamber, and calling to her Aphrodite, apart from the other gods, she spake to her, saying: 14.186. /veil herself, a fair veil, all glistering, and white was it as the sun; and beneath her shining feet she bound her fair sandals. But when she had decked her body with all adornment, she went forth from her chamber, and calling to her Aphrodite, apart from the other gods, she spake to her, saying: 14.187. /veil herself, a fair veil, all glistering, and white was it as the sun; and beneath her shining feet she bound her fair sandals. But when she had decked her body with all adornment, she went forth from her chamber, and calling to her Aphrodite, apart from the other gods, she spake to her, saying: 14.188. /veil herself, a fair veil, all glistering, and white was it as the sun; and beneath her shining feet she bound her fair sandals. But when she had decked her body with all adornment, she went forth from her chamber, and calling to her Aphrodite, apart from the other gods, she spake to her, saying: 14.189. /veil herself, a fair veil, all glistering, and white was it as the sun; and beneath her shining feet she bound her fair sandals. But when she had decked her body with all adornment, she went forth from her chamber, and calling to her Aphrodite, apart from the other gods, she spake to her, saying: 14.190. / Wilt thou now hearken to me, dear child, in what I shall say? or wilt thou refuse me, being angered at heart for that I give aid to the Danaans and thou to the Trojans? 14.191. / Wilt thou now hearken to me, dear child, in what I shall say? or wilt thou refuse me, being angered at heart for that I give aid to the Danaans and thou to the Trojans? 14.192. / Wilt thou now hearken to me, dear child, in what I shall say? or wilt thou refuse me, being angered at heart for that I give aid to the Danaans and thou to the Trojans? 14.193. / Wilt thou now hearken to me, dear child, in what I shall say? or wilt thou refuse me, being angered at heart for that I give aid to the Danaans and thou to the Trojans? 14.194. / Wilt thou now hearken to me, dear child, in what I shall say? or wilt thou refuse me, being angered at heart for that I give aid to the Danaans and thou to the Trojans? Then made answer to her Aphrodite, daughter of Zeus:Hera, queenly goddess, daughter of great Cronos 14.195. /speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.196. /speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.197. /speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.198. /speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.199. /speak what is in thy mind; my heart bids me fulfill it, if fulfill it I can, and it is a thing that hath fulfillment. Then with crafty thought spake to her queenly Hera:Give me now love and desire, wherewith thou art wont to subdue all immortals and mortal men. 14.200. /For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.201. /For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.202. /For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.203. /For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.204. /For I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed and cherished me in their halls, when they had taken me from Rhea, what time Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, thrust Cronos down to dwell beneath earth and the unresting sea. 14.205. /Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, since now for a long time's space they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath come upon their hearts. If by words I might but persuade the hearts of these twain, and bring them back to be joined together in love 14.206. /Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, since now for a long time's space they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath come upon their hearts. If by words I might but persuade the hearts of these twain, and bring them back to be joined together in love 14.207. /Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, since now for a long time's space they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath come upon their hearts. If by words I might but persuade the hearts of these twain, and bring them back to be joined together in love 14.208. /Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, since now for a long time's space they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath come upon their hearts. If by words I might but persuade the hearts of these twain, and bring them back to be joined together in love 14.209. /Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife, since now for a long time's space they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath come upon their hearts. If by words I might but persuade the hearts of these twain, and bring them back to be joined together in love 14.210. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.211. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.212. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.213. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.214. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone 14.215. /curiously-wrought, wherein are fashioned all manner of allurements; therein is love, therein desire, therein dalliance—beguilement that steals the wits even of the wise. This she laid in her hands, and spake, and addressed her:Take now and lay in thy bosom this zone 14.216. /curiously-wrought, wherein are fashioned all manner of allurements; therein is love, therein desire, therein dalliance—beguilement that steals the wits even of the wise. This she laid in her hands, and spake, and addressed her:Take now and lay in thy bosom this zone 14.217. /curiously-wrought, wherein are fashioned all manner of allurements; therein is love, therein desire, therein dalliance—beguilement that steals the wits even of the wise. This she laid in her hands, and spake, and addressed her:Take now and lay in thy bosom this zone 14.218. /curiously-wrought, wherein are fashioned all manner of allurements; therein is love, therein desire, therein dalliance—beguilement that steals the wits even of the wise. This she laid in her hands, and spake, and addressed her:Take now and lay in thy bosom this zone 14.219. /curiously-wrought, wherein are fashioned all manner of allurements; therein is love, therein desire, therein dalliance—beguilement that steals the wits even of the wise. This she laid in her hands, and spake, and addressed her:Take now and lay in thy bosom this zone 14.220. /curiously-wrought, wherein all things are fashioned; I tell thee thou shalt not return with that unaccomplished, whatsoever in thy heart thou desirest. So spake she, and ox-eyed, queenly Hera smiled, and smiling laid the zone in her bosom.She then went to her house, the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite 14.221. /curiously-wrought, wherein all things are fashioned; I tell thee thou shalt not return with that unaccomplished, whatsoever in thy heart thou desirest. So spake she, and ox-eyed, queenly Hera smiled, and smiling laid the zone in her bosom.She then went to her house, the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite 14.222. /curiously-wrought, wherein all things are fashioned; I tell thee thou shalt not return with that unaccomplished, whatsoever in thy heart thou desirest. So spake she, and ox-eyed, queenly Hera smiled, and smiling laid the zone in her bosom.She then went to her house, the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite 14.223. /curiously-wrought, wherein all things are fashioned; I tell thee thou shalt not return with that unaccomplished, whatsoever in thy heart thou desirest. So spake she, and ox-eyed, queenly Hera smiled, and smiling laid the zone in her bosom.She then went to her house, the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite 14.224. /curiously-wrought, wherein all things are fashioned; I tell thee thou shalt not return with that unaccomplished, whatsoever in thy heart thou desirest. So spake she, and ox-eyed, queenly Hera smiled, and smiling laid the zone in her bosom.She then went to her house, the daughter of Zeus, Aphrodite 14.225. /but Hera darted down and left the peak of Olympus; on Pieria she stepped and lovely Emathia, and sped over the snowy mountains of the Thracian horsemen, even over their topmost peaks, nor grazed she the ground with her feet; and from Athos she stepped upon the billowy sea 14.226. /but Hera darted down and left the peak of Olympus; on Pieria she stepped and lovely Emathia, and sped over the snowy mountains of the Thracian horsemen, even over their topmost peaks, nor grazed she the ground with her feet; and from Athos she stepped upon the billowy sea 14.227. /but Hera darted down and left the peak of Olympus; on Pieria she stepped and lovely Emathia, and sped over the snowy mountains of the Thracian horsemen, even over their topmost peaks, nor grazed she the ground with her feet; and from Athos she stepped upon the billowy sea 14.228. /but Hera darted down and left the peak of Olympus; on Pieria she stepped and lovely Emathia, and sped over the snowy mountains of the Thracian horsemen, even over their topmost peaks, nor grazed she the ground with her feet; and from Athos she stepped upon the billowy sea 14.229. /but Hera darted down and left the peak of Olympus; on Pieria she stepped and lovely Emathia, and sped over the snowy mountains of the Thracian horsemen, even over their topmost peaks, nor grazed she the ground with her feet; and from Athos she stepped upon the billowy sea 14.230. /and so came to Lemnos, the city of godlike Thoas. There she met Sleep, the brother of Death; and she clasped him by the hand, and spake and addressed him:Sleep, lord of all gods and of all men, if ever thou didst hearken to word of mine, so do thou even now obey 14.231. /and so came to Lemnos, the city of godlike Thoas. There she met Sleep, the brother of Death; and she clasped him by the hand, and spake and addressed him:Sleep, lord of all gods and of all men, if ever thou didst hearken to word of mine, so do thou even now obey 14.232. /and so came to Lemnos, the city of godlike Thoas. There she met Sleep, the brother of Death; and she clasped him by the hand, and spake and addressed him:Sleep, lord of all gods and of all men, if ever thou didst hearken to word of mine, so do thou even now obey 14.233. /and so came to Lemnos, the city of godlike Thoas. There she met Sleep, the brother of Death; and she clasped him by the hand, and spake and addressed him:Sleep, lord of all gods and of all men, if ever thou didst hearken to word of mine, so do thou even now obey 14.234. /and so came to Lemnos, the city of godlike Thoas. There she met Sleep, the brother of Death; and she clasped him by the hand, and spake and addressed him:Sleep, lord of all gods and of all men, if ever thou didst hearken to word of mine, so do thou even now obey 14.235. /and I will owe thee thanks all my days. Lull me to sleep the bright eyes of Zeus beneath his brows, so soon as I shall have lain me by his side in love. And gifts will I give thee, a fair throne, ever imperishable, wrought of gold, that Hephaestus, mine own son 14.236. /and I will owe thee thanks all my days. Lull me to sleep the bright eyes of Zeus beneath his brows, so soon as I shall have lain me by his side in love. And gifts will I give thee, a fair throne, ever imperishable, wrought of gold, that Hephaestus, mine own son 14.237. /and I will owe thee thanks all my days. Lull me to sleep the bright eyes of Zeus beneath his brows, so soon as I shall have lain me by his side in love. And gifts will I give thee, a fair throne, ever imperishable, wrought of gold, that Hephaestus, mine own son 14.238. /and I will owe thee thanks all my days. Lull me to sleep the bright eyes of Zeus beneath his brows, so soon as I shall have lain me by his side in love. And gifts will I give thee, a fair throne, ever imperishable, wrought of gold, that Hephaestus, mine own son 14.239. /and I will owe thee thanks all my days. Lull me to sleep the bright eyes of Zeus beneath his brows, so soon as I shall have lain me by his side in love. And gifts will I give thee, a fair throne, ever imperishable, wrought of gold, that Hephaestus, mine own son 14.240. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. 14.241. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. 14.242. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. 14.243. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. 14.244. /the god of the two strong arms, shall fashion thee with skill, and beneath it shall he set a foot-stool for the feet, whereon thou mayest rest thy shining feet when thou quaffest thy wine. Then sweet Sleep made answer to her, saying:Hera, queenly goddess, daughter of great Cronos, another of the gods, that are for ever, might I lightly lull to sleep, aye, were it even the streams of the river 14.245. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.246. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.247. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.248. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.249. /Oceanus, from whom they all are sprung; but to Zeus, son of Cronos, will I not draw nigh, neither lull him to slumber, unless of himself he bid me. For ere now in another matter did a behest of thine teach me a lesson 14.250. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.251. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.252. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.253. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.254. /on the day when the glorious son of Zeus, high of heart, sailed forth from Ilios, when he had laid waste the city of the Trojans. I, verily, beguiled the mind of Zeus, that beareth the aegis, being shed in sweetness round about him, and thou didst devise evil in thy heart against his son, when thou hadst roused the blasts of cruel winds over the face of the deep, and thereafter didst bear him away unto well-peopled Cos, far from all his kinsfolk. But Zeus, when he awakened, was wroth, and flung the gods hither and thither about his palace, and me above all he sought, and would have hurled me from heaven into the deep to be no more seen, had Night not saved me—Night that bends to her sway both gods and men. 14.260. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.261. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.262. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.263. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.264. /To her I came in my flight, and besought her, and Zeus refrained him, albeit he was wroth, for he had awe lest he do aught displeasing to swift Night. And now again thou biddest me fulfill this other task, that may nowise be done. To him then spake again ox-eyed, queenly Hera:Sleep, wherefore ponderest thou of these things in thine heart? 14.265. /Deemest thou that Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, will aid the Trojans, even as he waxed wroth for the sake of Heracles, his own son? Nay, come, I will give thee one of the youthful Graces to wed to be called thy wife, even Pasithea, for whom thou ever longest all thy days. 14.266. /Deemest thou that Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, will aid the Trojans, even as he waxed wroth for the sake of Heracles, his own son? Nay, come, I will give thee one of the youthful Graces to wed to be called thy wife, even Pasithea, for whom thou ever longest all thy days. 14.267. /Deemest thou that Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, will aid the Trojans, even as he waxed wroth for the sake of Heracles, his own son? Nay, come, I will give thee one of the youthful Graces to wed to be called thy wife, even Pasithea, for whom thou ever longest all thy days. 14.268. /Deemest thou that Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, will aid the Trojans, even as he waxed wroth for the sake of Heracles, his own son? Nay, come, I will give thee one of the youthful Graces to wed to be called thy wife, even Pasithea, for whom thou ever longest all thy days. 14.269. /Deemest thou that Zeus, whose voice is borne afar, will aid the Trojans, even as he waxed wroth for the sake of Heracles, his own son? Nay, come, I will give thee one of the youthful Graces to wed to be called thy wife, even Pasithea, for whom thou ever longest all thy days. 14.270. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.271. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.272. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.273. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.274. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos 14.275. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.276. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.277. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.278. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.279. /that verily thou wilt give me one of the youthful Graces, even Pasithea, that myself I long for all my days. So spake he, and the goddess, white-armed Hera, failed not to hearken, but sware as he bade, and invoked by name all the gods below Tartarus, that are called Titans. 14.280. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.281. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.282. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.283. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.284. /But when she had sworn and made an end of the oath, the twain left the cities of Lemnos and Imbros, and clothed about in mist went forth, speeding swiftly on their way. To many-fountained Ida they came, the mother of wild creatures, even to Lectum, where first they left the sea; and the twain fared on over the dry land 14.285. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.286. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.287. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.288. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.289. /and the topmost forest quivered beneath their feet. There Sleep did halt, or ever the eyes of Zeus beheld him, and mounted up on a fir-tree exceeding tall, the highest that then grew in Ida; and it reached up through the mists into heaven. Thereon he perched, thick-hidden by the branches of the fir 14.290. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.291. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.292. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.293. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.294. /in the likeness of a clear-voiced mountain bird, that the gods call Chalcis, and men Cymindis.But Hera swiftly drew nigh to topmost Gargarus, the peak of lofty Ida, and Zeus, the cloud-gatherer, beheld her. And when he beheld her, then love encompassed his wise heart about 14.295. /even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount. 14.296. /even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount. 14.297. /even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount. 14.298. /even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount. 14.299. /even as when at the first they had gone to the couch and had dalliance together in love, their dear parents knowing naught thereof. And he stood before her, and spake, and addressed her:Hera, with what desire art thou thus come hither down from Olympus? Lo, thy horses are not at hand, neither thy chariot, whereon thou mightest mount. 14.300. /Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife 14.301. /Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife 14.302. /Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife 14.303. /Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife 14.304. /Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:I am faring to visit the limits of the all-nurturing earth, and Oceanus, from whom the gods are sprung, and mother Tethys, even them that lovingly nursed me and cherished me in their halls. Them am I faring to visit, and will loose for them their endless strife 14.305. /since now for long time's apace they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath fallen upon their hearts. And my horses stand at the foot of many-fountained Ida, my horses that shall bear me both over the solid land and the waters of the sea. But now it is because of thee that I am come hither down from Olympus 14.306. /since now for long time's apace they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath fallen upon their hearts. And my horses stand at the foot of many-fountained Ida, my horses that shall bear me both over the solid land and the waters of the sea. But now it is because of thee that I am come hither down from Olympus 14.307. /since now for long time's apace they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath fallen upon their hearts. And my horses stand at the foot of many-fountained Ida, my horses that shall bear me both over the solid land and the waters of the sea. But now it is because of thee that I am come hither down from Olympus 14.308. /since now for long time's apace they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath fallen upon their hearts. And my horses stand at the foot of many-fountained Ida, my horses that shall bear me both over the solid land and the waters of the sea. But now it is because of thee that I am come hither down from Olympus 14.309. /since now for long time's apace they hold aloof one from the other from the marriage-bed and from love, for that wrath hath fallen upon their hearts. And my horses stand at the foot of many-fountained Ida, my horses that shall bear me both over the solid land and the waters of the sea. But now it is because of thee that I am come hither down from Olympus 14.310. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.311. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.312. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.313. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. 14.314. /lest haply thou mightest wax wroth with me hereafter, if without a word I depart to the house of deep-flowing Oceanus. Then in answer spake to her Zeus, the cloud-gatherer.Hera, thither mayest thou go even hereafter. But for us twain, come, let us take our joy couched together in love; 14.315. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.316. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.317. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.318. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.319. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 14.320. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.321. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.322. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.323. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.324. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.325. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.326. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.327. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.328. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.329. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him: 14.330. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said. If now thou art fain to be couched in love on the peaks of Ida, where all is plain to view, what and if some one of the gods that are for ever should behold us twain as we sleep, and should go and tell it to all the gods? 14.331. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said. If now thou art fain to be couched in love on the peaks of Ida, where all is plain to view, what and if some one of the gods that are for ever should behold us twain as we sleep, and should go and tell it to all the gods? 14.332. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said. If now thou art fain to be couched in love on the peaks of Ida, where all is plain to view, what and if some one of the gods that are for ever should behold us twain as we sleep, and should go and tell it to all the gods? 14.333. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said. If now thou art fain to be couched in love on the peaks of Ida, where all is plain to view, what and if some one of the gods that are for ever should behold us twain as we sleep, and should go and tell it to all the gods? 14.334. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said. If now thou art fain to be couched in love on the peaks of Ida, where all is plain to view, what and if some one of the gods that are for ever should behold us twain as we sleep, and should go and tell it to all the gods? 14.335. /Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. 14.336. /Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. 14.337. /Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. 14.338. /Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. 14.339. /Then verily could not I arise from the couch and go again to thy house; that were a shameful thing. But if thou wilt, and it is thy heart's good pleasure, thou hast a chamber, that thy dear son Hephaestus fashioned for thee, and fitted strong doors upon the door-posts. 14.340. /Thither let us go and lay us down, since the couch is thy desire. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Hera, fear thou not that any god or man shall behold the thing, with such a cloud shall I enfold thee withal, a cloud of gold. Therethrough might not even Helios discern us twain 14.341. /Thither let us go and lay us down, since the couch is thy desire. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Hera, fear thou not that any god or man shall behold the thing, with such a cloud shall I enfold thee withal, a cloud of gold. Therethrough might not even Helios discern us twain 14.342. /Thither let us go and lay us down, since the couch is thy desire. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Hera, fear thou not that any god or man shall behold the thing, with such a cloud shall I enfold thee withal, a cloud of gold. Therethrough might not even Helios discern us twain 14.343. /Thither let us go and lay us down, since the couch is thy desire. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Hera, fear thou not that any god or man shall behold the thing, with such a cloud shall I enfold thee withal, a cloud of gold. Therethrough might not even Helios discern us twain 14.344. /Thither let us go and lay us down, since the couch is thy desire. Then in answer to her spake Zeus, the cloud-gatherer:Hera, fear thou not that any god or man shall behold the thing, with such a cloud shall I enfold thee withal, a cloud of gold. Therethrough might not even Helios discern us twain 14.345. /albeit his sight is the keenest of all for beholding. Therewith the son of Cronos clasped his wife in his arms, and beneath them the divine earth made fresh-sprung grass to grow, and dewy lotus, and crocus, and hyacinth, thick and soft, that upbare them from the ground. 14.346. /albeit his sight is the keenest of all for beholding. Therewith the son of Cronos clasped his wife in his arms, and beneath them the divine earth made fresh-sprung grass to grow, and dewy lotus, and crocus, and hyacinth, thick and soft, that upbare them from the ground. 14.347. /albeit his sight is the keenest of all for beholding. Therewith the son of Cronos clasped his wife in his arms, and beneath them the divine earth made fresh-sprung grass to grow, and dewy lotus, and crocus, and hyacinth, thick and soft, that upbare them from the ground. 14.348. /albeit his sight is the keenest of all for beholding. Therewith the son of Cronos clasped his wife in his arms, and beneath them the divine earth made fresh-sprung grass to grow, and dewy lotus, and crocus, and hyacinth, thick and soft, that upbare them from the ground. 14.349. /albeit his sight is the keenest of all for beholding. Therewith the son of Cronos clasped his wife in his arms, and beneath them the divine earth made fresh-sprung grass to grow, and dewy lotus, and crocus, and hyacinth, thick and soft, that upbare them from the ground. 14.350. /Therein lay the twain, and were clothed about with a cloud, fair and golden, wherefrom fell drops of glistering dew. 14.351. /Therein lay the twain, and were clothed about with a cloud, fair and golden, wherefrom fell drops of glistering dew. 14.352. /Therein lay the twain, and were clothed about with a cloud, fair and golden, wherefrom fell drops of glistering dew. 14.353. /Therein lay the twain, and were clothed about with a cloud, fair and golden, wherefrom fell drops of glistering dew. 18.168. /And now would he have dragged away the body, and have won glory unspeakable, had not wind-footed, swift Iris speeding from Olympus with a message that he array him for battle, come to the son of Peleus, all unknown of Zeus and the other gods, for Hera sent her forth. And she drew nigh, and spake to him winged words:
2. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.26-1.31, 1.471-1.473, 1.537, 1.916-1.917, 1.1135-1.1137, 2.686-2.694, 2.927-2.929, 3.8-3.9, 3.25-3.110, 3.248-3.249, 3.619-3.632, 3.997-3.1004, 3.1074-3.1076, 3.1096-3.1101, 3.1132, 4.121, 4.421-4.444, 4.789-4.832, 4.982-4.1158, 4.1160-4.1222, 4.1411-4.1422, 4.1548-4.1549 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.26. αὐτὰρ τόνγʼ ἐνέπουσιν ἀτειρέας οὔρεσι πέτρας 1.27. θέλξαι ἀοιδάων ἐνοπῇ ποταμῶν τε ῥέεθρα. 1.28. φηγοὶ δʼ ἀγριάδες, κείνης ἔτι σήματα μολπῆς 1.29. ἀκτῆς Θρηικίης Ζώνης ἔπι τηλεθόωσαι 1.30. ἑξείης στιχόωσιν ἐπήτριμοι, ἃς ὅγʼ ἐπιπρὸ 1.31. θελγομένας φόρμιγγι κατήγαγε Πιερίηθεν. 1.471. τοῖόν μʼ Ἀρήνηθεν ἀοσσητῆρα κομίζεις.’ 1.472. ἦ, καὶ ἐπισχόμενος πλεῖον δέπας ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.473. πῖνε χαλίκρητον λαρὸν μέθυ· δεύετο δʼ οἴνῳ 1.537. ᾔ που ἐν Ὀρτυγίῃ, ἢ ἐφʼ ὕδασιν Ἰσμηνοῖο 1.916. νῆσον ἐς Ἠλέκτρης Ἀτλαντίδος, ὄφρα δαέντες 1.917. ἀρρήτους ἀγανῇσι τελεσφορίῃσι θέμιστας 1.1135. σκαίροντες βηταρμὸν ἐνόπλιον ὠρχήσαντο 1.1136. καὶ σάκεα ξιφέεσσιν ἐπέκτυπον, ὥς κεν ἰωὴ 1.1137. δύσφημος πλάζοιτο διʼ ἠέρος, ἣν ἔτι λαοὶ 2.686. ‘εἰ δʼ ἄγε δὴ νῆσον μὲν Ἑωίου Ἀπόλλωνος 2.687. τήνδʼ ἱερὴν κλείωμεν, ἐπεὶ πάντεσσι φαάνθη 2.688. ἠῷος μετιών· τὰ δὲ ῥέξομεν οἷα πάρεστιν 2.689. βωμὸν ἀναστήσαντες ἐπάκτιον· εἰ δʼ ἂν ὀπίσσω 2.690. γαῖαν ἐς Αἱμονίην ἀσκηθέα νόστον ὀπάσσῃ 2.691. δὴ τότε οἱ κεραῶν ἐπὶ μηρία θήσομεν αἰγῶν. 2.692. νῦν δʼ αὔτως κνίσῃ λοιβῇσί τε μειλίξασθαι 2.693. κέκλομαι. ἀλλʼ ἵληθι ἄναξ, ἵληθι φαανθείς.’ 2.694. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· καὶ τοὶ μὲν ἄφαρ βωμὸν τετύκοντο 2.927. ἄνδιχα δʼ αὖ χύτλων νηοσσόῳ Ἀπόλλωνι 2.928. βωμὸν δειμάμενοι μῆρʼ ἔφλεγον ἂν δὲ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς 2.929. θῆκε λύρην· ἐκ τοῦ δὲ Λύρη πέλει οὔνομα χώρῳ. 3.8. Ἥρη Ἀθηναίη τε, Διὸς δʼ αὐτοῖο καὶ ἄλλων 3.9. ἀθανάτων ἀπονόσφι θεῶν θάλαμόνδε κιοῦσαι 3.25. ‘δεῦρʼ ἴομεν μετὰ Κύπριν· ἐπιπλόμεναι δέ μιν ἄμφω 3.26. παιδὶ ἑῷ εἰπεῖν ὀτρύνομεν, αἴ κε πίθηται 3.27. κούρην Αἰήτεω πολυφάρμακον οἷσι βέλεσσιν 3.28. θέλξαι ὀιστεύσας ἐπʼ Ἰήσονι. τὸν δʼ ἂν ὀίω 3.29. κείνης ἐννεσίῃσιν ἐς Ἑλλάδα κῶας ἀνάξειν.’ 3.30. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πυκινὴ δὲ συνεύαδε μῆτις Ἀθήνῃ 3.31. καί μιν ἔπειτʼ ἐξαῦτις ἀμείβετο μειλιχίοισιν· 3.32. ‘Ἥρη, νήιδα μέν με πατὴρ τέκε τοῖο βολάων 3.33. οὐδέ τινα χρειὼ θελκτήριον οἶδα πόθοιο. 3.34. εἰ δέ σοι αὐτῇ μῦθος ἐφανδάνει, ἦ τʼ ἂν ἔγωγε 3.35. ἑσποίμην· σὺ δέ κεν φαίης ἔπος ἀντιόωσα.’ 3.36. ἦ, καὶ ἀναΐξασαι ἐπὶ μέγα δῶμα νέοντο 3.37. Κύπριδος, ὅ ῥά τέ οἱ δεῖμεν πόσις ἀμφιγυήεις 3.38. ὁππότε μιν τὰ πρῶτα παραὶ Διὸς ἦγεν ἄκοιτιν. 3.39. ἕρκεα δʼ εἰσελθοῦσαι ὑπʼ αἰθούσῃ θαλάμοιο 3.40. ἔσταν, ἵνʼ ἐντύνεσκε θεὰ λέχος Ἡφαίστοιο. 3.41. ἀλλʼ ὁ μὲν ἐς χαλκεῶνα καὶ ἄκμονας ἦρι βεβήκει 3.42. νήσοιο πλαγκτῆς εὐρὺν μυχόν, ᾧ ἔνι πάντα 3.43. δαίδαλα χάλκευεν ῥιπῇ πυρόσʼ ἡ δʼ ἄρα μούνη 3.44. ἧστο δόμῳ δινωτὸν ἀνὰ θρόνον, ἄντα θυράων. 3.45. λευκοῖσιν δʼ ἑκάτερθε κόμας ἐπιειμένη ὤμοις 3.46. κόσμει χρυσείῃ διὰ κερκίδι, μέλλε δὲ μακροὺς 3.47. πλέξασθαι πλοκάμους· τὰς δὲ προπάροιθεν ἰδοῦσα 3.48. ἔσχεθεν, εἴσω τέ σφʼ ἐκάλει, καὶ ἀπὸ θρόνου ὦρτο 3.49. εἷσέ τʼ ἐνὶ κλισμοῖσιν· ἀτὰρ μετέπειτα καὶ αὐτὴ 3.50. ἵζανεν, ἀψήκτους δὲ χεροῖν ἀνεδήσατο χαίτας. 3.51. τοῖα δὲ μειδιόωσα προσέννεπεν αἱμυλίοισιν· 3.52. ‘Ἠθεῖαι, τίς δεῦρο νόος χρειω τε κομίζει 3.53. δηναιὰς αὔτως; τί δʼ ἱκάνετον, οὔτι πάρος γε 3.54. λίην φοιτίζουσαι, ἐπεὶ περίεστε θεάων;’ 3.55. τὴν δʼ Ἥρη τοίοισιν ἀμειβομένη προσέειπεν· 3.56. ‘Κερτομέεις· νῶιν δὲ κέαρ συνορίνεται ἄτῃ. 3.57. ἤδη γὰρ ποταμῷ ἐνὶ Φάσιδι νῆα κατίσχει 3.58. Αἰσονίδης, ἠδʼ ἄλλοι ὅσοι μετὰ κῶας ἕπονται. 3.59. τῶν ἤτοι πάντων μέν, ἐπεὶ πέλας ἔργον ὄρωρεν 3.60. δείδιμεν ἐκπάγλως, περὶ δʼ Αἰσονίδαο μάλιστα. 3.61. τὸν μὲν ἐγών, εἰ καί περ ἐς Ἄιδα ναυτίλληται 3.62. λυσόμενος χαλκέων Ἰξίονα νειόθι δεσμῶν 3.63. ῥύσομαι, ὅσσον ἐμοῖσιν ἐνὶ σθένος ἔπλετο γυίοις 3.64. ὄφρα μὴ ἐγγελάσῃ Πελίης κακὸν οἶτον ἀλύξας 3.65. ὅς μʼ ὑπερηνορέῃ θυέων ἀγέραστον ἔθηκεν. 3.66. καὶ δʼ ἄλλως ἔτι καὶ πρὶν ἐμοὶ μέγα φίλατʼ Ἰήσων 3.67. ἐξότʼ ἐπὶ προχοῇσιν ἅλις πλήθοντος Ἀναύρου 3.68. ἀνδρῶν εὐνομίης πειρωμένῃ ἀντεβόλησεν 3.69. θήρης ἐξανιών· νιφετῷ δʼ ἐπαλύνετο πάντα 3.70. οὔρεα καὶ σκοπιαὶ περιμήκεες, οἱ δὲ κατʼ αὐτῶν 3.71. χείμαρροι καναχηδὰ κυλινδόμενοι φορέοντο. 3.72. γρηὶ δέ μʼ εἰσαμένην ὀλοφύρατο, καί μʼ ἀναείρας 3.73. αὐτὸς ἑοῖς ὤμοισι διὲκ προαλὲς φέρεν ὕδωρ. 3.74. τῶ νύ μοι ἄλληκτον περιτίεται· οὐδέ κε λώβην 3.75. τίσειεν Πελίης, εἰ μή σύ γε νόστον ὀπάσσεις.’ 3.76. ὧς ηὔδα· Κύπριν δʼ ἐνεοστασίη λάβε μύθων. 3.77. ἅζετο δʼ ἀντομένην Ἥρην ἕθεν εἰσορόωσα 3.78. καί μιν ἔπειτʼ ἀγανοῖσι προσέννεπεν ἥγʼ ἐπέεσσιν· 3.79. ‘πότνα θεά, μή τοί τι κακώτερον ἄλλο πέλοιτο 3.80. Κύπριδος, εἰ δὴ σεῖο λιλαιομένης ἀθερίζω 3.81. ἢ ἔπος ἠέ τι ἔργον, ὅ κεν χέρες αἵγε κάμοιεν 3.82. ἠπεδαναί· καὶ μή τις ἀμοιβαίη χάρις ἔστω.’ 3.83. ὧς ἔφαθʼ· Ἥρη δʼ αὖτις ἐπιφραδέως ἀγορευσεν· 3.84. ‘οὔτι βίης χατέουσαι ἱκάνομεν, οὐδέ τι χειρῶν. 3.85. ἀλλʼ αὔτως ἀκέουσα τεῷ ἐπικέκλεο παιδὶ 3.86. παρθένον Αἰήτεω θέλξαι πόθῳ Αἰσονίδαο. 3.87. εἰ γάρ οἱ κείνη συμφράσσεται εὐμενέουσα 3.88. ῥηιδίως μιν ἑλόντα δέρος χρύσειον ὀίω 3.89. νοστήσειν ἐς Ἰωλκόν, ἐπεὶ δολόεσσα τέτυκται.’ 3.90. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· Κύπρις δὲ μετʼ ἀμφοτέρῃσιν ἔειπεν· 3.91. ‘Ἥρη, Ἀθηναίη τε, πίθοιτό κεν ὔμμι μάλιστα 3.92. ἢ ἐμοί. ὑμείων γὰρ ἀναιδήτῳ περ ἐόντι 3.93. τυτθή γʼ αἰδὼς ἔσσετʼ ἐν ὄμμασιν· αὐτὰρ ἐμεῖο 3.94. οὐκ ὄθεται, μάλα δʼ αἰὲν ἐριδμαίνων ἀθερίζει. 3.95. καὶ δή οἱ μενέηνα, περισχομένη κακότητι 3.96. αὐτοῖσιν τόξοισι δυσηχέας ἆξαι ὀιστοὺς 3.97. ἀμφαδίην. τοῖον γὰρ ἐπηπείλησε χαλεφθείς 3.98. εἰ μὴ τηλόθι χεῖρας, ἕως ἔτι θυμὸν ἐρύκει 3.99. ἕξω ἐμάς, μετέπειτά γʼ ἀτεμβοίμην ἑοῖ αὐτῇ.’ 3.100. ὧς φάτο· μείδησαν δὲ θεαί, καὶ ἐσέδρακον ἄντην 3.101. ἀλλήλαις. ἡ δʼ αὖτις ἀκηχεμένη προσέειπεν· 3.102. ‘ἄλλοις ἄλγεα τἀμὰ γέλως πέλει· οὐδέ τί με χρὴ 3.103. μυθεῖσθαι πάντεσσιν· ἅλις εἰδυῖα καὶ αὐτή. 3.104. νῦν δʼ ἐπεὶ ὔμμι φίλον τόδε δὴ πέλει ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 3.105. πειρήσω, καί μιν μειλίξομαι, οὐδʼ ἀπιθήσει.’ 3.106. ὧς φάτο· τὴν δʼ Ἥρη ῥαδινῆς ἐπεμάσσατο χειρός 3.107. ἦκα δὲ μειδιόωσα παραβλήδην προσέειπεν· 3.108. ‘οὕτω νῦν, Κυθέρεια, τόδε χρέος, ὡς ἀγορεύεις 3.109. ἔρξον ἄφαρ· καὶ μή τι χαλέπτεο, μηδʼ ἐρίδαινε 3.110. χωομένη σῷ παιδί· μεταλλήξει γὰρ ὀπίσσω.’ 3.248. ἄμφω, Χαλκιόπη Μήδειά τε. τὴν μὲν ἄρʼ οἵγε 3.249. ἐκ θαλάμου θάλαμόνδε κασιγνήτην μετιοῦσαν-- 3.619. τὸν ξεῖνον δʼ ἐδόκησεν ὑφεστάμεναι τὸν ἄεθλον 3.620. οὔτι μάλʼ ὁρμαίνοντα δέρος κριοῖο κομίσσαι 3.621. οὐδέ τι τοῖο ἕκητι μετὰ πτόλιν Αἰήταο 3.622. ἐλθέμεν, ὄφρα δέ μιν σφέτερον δόμον εἰσαγάγοιτο 3.623. κουριδίην παράκοιτιν· ὀίετο δʼ ἀμφὶ βόεσσιν 3.624. αὐτὴ ἀεθλεύουσα μάλʼ εὐμαρέως πονέεσθαι· 3.625. σφωιτέρους δὲ τοκῆας ὑποσχεσίης ἀθερίζειν 3.626. οὕνεκεν οὐ κούρῃ ζεῦξαι βόας, ἀλλά οἱ αὐτῷ 3.627. προύθεσαν· ἐκ δʼ ἄρα τοῦ νεῖκος πέλεν ἀμφήριστον 3.628. πατρί τε καὶ ξείνοις· αὐτῇ δʼ ἐπιέτρεπον ἄμφω 3.629. τὼς ἔμεν, ὥς κεν ἑῇσι μετὰ φρεσὶν ἰθύσειεν. 3.630. ἡ δʼ ἄφνω τὸν ξεῖνον, ἀφειδήσασα τοκήων 3.631. εἵλετο· τοὺς δʼ ἀμέγαρτον ἄχος λάβεν, ἐκ δʼ ἐβόησαν 3.632. χωόμενοι· τὴν δʼ ὕπνος ἅμα κλαγγῇ μεθέηκεν. 3.997. δή ποτε καὶ Θησῆα κακῶν ὑπελύσατʼ ἀέθλων 3.998. παρθενικὴ Μινωὶς ἐυφρονέουσʼ Ἀριάδνη 3.999. ἥν ῥά τε Πασιφάη κούρη τέκεν Ἠελίοιο. 3.1000. ἀλλʼ ἡ μὲν καὶ νηός, ἐπεὶ χόλον εὔνασε Μίνως 3.1001. σὺν τῷ ἐφεζομένη πάτρην λίπε· τὴν δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ 3.1002. ἀθάνατοι φίλαντο, μέσῳ δέ οἱ αἰθέρι τέκμαρ 3.1003. ἀστερόεις στέφανος, τόν τε κλείουσʼ Ἀριάδνης 3.1004. πάννυχος οὐρανίοισιν ἑλίσσεται εἰδώλοισιν. 3.1074. ἦε καὶ Αἰαίης νήσου πέλας; εἰπὲ δὲ κούρην 3.1075. ἥντινα τήνδʼ ὀνόμηνας ἀριγνώτην γεγαυῖαν 3.1076. Πασιφάης, ἣ πατρὸς ὁμόγνιός ἐστιν ἐμεῖο.’ 3.1096. ἀλλὰ τίη τάδε τοι μεταμώνια πάντʼ ἀγορεύω 3.1097. ἡμετέρους τε δόμους τηλεκλείτην τʼ Ἀριάδνην 3.1098. κούρην Μίνωος, τόπερ ἀγλαὸν οὔνομα κείνην 3.1099. παρθενικὴν καλέεσκον ἐπήρατον, ἥν μʼ ἐρεείνεις; 3.1100. αἴθε γάρ, ὡς Θησῆι τότε ξυναρέσσατο Μίνως 3.1101. ἀμφʼ αὐτῆς, ὧς ἄμμι πατὴρ τεὸς ἄρθμιος εἴη.’ 3.1132. ἔμπης δʼ ἔργʼ ἀίδηλα κατερρίγησεν ἰδέσθαι. 4.121. Ἑρμείας πρόφρων ξυμβλήμενος. ἔνθʼ ἄρα τούσγε 4.421. ὧς τώγε ξυμβάντε μέγαν δόλον ἠρτύνοντο 4.422. Ἀψύρτῳ, καὶ πολλὰ πόρον ξεινήια δῶρα 4.423. οἷς μέτα καὶ πέπλον δόσαν ἱερὸν Ὑψιπυλείης 4.424. πορφύρεον. τὸν μέν ῥα Διωνύσῳ κάμον αὐταὶ 4.425. δίῃ ἐν ἀμφιάλῳ Χάριτες θεαί· αὐτὰρ ὁ παιδὶ 4.426. δῶκε Θόαντι μεταῦτις· ὁ δʼ αὖ λίπεν Ὑψιπυλείῃ· 4.427. ἡ δʼ ἔπορʼ Αἰσονίδῃ πολέσιν μετὰ καὶ τὸ φέρεσθαι 4.428. γλήνεσιν εὐεργὲς ξεινήιον. οὔ μιν ἀφάσσων 4.429. οὔτε κεν εἰσορόων γλυκὺν ἵμερον ἐμπλήσειας. 4.430. τοῦ δὲ καὶ ἀμβροσίη ὀδμὴ πέλεν ἐξέτι κείνου 4.431. ἐξ οὗ ἄναξ αὐτὸς Νυσήιος ἐγκατελεκτο 4.432. ἀκροχάλιξ οἴνῳ καὶ νέκταρι, καλὰ μεμαρπὼς 4.433. στήθεα παρθενικῆς Μινωίδος, ἥν ποτε Θησεὺς 4.434. Κνωσσόθεν ἑσπομένην Δίῃ ἔνι κάλλιπε νήσῳ. 4.435. ἡ δʼ ὅτε κηρύκεσσιν ἐπεξυνώσατο μύθους 4.436. θελγέμεν, εὖτʼ ἂν πρῶτα θεᾶς περὶ νηὸν ἵκηται 4.437. συνθεσίῃ, νυκτός τε μέλαν κνέφας ἀμφιβάλῃσιν 4.438. ἐλθέμεν, ὄφρα δόλον συμφράσσεται, ὥς κεν ἑλοῦσα 4.439. χρύσειον μέγα κῶας ὑπότροπος αὖτις ὀπίσσω 4.440. βαίη ἐς Αἰήταο δόμους· πέρι γάρ μιν ἀνάγκῃ 4.441. υἱῆες Φρίξοιο δόσαν ξείνοισιν ἄγεσθαι· 4.442. τοῖα παραιφαμένη θελκτήρια φάρμακʼ ἔπασσεν 4.443. αἰθέρι καὶ πνοιῇσι, τά κεν καὶ ἄπωθεν ἐόντα 4.444. ἄγριον ἠλιβάτοιο κατʼ οὔρεος ἤγαγε θῆρα. 4.789. νῦν δὲ παρὰ Σκύλλης σκόπελον μέγαν ἠδὲ Χάρυβδιν 4.790. δεινὸν ἐρευγομένην δέχεται ὁδός. ἀλλά σε γὰρ δὴ 4.791. ἐξέτι νηπυτίης αὐτὴ τρέφον ἠδʼ ἀγάπησα 4.792. ἔξοχον ἀλλάων, αἵ τʼ εἰν ἁλὶ ναιετάουσιν 4.793. οὕνεκεν οὐκ ἔτλης εὐνῇ Διὸς ἱεμένοιο 4.794. λέξασθαι. κείνῳ γὰρ ἀεὶ τάδε ἔργα μέμηλεν 4.795. ἠὲ σὺν ἀθανάταις ἠὲ θνητῇσιν ἰαύειν. 4.796. ἀλλʼ ἐμὲ αἰδομένη καὶ ἐνὶ φρεσὶ δειμαίνουσα 4.797. ἠλεύω· ὁ δʼ ἔπειτα πελώριον ὅρκον ὄμοσσεν 4.798. μήποτέ σʼ ἀθανάτοιο θεοῦ καλέεσθαι ἄκοιτιν. 4.799. ἔμπης δʼ οὐ μεθίεσκεν ὀπιπεύων ἀέκουσαν 4.800. εἰσότε οἱ πρέσβειρα Θέμις κατέλεξεν ἅπαντα 4.801. ὡς δή τοι πέπρωται ἀμείνονα πατρὸς ἑοῖο 4.802. παῖδα τεκεῖν· τῶ καί σε λιλαιόμενος μεθέηκεν 4.803. δείματι, μή τις ἑοῦ ἀντάξιος ἄλλος ἀνάσσοι 4.804. ἀθανάτων, ἀλλʼ αἰὲν ἑὸν κράτος εἰρύοιτο. 4.805. αὐτὰρ ἐγὼ τὸν ἄριστον ἐπιχθονίων πόσιν εἶναι 4.806. δῶκά τοι, ὄφρα γάμου θυμηδέος ἀντιάσειας 4.807. τέκνα τε φιτύσαιο· θεοὺς δʼ ἐς δαῖτʼ ἐκάλεσσα 4.808. πάντας ὁμῶς· αὐτὴ δὲ σέλας χείρεσσιν ἀνέσχον 4.809. νυμφίδιον, κείνης ἀγανόφρονος εἵνεκα τιμῆς. 4.810. ἀλλʼ ἄγε καί τινά τοι νημερτέα μῦθον ἐνίψω. 4.811. εὖτʼ ἂν ἐς Ἠλύσιον πεδίον τεὸς υἱὸς ἵκηται 4.812. ὃν δὴ νῦν Χείρωνος ἐν ἤθεσι Κενταύροιο 4.813. νηιάδες κομέουσι τεοῦ λίπτοντα γάλακτος 4.814. χρειώ μιν κούρης πόσιν ἔμμεναι Αἰήταο 4.815. Μηδείης· σὺ δʼ ἄρηγε νυῷ ἑκυρή περ ἐοῦσα 4.816. ἠδʼ αὐτῷ Πηλῆι. τί τοι χόλος ἐστήρικται; 4.817. ἀάσθη. καὶ γάρ τε θεοὺς ἐπινίσσεται ἄτη. 4.818. ναὶ μὲν ἐφημοσύνῃσιν ἐμαῖς Ἥφαιστον ὀίω 4.819. λωφήσειν πρήσοντα πυρὸς μένος, Ἱπποτάδην δὲ 4.820. Αἴολον ὠκείας ἀνέμων ἄικας ἐρύξειν 4.821. νόσφιν ἐυσταθέος ζεφύρου, τείως κεν ἵκωνται 4.822. Φαιήκων λιμένας· σὺ δʼ ἀκηδέα μήδεο νόστον. 4.823. δεῖμα δέ τοι πέτραι καὶ ὑπέρβια κύματʼ ἔασιν 4.824. μοῦνον, ἅ κεν τρέψαιο κασιγνήτῃσι σὺν ἄλλαις. 4.825. μηδὲ σύγʼ ἠὲ Χάρυβδιν ἀμηχανέοντας ἐάσῃς 4.826. ἐσβαλέειν, μὴ πάντας ἀναβρόξασα φέρῃσιν 4.827. ἠὲ παρὰ Σκύλλης στυγερὸν κευθμῶνα νέεσθαι 4.828. Σκύλλης Αὐσονίης ὀλοόφρονος, ἣν τέκε Φόρκυι 4.829. νυκτιπόλος Ἑκάτη, τήν τε κλείουσι Κράταιιν 4.830. μή πως σμερδαλέῃσιν ἐπαΐξασα γένυσσιν 4.831. λεκτοὺς ἡρώων δηλήσεται. ἀλλʼ ἔχε νῆα 4.832. κεῖσʼ, ὅθι περ τυτθή γε παραίβασις ἔσσετʼ ὀλέθρου.’ 4.982. ἔστι δέ τις πορθμοῖο παροιτέρη Ἰονίοιο 4.983. ἀμφιλαφὴς πίειρα Κεραυνίῃ εἰν ἁλὶ νῆσος 4.984. ᾗ ὕπο δὴ κεῖσθαι δρέπανον φάτις--ἵλατε Μοῦσαι 4.985. οὐκ ἐθέλων ἐνέπω προτέρων ἔπος--ᾧ ἀπὸ πατρὸς 4.986. μήδεα νηλειῶς ἔταμεν Κρόνος· οἱ δέ ἑ Δηοῦς 4.987. κλείουσι χθονίης καλαμητόμον ἔμμεναι ἅρπην. 4.988. Δηὼ γὰρ κείνῃ ἐνὶ δή ποτε νάσσατο γαίῃ 4.989. Τιτῆνας δʼ ἔδαε στάχυν ὄμπνιον ἀμήσασθαι 4.990. Μάκριδα φιλαμένη. Δρεπάνη τόθεν ἐκλήισται 4.991. οὔνομα, Φαιήκων ἱερὴ τροφός· ὧς δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ 4.992. αἵματος Οὐρανίοιο γένος Φαίηκες ἔασιν. 4.993. τοὺς Ἀργὼ πολέεσσιν ἐνισχομένη καμάτοισιν 4.994. Θρινακίης αὔρῃς ἵκετʼ ἐξ ἁλός· οἱ δʼ ἀγανῇσιν 4.995. Ἀλκίνοος λαοί τε θυηπολίῃσιν ἰόντας 4.996. δειδέχατʼ ἀσπασίως· ἐπὶ δέ σφισι καγχαλάασκεν 4.997. πᾶσα πόλις· φαίης κεν ἑοῖς ἐπὶ παισὶ γάνυσθαι. 4.998. καὶ δʼ αὐτοὶ ἥρωες ἀνὰ πληθὺν κεχάροντο 4.999. τῷ ἴκελοι, οἷόν τε μεσαιτάτῃ ἐμβεβαῶτες 4.1000. Αἱμονίῃ· μέλλον δὲ βοῇ ἔνι θωρήξεσθαι· 4.1001. ὧδε μάλʼ ἀγχίμολον στρατὸς ἄσπετος ἐξεφαάνθη 4.1002. Κόλχων, οἳ Πόντοιο κατὰ στόμα καὶ διὰ πέτρας 4.1003. Κυανέας μαστῆρες ἀριστήων ἐπέρησαν. 4.1004. Μήδειαν δʼ ἔξαιτον ἑοῦ ἐς πατρὸς ἄγεσθαι 4.1005. ἵεντʼ ἀπροφάτως, ἠὲ στονόεσσαν ἀυτὴν 4.1006. νωμήσειν χαλεπῇσιν ὁμόκλεον ἀτροπίῃσιν 4.1007. αὖθί τε καὶ μετέπειτα σὺν Αἰήταο κελεύθῳ. 4.1008. ἀλλά σφεας κατέρυκεν ἐπειγομένους πολέμοιο 4.1009. κρείων Ἀλκίνοος. λελίητο γὰρ ἀμφοτέροισιν 4.1010. δηιοτῆτος ἄνευθεν ὑπέρβια νείκεα λῦσαι. 4.1011. κούρη δʼ οὐλομένῳ ὑπὸ δείματι πολλὰ μὲν αὐτοὺς 4.1012. Αἰσονίδεω ἑτάρους μειλίσσετο, πολλὰ δὲ χερσὶν 4.1013. Ἀρήτης γούνων ἀλόχου θίγεν Ἀλκινόοιο· 4.1014. ‘γουνοῦμαι, βασίλεια· σὺ δʼ ἵλαθι, μηδέ με Κόλχοις 4.1015. ἐκδώῃς ᾧ πατρὶ κομιζέμεν, εἴ νυ καὶ αὐτὴ 4.1016. ἀνθρώπων γενεῆς μία φέρβεαι, οἷσιν ἐς ἄτην 4.1017. ὠκύτατος κούφῃσι θέει νόος ἀμπλακίῃσιν. 4.1018. ὡς ἐμοὶ ἐκ πυκιναὶ ἔπεσον φρένες, οὐ μὲν ἕκητι 4.1019. μαργοσύνης. ἴστω δʼ ἱερὸν φάος Ἠελίοιο 4.1020. ἴστω νυκτιπόλου Περσηίδος ὄργια κούρης 4.1021. μὴ μὲν ἐγὼν ἐθέλουσα σὺν ἀνδράσιν ἀλλοδαποῖσιν 4.1022. κεῖθεν ἀφωρμήθην· στυγερὸν δέ με τάρβος ἔπεισεν 4.1023. τῆσγε φυγῆς μνήσασθαι, ὅτʼ ἤλιτον· οὐδέ τις ἄλλη 4.1024. μῆτις ἔην. ἔτι μοι μίτρη μένει, ὡς ἐνὶ πατρὸς 4.1025. δώμασιν, ἄχραντος καὶ ἀκήρατος. ἀλλʼ ἐλέαιρε 4.1026. πότνα, τεόν τε πόσιν μειλίσσεο· σοὶ δʼ ὀπάσειαν 4.1027. ἀθάνατοι βίοτόν τε τελεσφόρον ἀγλαΐην τε 4.1028. καὶ παῖδας καὶ κῦδος ἀπορθήτοιο πόληος.’ 4.1029. τοῖα μὲν Ἀρήτην γουνάζετο δάκρυ χέουσα· 4.1030. τοῖα δʼ ἀριστήων ἐπαμοιβαδὶς ἄνδρα ἕκαστον· 4.1031. ‘ὑμέων, ὦ πέρι δὴ μέγα φέρτατοι, ἀμφί τʼ ἀέθλοις 4.1032. ὧν κάμον ὑμετέροισιν, ἀτύζομαι· ἧς ἰότητι 4.1033. ταύρους τʼ ἐζεύξασθε, καὶ ἐκ θέρος οὐλοὸν ἀνδρῶν 4.1034. κείρατε γηγενέων· ἧς εἵνεκεν Αἱμονίηνδε 4.1035. χρύσεον αὐτίκα κῶας ἀνάξετε νοστήσαντες. 4.1036. ἥδʼ ἐγώ, ἣ πάτρην τε καὶ οὓς ὤλεσσα τοκῆας 4.1037. ἣ δόμον, ἣ σύμπασαν ἐυφροσύνην βιότοιο· 4.1038. ὔμμι δὲ καὶ πάτρην καὶ δώματα ναιέμεν αὖτις 4.1039. ἤνυσα· καὶ γλυκεροῖσιν ἔτʼ εἰσόψεσθε τοκῆας 4.1040. ὄμμασιν· αὐτὰρ ἐμοὶ ἀπὸ δὴ βαρὺς εἵλετο δαίμων 4.1041. ἀγλαΐας· στυγερὴ δὲ σὺν ὀθνείοις ἀλάλημαι. 4.1042. δείσατε συνθεσίας τε καὶ ὅρκια, δείσατʼ Ἐρινὺν 4.1043. Ἱκεσίην, νέμεσίν τε θεῶν, ἐς χεῖρας ἰοῦσαν 4.1044. Αἰήτεω λώβῃ πολυπήμονι δῃωθῆναι. 4.1045. οὐ νηούς, οὐ πύργον ἐπίρροθον, οὐκ ἀλεωρὴν 4.1046. ἄλλην, οἰόθι δὲ προτιβάλλομαι ὑμέας αὐτους. 4.1047. σχέτλιοι ἀτροπίης καὶ ἀνηλέες· οὐδʼ ἐνὶ θυμῷ 4.1048. αἰδεῖσθε ξείνης μʼ ἐπὶ γούνατα χεῖρας ἀνάσσης 4.1049. δερκόμενοι τείνουσαν ἀμήχανον· ἀλλά κε πᾶσιν 4.1050. κῶας ἑλεῖν μεμαῶτες, ἐμίξατε δούρατα Κόλχοις 4.1051. αὐτῷ τʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι· νῦν δʼ ἐλάθεσθε 4.1052. ἠνορέης, ὅτε μοῦνοι ἀποτμηγέντες ἔασιν.’ 4.1053. ὧς φάτο λισσομένη· τῶν δʼ ὅντινα γουνάζοιτο 4.1054. ὅς μιν θαρσύνεσκεν ἐρητύων ἀχέουσαν. 4.1055. σεῖον δʼ ἐγχείας εὐήκεας ἐν παλάμῃσιν 4.1056. φάσγανά τʼ ἐκ κολεῶν. οὐδὲ σχήσεσθαι ἀρωγῆς 4.1057. ἔννεπον, εἴ κε δίκης ἀλιτήμονος ἀντιάσειεν. 4.1058. στρευγομένοις δʼ ἀνʼ ὅμιλον ἐπήλυθεν εὐνήτειρα 4.1059. νὺξ ἔργων ἄνδρεσσι, κατευκήλησε δὲ πᾶσαν 4.1060. γαῖαν ὁμῶς· τὴν δʼ οὔτι μίνυνθά περ εὔνασεν ὕπνος 4.1061. ἀλλά οἱ ἐν στέρνοις ἀχέων εἱλίσσετο θυμός. 4.1062. οἷον ὅτε κλωστῆρα γυνὴ ταλαεργὸς ἑλίσσει 4.1063. ἐννυχίη· τῇ δʼ ἀμφὶ κινύρεται ὀρφανὰ τέκνα 4.1064. χηροσύνῃ πόσιος· σταλάει δʼ ὑπὸ δάκρυ παρειὰς 4.1065. μνωομένης, οἵη μιν ἐπὶ σμυγερὴ λάβεν αἶσα· 4.1066. ὧς τῆς ἰκμαίνοντο παρηίδες· ἐν δέ οἱ ἦτορ 4.1067. ὀξείῃς εἰλεῖτο πεπαρμένον ἀμφʼ ὀδύνῃσιν. 4.1068. τὼ δʼ ἔντοσθε δόμοιο κατὰ πτόλιν, ὡς τὸ πάροιθεν 4.1069. κρείων Ἀλκίνοος πολυπότνιά τʼ Ἀλκινόοιο 4.1070. Ἀρήτη ἄλοχος, κούρης πέρι μητιάασκον 4.1071. οἷσιν ἐνὶ λεχέεσσι διὰ κνέφας· οἷα δʼ ἀκοίτην 4.1072. κουρίδιον θαλεροῖσι δάμαρ προσπτύσσετο μύθοις· 4.1073. ‘ναὶ φίλος, εἰ δʼ ἄγε μοι πολυκηδέα ῥύεο Κόλχων 4.1074. παρθενικήν, Μινύῃσι φέρων χάριν. ἐγγύθι δʼ Ἄργος 4.1075. ἡμετέρης νήσοιο καὶ ἀνέρες Αἱμονιῆες· 4.1076. Αἰήτης δʼ οὔτʼ ἂρ ναίει σχεδόν, οὐδέ τι ἴδμεν 4.1077. Αἰήτην, ἀλλʼ οἶον ἀκούομεν· ἥδε δὲ κούρη 4.1078. αἰνοπαθὴς κατά μοι νόον ἔκλασεν ἀντιόωσα. 4.1079. μή μιν, ἄναξ, Κόλχοισι πόροις ἐς πατρὸς ἄγεσθαι. 4.1080. ἀάσθη, ὅτε πρῶτα βοῶν θελκτήρια δῶκεν 4.1081. φάρμακά οἱ· σχεδόθεν δὲ κακῷ κακόν, οἷά τε πολλὰ 4.1082. ῥέζομεν ἀμπλακίῃσιν, ἀκειομένη ὑπάλυξεν 4.1083. πατρὸς ὑπερφιάλοιο βαρὺν χόλον. αὐτὰρ Ἰήσων 4.1084. ὡς ἀίω, μεγάλοισιν ἐνίσχεται ἐξ ἕθεν ὅρκοις 4.1085. κουριδίην θήσεσθαι ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἄκοιτιν 4.1086. τῶ, φίλε, μήτʼ οὖν αὐτὸν ἑκὼν ἐπίορκον ὀμόσσαι 4.1087. θείης Αἰσονίδην, μήτʼ ἄσχετα σεῖο ἕκητι 4.1088. παῖδα πατὴρ θυμῷ κεκοτηότι δηλήσαιτο. 4.1089. λίην γὰρ δύσζηλοι ἑαῖς ἐπὶ παισὶ τοκῆες· 4.1090. οἷα μὲν Ἀντιόπην εὐώπιδα μήσατο Νυκτεύς· 4.1091. οἷα δὲ καὶ Δανάη πόντῳ ἔνι πήματʼ ἀνέτλη 4.1092. πατρὸς ἀτασθαλίῃσι· νέον γε μέν, οὐδʼ ἀποτηλοῦ 4.1093. ὑβριστὴς Ἔχετος γλήναις ἔνι χάλκεα κέντρα 4.1094. πῆξε θυγατρὸς ἑῆς· στονόεντι δὲ κάρφεται οἴτῳ 4.1095. ὀρφναίῃ ἐνὶ χαλκὸν ἀλετρεύουσα καλιῇ.’ 4.1096. ὧς ἔφατʼ ἀντομένη· τοῦ δὲ φρένες ἰαίνοντυ 4.1097. ἧς ἀλόχου μύθοισιν, ἔπος δʼ ἐπὶ τοῖον ἔειπεν· 4.1098. ‘Ἀρήτη, καί κεν σὺν τεύχεσιν ἐξελάσαιμι 4.1099. Κόλχους, ἡρώεσσι φέρων χάριν, εἵνεκα κούρης. 4.1100. ἀλλὰ Διὸς δείδοικα δίκην ἰθεῖαν ἀτίσσαι. 4.1101. οὐδὲ μὲν Αἰήτην ἀθεριζέμεν, ὡς ἀγορεύεις 4.1102. λώιον· οὐ γάρ τις βασιλεύτερος Αἰήταο. 4.1103. καί κʼ ἐθέλων, ἕκαθέν περ, ἐφʼ Ἑλλάδι νεῖκος ἄγοιτο. 4.1104. τῶ μʼ ἐπέοικε δίκην, ἥτις μετὰ πᾶσιν ἀρίστη 4.1105. ἔσσεται ἀνθρώποισι, δικαζέμεν· οὐδέ σε κεύσω. 4.1106. παρθενικὴν μὲν ἐοῦσαν ἑῷ ἀπὸ πατρὶ κομίσσαι 4.1107. ἰθύνω· λέκτρον δὲ σὺν ἀνέρι πορσαίνουσαν 4.1108. οὔ μιν ἑοῦ πόσιος νοσφίσσομαι· οὐδέ, γενέθλην 4.1109. εἴ τινʼ ὑπὸ σπλάγχνοισι φέρει, δῄοισιν ὀπάσσω.’ 4.1110. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· καὶ τὸν μέν ἐπισχεδὸν εὔνασεν ὕπνος. 4.1111. ἡ δʼ ἔπος ἐν θυμῷ πυκινὸν βάλετʼ· αὐτίκα δʼ ὦρτο 4.1112. ἐκ λεχέων ἀνὰ δῶμα· συνήιξαν δὲ γυναῖκες 4.1113. ἀμφίπολοι, δέσποιναν ἑὴν μέτα ποιπνύουσαι. 4.1114. σῖγα δʼ ἑὸν κήρυκα καλεσσαμένη προσέειπεν 4.1115. ᾗσιν ἐπιφροσύνῃσιν ἐποτρυνέουσα μιγῆναι 4.1116. Αἰσονίδην κούρῃ, μηδʼ Ἀλκίνοον βασιλῆα 4.1117. λίσσεσθαι· τὸ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἰὼν Κόλχοισι δικάσσει 4.1118. παρθενικὴν μὲν ἐοῦσαν ἑοῦ ποτὶ δώματα πατρὸς 4.1119. ἐκδώσειν, λέκτρον δὲ σὺν ἀνέρι πορσαίνουσαν 4.1120. οὐκέτι κουριδίης μιν ἀποτμήξειν φιλότητος. 4.1121. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· τὸν δʼ αἶψα πόδες φέρον ἐκ μεγάροιο 4.1122. ὥς κεν Ἰήσονι μῦθον ἐναίσιμον ἀγγείλειεν 4.1123. Ἀρήτης βουλάς τε θεουδέος Ἀλκινόοιο. 4.1124. τοὺς δʼ εὗρεν παρὰ νηὶ σὺν ἔντεσιν ἐγρήσσοντας 4.1125. Ὑλλικῷ ἐν λιμένι, σχεδὸν ἄστεος· ἐκ δʼ ἄρα πᾶσαν 4.1126. πέφραδεν ἀγγελίην· γήθησε δὲ θυμὸς ἑκάστου 4.1127. ἡρώων· μάλα γάρ σφιν ἑαδότα μῦθον ἔειπεν. 4.1128. αὐτίκα δὲ κρητῆρα κερασσάμενοι μακάρεσσιν 4.1129. ἣ θέμις, εὐαγέως ἐπιβώμια μῆλʼ ἐρύσαντες 4.1130. αὐτονυχὶ κούρῃ θαλαμήιον ἔντυον εὐνὴν 4.1131. ἄντρῳ ἐν ἠγαθέῳ, τόθι δή ποτε Μάκρις ἔναιεν 4.1132. κούρη Ἀρισταίοιο μελίφρονος, ὅς ῥα μελισσέων 4.1133. ἔργα πολυκμήτοιό τʼ ἀνεύρατο πῖαρ ἐλαίης. 4.1134. κείνη δὴ πάμπρωτα Διὸς Νυσήιον υἷα 4.1135. Εὐβοίης ἔντοσθεν Ἀβαντίδος ᾧ ἐνὶ κόλπῳ 4.1136. δέξατο, καὶ μέλιτι ξηρὸν περὶ χεῖλος ἔδευσεν 4.1137. εὖτέ μιν Ἑρμείας φέρεν ἐκ πυρός· ἔδρακε δʼ Ἥρη 4.1138. καί ἑ χολωσαμένη πάσης ἐξήλασε νήσου. 4.1139. ἡ δʼ ἄρα Φαιήκων ἱερῷ ἐνὶ τηλόθεν ἄντρῳ 4.1140. νάσσατο, καὶ πόρεν ὄλβον ἀθέσφατον ἐνναέτῃσιν. 4.1141. ἔνθα τότʼ ἐστόρεσαν λέκτρον μέγα· τοῖο δʼ ὕπερθεν 4.1142. χρύσεον αἰγλῆεν κῶας βάλον, ὄφρα πέλοιτο 4.1143. τιμήεις τε γάμος καὶ ἀοίδιμος. ἄνθεα δέ σφιν 4.1144. νύμφαι ἀμεργόμεναι λευκοῖς ἐνὶ ποικίλα κόλποις 4.1145. ἐσφόρεον· πάσας δὲ πυρὸς ὣς ἄμφεπεν αἴγλη· 4.1146. τοῖον ἀπὸ χρυσέων θυσάνων ἀμαρύσσετο φέγγος. 4.1147. δαῖε δʼ ἐν ὀφθαλμοῖς γλυκερὸν πόθον· ἴσχε δʼ ἑκάστην 4.1148. αἰδὼς ἱεμένην περ ὅμως ἐπὶ χεῖρα βαλέσθαι. 4.1149. αἱ μέν τʼ Αἰγαίου ποταμοῦ καλέοντο θύγατρες· 4.1150. αἱ δʼ ὄρεος κορυφὰς Μελιτηίου ἀμφενέμοντο· 4.1151. αἱ δʼ ἔσαν ἐκ πεδίων ἀλσηίδες. ὦρσε γὰρ αὐτὴ 4.1152. Ἥρη Ζηνὸς ἄκοιτις, Ἰήσονα κυδαίνουσα. 4.1153. κεῖνο καὶ εἰσέτι νῦν ἱερὸν κληίζεται ἄντρον 4.1154. Μηδείης, ὅθι τούσγε σὺν ἀλλήλοισιν ἔμιξαν 4.1155. τεινάμεναι ἑανοὺς εὐώδεας. οἱ δʼ ἐνὶ χερσὶν 4.1156. δούρατα νωμήσαντες ἀρήια, μὴ πρὶν ἐς ἀλκὴν 4.1157. δυσμενέων ἀίδηλος ἐπιβρίσειεν ὅμιλος 4.1158. κράατα δʼ εὐφύλλοις ἐστεμμένοι ἀκρεμόνεσσιν 4.1160. νυμφιδίαις ὑμέναιον ἐπὶ προμολῇσιν ἄειδον. 4.1161. οὐ μὲν ἐν Ἀλκινόοιο γάμον μενέαινε τελέσσαι 4.1162. ἥρως Αἰσονίδης, μεγάροις δʼ ἐνὶ πατρὸς ἑοῖο 4.1163. νοστήσας ἐς Ἰωλκὸν ὑπότροπος· ὧς δὲ καὶ αὐτὴ 4.1164. Μήδεια φρονέεσκε· τότʼ αὖ χρεὼ ἦγε μιγῆναι. 4.1165. ἀλλὰ γὰρ οὔποτε φῦλα δυηπαθέων ἀνθρώπων 4.1166. τερπωλῆς ἐπέβημεν ὅλῳ ποδί· σὺν δέ τις αἰεὶ 4.1167. πικρὴ παρμέμβλωκεν ἐυφροσύνῃσιν ἀνίη. 4.1168. τῶ καὶ τοὺς γλυκερῇ περ ἰαινομένους φιλότητι 4.1169. δεῖμʼ ἔχεν, εἰ τελέοιτο διάκρισις Ἀλκινόοιο. 4.1170. Ἠὼς δʼ ἀμβροσίοισιν ἀνερχομένη φαέεσσιν 4.1171. λῦε κελαινὴν νύκτα διʼ ἠέρος· αἱ δʼ ἐγέλασσαν 4.1172. ἠιόνες νήσοιο καὶ ἑρσήεσσαι ἄπωθεν 4.1173. ἀτραπιτοὶ πεδίων· ἐν δὲ θρόος ἔσκεν ἀγυιαῖς· 4.1174. κίνυντʼ ἐνναέται μὲν ἀνὰ πτόλιν, οἱ δʼ ἀποτηλοῦ 4.1175. Κόλχοι Μακριδίης ἐπὶ πείρασι χερνήσοιο. 4.1176. αὐτίκα δʼ Ἀλκίνοος μετεβήσετο συνθεσίῃσιν 4.1177. ὃν νόον ἐξερέων κούρης ὕπερ· ἐν δʼ ὅγε χειρὶ 4.1178. σκῆπτρον ἔχεν χρυσοῖο δικασπόλον, ᾧ ὕπο λαοὶ 4.1179. ἰθείας ἀνὰ ἄστυ διεκρίνοντο θέμιστας. 4.1180. τῷ δὲ καὶ ἑξείης πολεμήια τεύχεα δύντες 4.1181. Φαιήκων οἱ ἄριστοι ὁμιλαδὸν ἐστιχόωντο. 4.1182. ἥρωας δὲ γυναῖκες ἀολλέες ἔκτοθι πύργων 4.1183. βαῖνον ἐποψόμεναι· σὺν δʼ ἀνέρες ἀγροιῶται 4.1184. ἤντεον εἰσαΐοντες, ἐπεὶ νημερτέα βάξιν 4.1185. Ἥρη ἐπιπροέηκεν. ἄγεν δʼ ὁ μὲν ἔκκριτον ἄλλων 4.1186. ἀρνειὸν μήλων, ὁ δʼ ἀεργηλὴν ἔτι πόρϝιν· 4.1187. ἄλλοι δʼ ἀμφιφορῆας ἐπισχεδὸν ἵστασαν οἴνου 4.1188. κίρνασθαι· θυέων δʼ ἀποϝηλόθι κήκιε λιγνύς. 4.1189. αἱ δὲ πολυκμήτους ἑανοὺς φέρον, οἷα γυναῖκες 4.1190. μείλιά τε χρυσοῖο καὶ ἀλλοίην ἐπὶ τοῖσιν 4.1191. ἀγλαΐην, οἵην τε νεόζυγες ἐντύνονται· 4.1192. θάμβευν δʼ εἰσορόωσαι ἀριπρεπέων ἡρώων 4.1193. εἴδεα καὶ μορφάς, ἐν δέ σφισιν Οἰάγροιο 4.1194. υἱὸν ὑπαὶ φόρμιγγος ἐυκρέκτου καὶ ἀοιδῆς 4.1195. ταρφέα σιγαλόεντι πέδον κροτέοντα πεδίλῳ. 4.1196. νύμφαι δʼ ἄμμιγα πᾶσαι, ὅτε μνήσαιτο γάμοιο 4.1197. ἱμερόενθʼ ὑμέναιον ἀνήπυον· ἄλλοτε δʼ αὖτε 4.1198. οἰόθεν οἶαι ἄειδον ἑλισσόμεναι περὶ κύκλον 4.1199. Ἥρη, σεῖο ἕκητι· σὺ γὰρ καὶ ἐπὶ φρεσὶ θῆκας 4.1200. Ἀρήτῃ, πυκινὸν φάσθαι ἔπος Ἀλκινόοιο. 4.1201. αὐτὰρ ὅγʼ ὡς τὰ πρῶτα δίκης ἀνὰ πείρατʼ ἔειπεν 4.1202. ἰθείης, ἤδη δὲ γάμου τέλος ἐκλήιστο 4.1203. ἔμπεδον ὧς ἀλέγυνε διαμπερές· οὐδέ ἑ τάρβος 4.1204. οὐλοόν, οὐδὲ βαρεῖαι ἐπήλυθον Αἰήταο 4.1205. μήνιες, ἀρρήκτοισι δʼ ἐνιζεύξας ἔχεν ὅρκοις. 4.1206. τῶ καὶ ὅτʼ ἠλεμάτως Κόλχοι μάθον ἀντιόωντες 4.1207. καί σφεας ἠὲ θέμιστας ἑὰς εἴρυσθαι ἄνωγεν 4.1208. ἢ λιμένων γαίης τʼ ἀποτηλόθι νῆας ἐέργειν 4.1209. δὴ τότε μιν βασιλῆος ἑοῦ τρομέοντας ἐνιπὰς 4.1210. δέχθαι μειλίξαντο συνήμονας· αὖθι δὲ νήσῳ 4.1211. δὴν μάλα Φαιήκεσσι μετʼ ἀνδράσι ναιετάασκον 4.1212. εἰσότε Βακχιάδαι, γενεὴν Ἐφύρηθεν ἐόντες 4.1213. ἀνέρες ἐννάσσαντο μετὰ χρόνον· οἱ δὲ περαίην 4.1214. νῆσον ἔβαν· κεῖθεν δὲ Κεραύνια μέλλον Ἀβάντων 4.1215. οὔρεα, Νεσταίους τε καὶ Ὤρικον εἰσαφικέσθαι· 4.1216. ἀλλὰ τὰ μὲν στείχοντος ἄδην αἰῶνος ἐτύχθη. 4.1217. Μοιράων δʼ ἔτι κεῖσε θύη ἐπέτεια δέχονται 4.1218. καὶ Νυμφέων Νομίοιο καθʼ ἱερὸν Λ̓πόλλωνος 4.1219. βωμοί, τοὺς Μήδεια καθίσσατο. πολλὰ δʼ ἰοῦσιν 4.1220. Λ̓λκίνοος Μινύαις ξεινήια, πολλὰ δʼ ὄπασσεν 4.1221. Λ̓ρήτη· μετὰ δʼ αὖτε δυώδεκα δῶκεν ἕπεσθαι 4.1222. Μηδείῃ δμωὰς Φαιηκίδας ἐκ μεγάροιο. 4.1411. ‘δαίμονες ὦ καλαὶ καὶ ἐύφρονες, ἵλατʼ, ἄνασσαι 4.1412. εἴτʼ οὖν οὐρανίαις ἐναρίθμιοί ἐστε θεῇσιν 4.1413. εἴτε καταχθονίαις, εἴτʼ οἰοπόλοι καλέεσθε 4.1414. νύμφαι· ἴτʼ ὦ νύμφαι, ἱερὸν γένος Ὠκεανοῖο 4.1415. δείξατʼ ἐελδομένοισιν ἐνωπαδὶς ἄμμι φανεῖσαι 4.1416. ἤ τινα πετραίην χύσιν ὕδατος, ἤ τινα γαίης 4.1417. ἱερὸν ἐκβλύοντα, θεαί, ῥόον, ᾧ ἀπὸ δίψαν 4.1418. αἰθομένην ἄμοτον λωφήσομεν. εἰ δέ κεν αὖτις 4.1419. δή ποτʼ Ἀχαιίδα γαῖαν ἱκώμεθα ναυτιλίῃσιν 4.1420. δὴ τότε μυρία δῶρα μετὰ πρώτῃσι θεάων 4.1421. λοιβάς τʼ εἰλαπίνας τε παρέξομεν εὐμενέοντες.’ 4.1422. ὧς φάτο λισσόμενος ἀδινῇ ὀπί· ταὶ δʼ ἐλέαιρον 4.1548. κέκλετʼ Ἀπόλλωνος τρίποδα μέγαν ἔκτοθι νηὸς 4.1549. δαίμοσιν ἐγγενέταις νόστῳ ἔπι μείλια θέσθαι.
3. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 10.1-10.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 4.90-4.128, 4.160-4.172, 4.495 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.90. with many a votive gift; or, peering deep 4.91. into the victims' cloven sides, she read 4.92. the fate-revealing tokens trembling there. 4.93. How blind the hearts of prophets be! Alas! 4.94. of what avail be temples and fond prayers 4.95. to change a frenzied mind? Devouring ever 4.96. love's fire burns inward to her bones; she feels 4.97. quick in her breast the viewless, voiceless wound. 4.98. Ill-fated Dido ranges up and down 4.99. the spaces of her city, desperate 4.100. her life one flame—like arrow-stricken doe 4.101. through Cretan forest rashly wandering 4.102. pierced by a far-off shepherd, who pursues 4.103. with shafts, and leaves behind his light-winged steed 4.104. not knowing; while she scours the dark ravines 4.105. of Dicte and its woodlands; at her heart 4.106. the mortal barb irrevocably clings. 4.107. around her city's battlements she guides 4.108. aeneas, to make show of Sidon 's gold 4.109. and what her realm can boast; full oft her voice 4.110. essays to speak and frembling dies away: 4.111. or, when the daylight fades, she spreads anew 4.112. a royal banquet, and once more will plead 4.113. mad that she is, to hear the Trojan sorrow; 4.114. and with oblivious ravishment once more 4.115. hangs on his lips who tells; or when her guests 4.116. are scattered, and the wan moon's fading horn 4.117. bedims its ray, while many a sinking star 4.118. invites to slumber, there she weeps alone 4.119. in the deserted hall, and casts her down 4.120. on the cold couch he pressed. Her love from far 4.121. beholds her vanished hero and receives 4.122. his voice upon her ears; or to her breast 4.123. moved by a father's image in his child 4.124. he clasps Ascanius, seeking to deceive 4.125. her unblest passion so. Her enterprise 4.126. of tower and rampart stops: her martial host 4.127. no Ionger she reviews, nor fashions now 4.128. defensive haven and defiant wall; 4.160. a common city with the sons of Tyre 4.161. with mingling blood and sworn, perpetual peace. 4.162. His wife thou art; it is thy rightful due 4.163. to plead to know his mind. Go, ask him, then! 4.164. For humbly I obey!” With instant word 4.165. Juno the Queen replied: “Leave that to me! 4.166. But in what wise our urgent task and grave 4.167. may soon be sped, I will in brief unfold 4.168. to thine attending ear. A royal hunt 4.169. in sylvan shades unhappy Dido gives 4.170. for her Aeneas, when to-morrow's dawn 4.171. uplifts its earliest ray and Titan's beam 4.172. hall first unveil the world. But I will pour 4.495. and flaming stars arise, Anchises' shade
5. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.471-1.473, 4.85, 4.88-4.89, 5.333-5.351, 8.259-8.260, 8.401-8.402, 8.405-8.422 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 100
achilles Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
acrocorinth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
actaeon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
aeetes Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
aeneas, as lover of dido Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 47, 48
aeneas Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 100; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
agave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
aietes Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
alcinous Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
amphion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
antiope Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
aphrodite Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
apollo de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
apollonius of rhodes, argonautica, intertextual aspects, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
apollonius of rhodes, argonautica, intertextual aspects, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
apollonius of rhodes, argonautica Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137, 145
apollonius of rhodes Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 100
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
arete, queen of scheria Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
argonauts de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
ariadne Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
atamante Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
athena Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
autonoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
bacchiadae Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
cave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
choice Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
colchis, colchoi Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
colchis Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
corcyra Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
corinth, corinthian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
corinth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
cosmogony de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
dance de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
dido, as lover Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 48
dido Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 100; Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 47; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
dionysos, childhood Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
electra de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
ephyra Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
epimetheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
epopeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
eros, eros Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
ethical qualities, craftiness, deceit, deception, disguise, feigning, guile, sleight of hand, trickery (dolus, dolos) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
ethical qualities, stratagem, strategy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
euboea Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
eumelos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
euripides Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
europa character Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
foreshadowing Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
glaucus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
gods Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
golden fleece Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
harmonia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
hera, akraia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
hera Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
heraion, corcyra Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
hermes Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
hero Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
history Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
hypnos (sleep) Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
intertextuality, allusion, two-tier intertextuality, model Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137, 145
intertextuality, allusion Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
intertextuality, future reflexive mode Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
intertextuality, imitation Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
italy Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
iuno pronuba Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 47
jason Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 100; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210; Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 47, 48; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137, 145; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
juno Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
katapontismos' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
kings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
kithara de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
learchus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
leda Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
love, furtivus amor Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 48
love Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
love affair, of aeneas and dido Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 47, 48
lycurgus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
lyra de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
macris Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
marriage, jason and medea Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
marriage, of jason and medea Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 47, 48
marriage, weddings Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
marriage Cairns, Virgil's Augustan Epic (1989) 47, 48; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
medea Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 100; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210; Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137, 145; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
melikertes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
melissus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
music de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
nausicaa Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
nurse Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
oceanos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
odysseus, narrator Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
odysseus Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
offerings Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
orpheus, musician de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
orpheus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
ovid Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
phaeacians Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
plots Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
ploys Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
polydoros Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
promontory Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
punic wars ( Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
rhodes Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
rome, foundation of Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
sea-voyage Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
sex Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
song de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
stars de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
storm Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
story Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
supplication de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 320
theocritus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
thestius Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
thetis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 209
third ways Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137, 145
valerius flaccus fides in Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 100
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, argonautic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137, 145
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, iliadic Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
vergil, aeneid, intertextual identity, odyssean Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 137
virgil Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 193
wandering Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
zethus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210
zeus, in the argonautica Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
zeus, in the iliad Farrell, Juno's Aeneid: A Battle for Heroic Identity (2021) 145
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 210