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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1051
Apollonius Of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.556-3.566
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ὧς ηὔδα μεμαώς· πολέες δʼ ὁμάδησαν ἑταῖροι <Such were his eager words; and of his comrades many murmured low, but none uttered a word of answer back. And he sat down in wrath; and at once Jason roused them and uttered his own thought: "Let Argus set forth from the ship, since this pleases all; but we will now move from the river and openly fasten our hawsers to the shore. For surely it is not fitting for us to hide any longer cowering from the battle-cry.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.9-1.10, 1.12-1.13, 1.18-1.19, 1.24-1.45, 1.50-1.168, 1.176-1.177, 1.183-1.248, 1.254-1.273, 1.275-1.284, 1.287-1.290, 1.292-1.302, 2.235, 5.349, 5.406-5.415, 6.329, 6.492-6.493, 12.230-12.250, 22.159-22.161 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.9. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.10. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.12. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.13. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.18. /but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.19. /but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.24. /out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.25. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.26. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.27. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.28. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.29. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.30. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.31. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.32. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.33. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.34. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. So he spoke, and the old man was seized with fear and obeyed his word. He went forth in silence along the shore of the loud-resounding sea, and earnestly then, when he had gone apart, the old man prayed 1.35. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.36. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.37. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.38. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.39. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.40. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.41. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.42. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.43. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.44. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.45. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.50. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.51. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.52. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.53. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.54. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.55. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.56. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.57. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.58. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.59. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.60. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.61. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.62. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.63. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.64. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.65. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.66. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.67. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.68. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.69. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose Calchas son of Thestor, far the best of bird-diviners, who knew the things that were, and that were to be, and that had been before 1.70. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.71. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.72. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.73. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.74. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.75. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.76. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.77. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.78. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.79. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.80. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.81. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.82. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.83. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.84. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.85. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.86. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.87. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.88. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.89. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.90. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.91. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.92. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.93. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.94. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. Then the blameless seer took heart, and spoke:It is not then because of a vow that he finds fault, nor because of a hecatomb, but because of the priest whom Agamemnon dishonoured, and did not release his daughter nor accept the ransom. 1.95. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.96. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.97. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.98. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.99. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.100. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.101. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.102. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.103. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.104. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.105. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.106. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.107. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.108. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.109. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.110. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.111. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.112. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.113. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.114. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.115. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.116. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.117. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.118. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.119. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.120. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.121. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.122. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.123. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.124. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.125. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.126. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.127. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.128. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.129. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.130. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.131. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.132. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.133. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.134. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.135. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.136. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.137. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.138. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.139. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.140. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.141. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.142. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.143. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.144. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.145. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.146. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.147. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.148. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.149. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.150. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.151. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.152. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.153. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.154. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.155. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.156. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.157. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.158. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.159. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.160. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.161. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.162. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.165. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.166. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.167. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.176. /Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not 1.177. /Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not 1.183. /nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.184. /nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.185. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.186. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.187. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.188. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.189. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.190. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.191. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.192. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.193. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.194. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.195. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.196. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.223. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.225. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.226. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.227. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.228. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.229. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.230. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.231. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.232. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.233. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.234. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.235. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.236. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.237. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.238. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.239. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.240. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.241. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.242. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.243. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.244. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. So spoke the son of Peleus, and down to the earth he dashed 1.245. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.246. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.247. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.248. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.254. /who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.255. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.256. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.257. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.258. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.259. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.260. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.261. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.262. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.263. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.264. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.265. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.266. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.267. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.268. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.269. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.270. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.271. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.272. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.273. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.275. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.276. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.277. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.278. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.279. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.280. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.281. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.282. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.283. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.284. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.287. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.288. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.289. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.290. /do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me 1.297. /for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship 2.235. /Soft fools! base things of shame, ye women of Achaea, men no more, homeward let us go with our ships, and leave this fellow here in the land of Troy to digest his prizes, that so he may learn whether in us too there is aught of aid for him or no—for him that hath now done dishonour to Achilles, a man better far than he; 5.349. /and saved him in a dark cloud, lest any of the Danaans with swift horses might hurl a spear of bronze into his breast and take away his life. But over her shouted aloud Diomedes good at the war-cry:Keep thee away, daughter of Zeus, from war and fighting. Sufficeth it not that thou beguilest weakling women? 5.406. /And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.407. /And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.408. /And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.409. /And upon thee has the goddess, flashing-eyed Athene, set this man—fool that he is; for the heart of Tydeus' son knoweth not this, that verily he endureth not for long who fighteth with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he is come back from war and the dread conflict. 5.410. /Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she 5.411. /Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she 5.412. /Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she 5.413. /Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she 5.414. /Wherefore now let Tydeus' son, for all he is so mighty, beware lest one better than thou fight against him, lest in sooth Aegialeia, the daughter of Adrastus, passing wise, wake from sleep with her long lamentings all her household, as she wails for her wedded husband, the best man of the Achaeans, even she 5.415. /the stately wife of horse-taming Diomedes. 6.329. /And at sight of him Hector rebuked him with words of shame:Strange man, thou dost not well to nurse this anger in thy heart. Thy people are perishing about the town and the steep wall in battle, and it is because of thee that the battle-cry and the war are ablaze about this city; thou wouldest thyself vent wrath on any other 6.492. /Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 6.493. /Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 12.230. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.231. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.232. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.233. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.234. /Then with an angry glance from beneath his brows spake to him Hector of the flashing helm:Polydamas, this that thou sayest is no longer to my pleasure; yea, thou knowest how to devise better words than these. But if thou verily speakest thus in earnest, then of a surety have the gods themselves destroyed thy wits 12.235. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.236. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.237. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.238. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.239. /seeing thou biddest me forget the counsels of loud-thundering Zeus, that himself promised me and bowed his head thereto. But thou biddest us be obedient to birds long of wing, that I regard not, nor take thought thereof, whether they fare to the right, toward the Dawn and the sun 12.240. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.241. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.242. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.243. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.244. /or to the left toward the murky darkness. nay, for us, let us be obedient to the counsel of great Zeus, that is king over all mortals and immortals. One omen is best, to fight for one's country. Wherefore dost thou fear war and battle? 12.245. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.246. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.247. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.248. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.249. /For if the rest of us be slain one and all at the ships of the Argives, yet is there no fear that thou shouldest perish,—for thy heart is—not staunch in fight nor warlike. Howbeit, if thou shalt hold aloof from battle, or shalt beguile with thy words an other, and turn him from war 12.250. /forthwith smitten by my spear shalt thou lose thy life. So spake he and led the way; and they followed after with a wondrous din; and thereat Zeus, that hurleth the thunderbolt, roused from the mountains of Ida a blast of wind, that bare the dust straight against the ships and he bewildered the mind of the Achaeans, but vouchsafed glory to the Trojans and to Hector. Trusting therefore in his portents and in their might they sought to break the great wall of the Achaeans. The pinnets of the fortifications they dragged down and overthrew the battlements, and pried out the supporting beams that the Achaeans had set 22.159. /where the wives and fair daughters of the Trojans were wont to wash bright raiment of old in the time of peace, before the sons of the Achaeans came. Thereby they ran, one fleeing, and one pursuing. In front a good man fled, but one mightier far pursued him swiftly; for it was not for beast of sacrifice or for bull's hide 22.160. /that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead; 22.161. /that they strove, such as are men's prizes for swiftness of foot, but it was for the life of horse-taming Hector that they ran. And as when single-hooved horses that are winners of prizes course swiftly about the turning-points, and some — great prize is set forth, a tripod haply or a woman, in honour of a warrior that is dead;
2. Homer, Odyssey, 2.146-2.176, 2.181, 2.187-2.199, 3.180-3.182 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.462-1.474, 1.492-1.495, 1.861-1.876, 1.1284-1.1344, 2.1-2.29, 3.169-3.178, 3.194-3.195, 3.302-3.448, 3.453-3.458, 3.475-3.483, 3.502-3.516, 3.540-3.554, 3.557-3.566, 3.577, 3.580-3.588, 3.594-3.600, 3.1170, 3.1252-3.1253, 4.212-4.235, 4.350-4.393 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.462. τὸν δʼ ἄρʼ ὑποφρασθεὶς μεγάλῃ ὀπὶ νείκεσεν Ἴδας· 1.463. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε μετὰ φρεσὶ μῆτιν ἑλίσσεις; 1.464. αὔδα ἐνὶ μέσσοισι τεὸν νόον. ἦέ σε δαμνᾷ 1.465. τάρβος ἐπιπλόμενον, τό τʼ ἀνάλκιδας ἄνδρας ἀτύζει; 1.466. ἴστω νῦν δόρυ θοῦρον, ὅτῳ περιώσιον ἄλλων 1.467. κῦδος ἐνὶ πτολέμοισιν ἀείρομαι, οὐδέ μʼ ὀφέλλει 1.468. Ζεὺς τόσον, ὁσσάτιόν περ ἐμὸν δόρυ, μή νύ τι πῆμα 1.469. λοίγιον ἔσσεσθαι, μηδʼ ἀκράαντον ἄεθλον 1.470. Ἴδεω ἑσπομένοιο, καὶ εἰ θεὸς ἀντιόῳτο. 1.471. τοῖόν μʼ Ἀρήνηθεν ἀοσσητῆρα κομίζεις.’ 1.472. ἦ, καὶ ἐπισχόμενος πλεῖον δέπας ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.473. πῖνε χαλίκρητον λαρὸν μέθυ· δεύετο δʼ οἴνῳ 1.474. χείλεα, κυάνεαί τε γενειάδες· οἱ δʼ ὁμάδησαν 1.492. Χώετʼ ἐνιπτάζων· προτέρω δέ κε νεῖκος ἐτύχθη 1.493. εἰ μὴ δηριόωντας ὁμοκλήσαντες ἑταῖροι 1.494. αὐτός τʼ Αἰσονίδης κατερήτυεν· ἂν δὲ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς 1.495. λαιῇ ἀνασχόμενος κίθαριν πείραζεν ἀοιδῆς. 1.861. ἀμβολίη δʼ εἰς ἦμαρ ἀεὶ ἐξ ἤματος ἦεν 1.862. ναυτιλίης· δηρὸν δʼ ἂν ἐλίνυον αὖθι μένοντες 1.863. εἰ μὴ ἀολλίσσας ἑτάρους ἀπάνευθε γυναικῶν 1.864. Ἡρακλέης τοίοισιν ἐνιπτάζων μετέειπεν· 1.865. ‘δαιμόνιοι, πάτρης ἐμφύλιον αἷμʼ ἀποέργει 1.866. ἡμέας; ἦε γάμων ἐπιδευέες ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν 1.867. κεῖθεν, ὀνοσσάμενοι πολιήτιδας; αὖθι δʼ ἕαδεν 1.868. ναίοντας λιπαρὴν ἄροσιν Λήμνοιο ταμέσθαι; 1.869. οὐ μὰν εὐκλειεῖς γε σὺν ὀθνείῃσι γυναιξὶν 1.870. ἐσσόμεθʼ ὧδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἐελμένοι· οὐδέ τι κῶας 1.871. αὐτόματον δώσει τις ἑλὼν θεὸς εὐξαμένοισιν. 1.872. ἴομεν αὖτις ἕκαστοι ἐπὶ σφέα· τὸν δʼ ἐνὶ λέκτροις 1.873. Ὑψιπύλης εἰᾶτε πανήμερον, εἰσόκε Λῆμνον 1.874. παισὶν ἐσανδρώσῃ, μεγάλη τέ ἑ βάξις ἵκηται.’ 1.875. ὧς νείκεσσεν ὅμιλον· ἐναντία δʼ οὔ νύ τις ἔτλη 1.876. ὄμματʼ ἀνασχεθέειν, οὐδὲ προτιμυθήσασθαι· 1.1284. ἐν δέ σφιν κρατερὸν νεῖκος πέσεν, ἐν δὲ κολῳὸς 1.1285. ἄσπετος, εἰ τὸν ἄριστον ἀποπρολιπόντες ἔβησαν 1.1286. σφωιτέρων ἑτάρων. ὁ δʼ ἀμηχανίῃσιν ἀτυχθεὶς 1.1287. οὔτε τι τοῖον ἔπος μετεφώνεεν, οὔτε τι τοῖον 1.1288. Αἰσονίδης· ἀλλʼ ἧστο βαρείῃ νειόθεν ἄτῃ 1.1289. θυμὸν ἔδων· Τελαμῶνα δʼ ἕλεν χόλος, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 1.1290. ‘ἧσʼ αὔτως εὔκηλος, ἐπεί??ύ τοι ἄρμενον ἦεν 1.1291. Ἡρακλῆα λιπεῖν· σέο δʼ ἔκτοθι μῆτις ὄρωρεν 1.1292. ὄφρα τὸ κείνου κῦδος ἀνʼ Ἑλλάδα μή σε καλύψῃ 1.1293. αἴ κε θεοὶ δώωσιν ὑπότροπον οἴκαδε νόστον. 1.1294. ἀλλὰ τί μύθων ἦδος; ἐπεὶ καὶ νόσφιν ἑταίρων 1.1295. εἶμι τεῶν, οἳ τόνγε δόλον συνετεκτήναντο.’ 1.1296. ἦ, καὶ ἐς Ἁγνιάδην Τῖφυν θόρε· τὼ δέ οἱ ὄσσε 1.1297. ὄστλιγγες μαλεροῖο πυρὸς ὣς ἰνδάλλοντο. 1.1298. καί νύ κεν ἂψ ὀπίσω Μυσῶν ἐπὶ γαῖαν ἵκοντο 1.1299. λαῖτμα βιησάμενοι ἀνέμου τʼ ἄλληκτον ἰωήν 1.1300. εἰ μὴ Θρηικίοιο δύω υἷες Βορέαο 1.1301. Αἰακίδην χαλεποῖσιν ἐρητύεσκον ἔπεσσιν 1.1302. σχέτλιοι· ἦ τέ σφιν στυγερὴ τίσις ἔπλετʼ ὀπίσσω 1.1303. χερσὶν ὑφʼ Ἡρακλῆος, ὅ μιν δίζεσθαι ἔρυκον. 1.1304. ἄθλων γὰρ Πελίαο δεδουπότος ἂψ ἀνιόντας 1.1305. τήνῳ ἐν ἀμφιρύτῃ πέφνεν, καὶ ἀμήσατο γαῖαν 1.1306. ἀμφʼ αὐτοῖς, στήλας τε δύω καθύπερθεν ἔτευξεν 1.1307. ὧν ἑτέρη, θάμβος περιώσιον ἀνδράσι λεύσσειν 1.1308. κίνυται ἠχήεντος ὑπὸ πνοιῇ βορέαο. 1.1309. καὶ τὰ μὲν ὧς ἤμελλε μετὰ χρόνον ἐκτελέεσθαι. 1.1310. τοῖσιν δὲ Γλαῦκος βρυχίης ἁλὸς ἐξεφαάνθη 1.1311. Νηρῆος θείοιο πολυφράδμων ὑποφήτης· 1.1312. ὕψι δὲ λαχνῆέν τε κάρη καὶ στήθεʼ ἀείρας 1.1313. νειόθεν ἐκ λαγόνων στιβαρῇ ἐπορέξατο χειρὶ 1.1314. νηίου ὁλκαίοιο, καὶ ἴαχεν ἐσσυμένοισιν· 1.1315. ‘τίπτε παρὲκ μεγάλοιο Διὸς μενεαίνετε βουλὴν 1.1316. Αἰήτεω πτολίεθρον ἄγειν θρασὺν Ἡρακλῆα; 1.1317. Ἄργεΐ οἱ μοῖρʼ ἐστὶν ἀτασθάλῳ Εὐρυσθῆι 1.1318. ἐκπλῆσαι μογέοντα δυώδεκα πάντας ἀέθλους 1.1319. ναίειν δʼ ἀθανάτοισι συνέστιον, εἴ κʼ ἔτι παύρους 1.1320. ἐξανύσῃ· τῶ μή τι ποθὴ κείνοιο πελέσθω. 1.1321. αὔτως δʼ αὖ Πολύφημον ἐπὶ προχοῇσι Κίοιο 1.1322. πέπρωται Μυσοῖσι περικλεὲς ἄστυ καμόντα 1.1323. μοῖραν ἀναπλήσειν Χαλύβων ἐν ἀπείρονι γαίῃ. 1.1324. αὐτὰρ Ὕλαν φιλότητι θεὰ ποιήσατο νύμφη 1.1325. ὃν πόσιν, οἷό περ οὕνεκʼ ἀποπλαγχθέντες ἔλειφθεν.’ 1.1326. ἦ, καὶ κῦμʼ ἀλίαστον ἐφέσσατο νειόθι δύψας· 1.1327. ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ δίνῃσι κυκώμενον ἄφρεεν ὕδωρ 1.1328. πορφύρεον, κοίλην δὲ διὲξ ἁλὸς ἔκλυσε νῆα. 1.1329. γήθησαν δʼ ἥρωες· ὁ δʼ ἐσσυμένως ἐβεβήκει 1.1330. Αἰακίδης Τελαμὼν ἐς Ἰήσονα, χεῖρα δὲ χειρὶ 1.1331. ἄκρην ἀμφιβαλὼν προσπτύξατο, φώνησέν τε· 1.1332. ‘Αἰσονίδη, μή μοί τι χολώσεαι, ἀφραδίῃσιν 1.1333. εἴ τί περ ἀασάμην· πέρι γάρ μʼ ἄχος εἷλεν ἐνισπεῖν 1.1334. μῦθον ὑπερφίαλόν τε καὶ ἄσχετον, ἀλλʼ ἀνέμοισιν 1.1335. δώομεν ἀμπλακίην, ὡς καὶ πάρος εὐμενέοντες.’ 1.1336. τὸν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἐπιφραδέως προσέειπεν· 1.1337. ‘ὦ πέπον, ἦ μάλα δή με κακῷ ἐκυδάσσαο μύθῳ 1.1338. φὰς ἐνὶ τοῖσιν ἅπασιν ἐνηέος ἀνδρὸς ἀλείτην 1.1339. ἔμμεναι. ἀλλʼ οὐ θήν τοι ἀδευκέα μῆνιν ἀέξω 1.1340. πρίν περ ἀνιηθείς· ἐπεὶ οὐ περὶ πώεσι μήλων 1.1341. οὐδὲ περὶ κτεάτεσσι χαλεψάμενος μενέηνας 1.1342. ἀλλʼ ἑτάρου περὶ φωτός. ἔολπα δέ τοι σὲ καὶ ἄλλῳ 1.1343. ἀμφʼ ἐμεῦ, εἰ τοιόνδε πέλοι ποτέ, δηρίσασθαι.’ 1.1344. ἦ ῥα, καὶ ἀρθμηθέντες, ὅπῃ πάρος, ἑδριόωντο. 2.1. ἔνθα δʼ ἔσαν σταθμοί τε βοῶν αὖλίς τʼ Ἀμύκοιο 2.2. Βεβρύκων βασιλῆος ἀγήνορος, ὅν ποτε νύμφη 2.3. τίκτε Ποσειδάωνι Γενεθλίῳ εὐνηθεῖσα 2.4. Βιθυνὶς Μελίη, ὑπεροπληέστατον ἀνδρῶν· 2.5. ὅς τʼ ἐπὶ καὶ ξείνοισιν ἀεικέα θεσμὸν ἔθηκεν 2.6. μήτινʼ ἀποστείχειν, πρὶν πειρήσασθαι ἑοῖο 2.7. πυγμαχίης· πολέας δὲ περικτιόνων ἐδάιξεν. 2.8. καὶ δὲ τότε προτὶ νῆα κιών, χρειώ μιν ἐρέσθαι 2.9. ναυτιλίης, οἵ τʼ εἶεν, ὑπερβασίῃσιν ἄτισσεν 2.10. τοῖον δʼ ἐν πάντεσσι παρασχεδὸν ἔκφατο μῦθον· 2.11. ‘Κέκλυθʼ, ἁλίπλαγκτοι, τάπερ ἴδμεναι ὔμμιν ἔοικεν. 2.12. οὔτινα θέσμιόν ἐστιν ἀφορμηθέντα νέεσθαι 2.13. ἀνδρῶν ὀθνείων, ὅς κεν Βέβρυξι πελάσσῃ 2.14. πρὶν χείρεσσιν ἐμῇσιν ἑὰς ἀνὰ χεῖρας ἀεῖραι. 2.15. τῶ καί μοι τὸν ἄριστον ἀποκριδὸν οἶον ὁμίλου 2.16. πυγμαχίῃ στήσασθε καταυτόθι δηρινθῆναι. 2.17. εἰ δʼ ἂν ἀπηλεγέοντες ἐμὰς πατέοιτε θέμιστας 2.18. ἧ κέν τις στυγερῶς κρατερὴ ἐπιέψετʼ ἀνάγκη.’ 2.19. ἦ ῥα μέγα φρονέων· τοὺς δʼ ἄγριος εἰσαΐοντας 2.20. εἷλε χόλος· περὶ δʼ αὖ Πολυδεύκεα τύψεν ὁμοκλη 2.21. αἶψα δʼ ἑῶν ἑτάρων πρόμος ἵστατο, φώνησέν τε· 2.22. ‘ἴσχεο νῦν, μηδʼ ἄμμι κακήν, ὅτις εὔχεαι εἶναι 2.23. φαῖνε βίην· θεσμοῖς γὰρ ὑπείξομεν, ὡς ἀγορεύεις. 2.24. αὐτὸς ἑκὼν ἤδη τοι ὑπίσχομαι ἀντιάασθαι.’ 2.25. ὧς φάτʼ ἀπηλεγέως· ὁ δʼ ἐσέδρακεν ὄμμαθʼ ἑλίξας 2.26. ὥστε λέων ὑπʼ ἄκοντι τετυμμένος, ὅν τʼ ἐν ὄρεσσιν 2.27. ἀνέρες ἀμφιπένονται· ὁ δʼ ἰλλόμενός περ ὁμίλῳ 2.28. τῶν μὲν ἔτʼ οὐκ ἀλέγει, ἐπὶ δʼ ὄσσεται οἰόθεν οἶον 2.29. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς μιν ἔτυψε παροίτατος, οὐδʼ ἐδάμασσεν. 3.302. ἐκ δὲ τοῦ Αἰήτης σφετέρης ἐρέεινε θυγατρὸς 3.303. υἱῆας τοίοισι παρηγορέων ἐπέεσσιν· 3.304. ‘παιδὸς ἐμῆς κοῦροι Φρίξοιό τε, τὸν περὶ πάντων 3.305. ξείνων ἡμετέροισιν ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἔτισα 3.306. πῶς Αἶάνδε νέεσθε παλίσσυτοι; ἦέ τις ἄτη 3.307. σωομένοις μεσσηγὺς ἐνέκλασεν; οὐ μὲν ἐμεῖο 3.308. πείθεσθε προφέροντος ἀπείρονα μέτρα κελεύθου. 3.309. ᾔδειν γάρ ποτε πατρὸς ἐν ἅρμασιν Ἠελίοιο 3.310. δινεύσας, ὅτʼ ἐμεῖο κασιγνήτην ἐκόμιζεν 3.311. Κίρκην ἑσπερίης εἴσω χθονός, ἐκ δʼ ἱκόμεσθα 3.312. ἀκτὴν ἠπείρου Τυρσηνίδος, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 3.313. ναιετάει, μάλα πολλὸν ἀπόπροθι Κολχίδος αἴης. 3.314. ἀλλὰ τί μύθων ἦδος; ἃ δʼ ἐν ποσὶν ὗμιν ὄρωρεν 3.315. εἴπατʼ ἀριφραδέως, ἠδʼ οἵτινες οἵδʼ ἐφέπονται 3.316. ἀνέρες, ὅππῃ τε γλαφυρῆς ἐκ νηὸς ἔβητε.’ 3.317. τοῖά μιν ἐξερέοντα κασιγνήτων προπάροιθεν 3.318. Ἄργος ὑποδδείσας ἀμφὶ στόλῳ Αἰσονίδαο 3.319. μειλιχίως προσέειπεν, ἐπεὶ προγενέστερος ἦεν· 3.320. ‘Αἰήτη, κείνην μὲν ἄφαρ διέχευαν ἄελλαι 3.321. ζαχρηεῖς· αὐτοὺς δʼ ἐπὶ δούρασι πεπτηῶτας 3.322. νήσου Ἐνυαλίοιο ποτὶ ξερὸν ἔκβαλε κῦμα 3.323. λυγαίῃ ὑπὸ νυκτί· θεὸς δέ τις ἄμμʼ ἐσάωσεν. 3.324. οὐδὲ γὰρ αἳ τὸ πάροιθεν ἐρημαίην κατὰ νῆσον 3.325. ηὐλίζοντʼ ὄρνιθες Ἀρήιαι, οὐδʼ ἔτι κείνας 3.326. εὕρομεν. ἀλλʼ οἵγʼ ἄνδρες ἀπήλασαν, ἐξαποβάντες 3.327. νηὸς ἑῆς προτέρῳ ἐνὶ ἤματι· καί σφʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.328. ἡμέας οἰκτείρων Ζηνὸς νόος, ἠέ τις αἶσα 3.329. αὐτίκʼ ἐπεὶ καὶ βρῶσιν ἅλις καὶ εἵματʼ ἔδωκαν 3.330. οὔνομά τε Φρίξοιο περικλεὲς εἰσαΐοντες 3.331. ἠδʼ αὐτοῖο σέθεν· μετὰ γὰρ τεὸν ἄστυ νέονται. 3.332. χρειὼ δʼ ἢν ἐθέλῃς ἐξίδμεναι, οὔ σʼ ἐπικεύσω. 3.333. τόνδε τις ἱέμενος πάτρης ἀπάνευθεν ἐλάσσαι 3.334. καὶ κτεάνων βασιλεὺς περιώσιον, οὕνεκεν ἀλκῇ 3.335. σφωιτέρῃ τάντεσσι μετέπρεπεν Αἰολίδῃσιν 3.336. πέμπει δεῦρο νέεσθαι ἀμήχανον· οὐδʼ ὑπαλύξειν 3.337. στεῦται ἀμειλίκτοιο Διὸς θυμαλγέα μῆνιν 3.338. καὶ χόλον, οὐδʼ ἄτλητον ἄγος Φρίξοιό τε ποινὰς 3.339. Αἰολιδέων γενεήν, πρὶν ἐς Ἑλλάδα κῶας ἱκέσθαι. 3.340. νῆα δʼ Ἀθηναίη Παλλὰς κάμεν, οὐ μάλα τοίην 3.341. οἷαί περ Κόλχοισι μετʼ ἀνδράσι νῆες ἔασιν 3.342. τάων αἰνοτάτης ἐπεκύρσαμεν. ἤλιθα γάρ μιν 3.343. λάβρον ὕδωρ πνοιή τε διέτμαγεν· ἡ δʼ ἐνὶ γόμφοις 3.344. ἴσχεται, ἢν καὶ πᾶσαι ἐπιβρίσωσιν ἄελλαι. 3.345. ἶσον δʼ ἐξ ἀνέμοιο θέει καὶ ὅτʼ ἀνέρες αὐτοὶ 3.346. νωλεμέως χείρεσσιν ἐπισπέρχωσιν ἐρετμοῖς. 3.347. τῇ δʼ ἐναγειράμενος Παναχαιίδος εἴ τι φέριστον 3.348. ἡρώων, τεὸν ἄστυ μετήλυθε, πόλλʼ ἐπαληθεὶς 3.349. ἄστεα καὶ πελάγη στυγερῆς ἁλός, εἴ οἱ ὀπάσσαις. 3.350. αὐτῷ δʼ ὥς κεν ἅδῃ, τὼς ἔσσεται· οὐ γὰρ ἱκάνει 3.351. χερσὶ βιησόμενος· μέμονεν δέ τοι ἄξια τίσειν 3.352. δωτίνης, ἀίων ἐμέθεν μέγα δυσμενέοντας 3.353. Σαυρομάτας, τοὺς σοῖσιν ὑπὸ σκήπτροισι δαμάσσει. 3.354. εἰ δὲ καὶ οὔνομα δῆθεν ἐπιθύεις γενεήν τε 3.355. ἴδμεναι, οἵτινές εἰσιν, ἕκαστά γε μυθησαίμην. 3.356. τόνδε μέν, οἷό περ οὕνεκʼ ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος ὧλλοι ἄγερθεν 3.357. κλείουσʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸν Ἰήσονα Κρηθεΐδαο. 3.358. εἰ δʼ αὐτοῦ Κρηθῆος ἐτήτυμόν ἐστι γενέθλης 3.359. οὕτω κεν γνωτὸς πατρώιος ἄμμι πέλοιτο. 3.360. ἄμφω γὰρ Κρηθεὺς Ἀθάμας τʼ ἔσαν Αἰόλου υἷες· 3.361. Φρίξος δʼ αὖτʼ Ἀθάμαντος ἔην πάις Αἰολίδαο. 3.362. τόνδε δʼ ἄρʼ, Ἠελίου γόνον ἔμμεναι εἴ τινʼ ἀκούεις 3.363. δέρκεαι Αὐγείην· Τελαμὼν δʼ ὅγε, κυδίστοιο 3.364. Αἰακοῦ ἐκγεγαώς· Ζεὺς δʼ Αἰακὸν αὐτὸς ἔτικτεν. 3.365. ὧς δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι πάντες, ὅσοι συνέπονται ἑταῖροι 3.366. ἀθανάτων υἷές τε καὶ υἱωνοὶ γεγάασιν.’ 3.367. τοῖα παρέννεπεν Ἄργος· ἄναξ δʼ ἐπεχώσατο μύθοις 3.368. εἰσαΐων· ὑψοῦ δὲ χόλῳ φρένες ἠερέθοντο. 3.369. φῆ δʼ ἐπαλαστήσας· μενέαινε δὲ παισὶ μάλιστα 3.370. Χαλκιόπης· τῶν γάρ σφε μετελθέμεν οὕνεκʼ ἐώλπει· 3.371. ἐκ δέ οἱ ὄμματʼ ἔλαμψεν ὑπʼ ὀφρύσιν ἱεμένοιο· 3.372. ‘οὐκ ἄφαρ ὀφθαλμῶν μοι ἀπόπροθι, λωβητῆρες 3.373. νεῖσθʼ αὐτοῖσι δόλοισι παλίσσυτοι ἔκτοθι γαίης 3.374. πρίν τινα λευγαλέον τε δέρος καὶ Φρίξον ἰδέσθαι; 3.375. αὐτίχʼ ὁμαρτήσαντες ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος, οὐκ ἐπὶ κῶας 3.376. σκῆπτρα δὲ καὶ τιμὴν βασιληίδα δεῦρο νέεσθε. 3.377. εἰ δέ κε μὴ προπάροιθεν ἐμῆς ἥψασθε τραπέζης 3.378. ἦ τʼ ἂν ἀπὸ γλώσσας τε ταμὼν καὶ χεῖρε κεάσσας 3.379. ἀμφοτέρας, οἴοισιν ἐπιπροέηκα πόδεσσιν 3.380. ὥς κεν ἐρητύοισθε καὶ ὕστερον ὁρμηθῆναι 3.381. οἷα δὲ καὶ μακάρεσσιν ἐπεψεύσασθε θεοῖσιν.’ 3.382. φῆ ῥα χαλεψάμενος· μέγα δὲ φρένες Αἰακίδαο 3.383. νειόθεν οἰδαίνεσκον· ἐέλδετο δʼ ἔνδοθι θυμὸς 3.384. ἀντιβίην ὀλοὸν φάσθαι ἔπος· ἀλλʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.385. Αἰσονίδης· πρὸ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἀμείψατο μειλιχίοισιν· 3.386. ‘Αἰήτη, σχέο μοι τῷδε στόλῳ. οὔτι γὰρ αὔτως 3.387. ἄστυ τεὸν καὶ δώμαθʼ ἱκάνομεν, ὥς που ἔολπας 3.388. οὐδὲ μὲν ἱέμενοι. τίς δʼ ἂν τόσον οἶδμα περῆσαι 3.389. τλαίη ἑκὼν ὀθνεῖον ἐπὶ κτέρας; ἀλλά με δαίμων 3.390. καὶ κρυερὴ βασιλῆος ἀτασθάλου ὦρσεν ἐφετμή. 3.391. δὸς χάριν ἀντομένοισι· σέθεν δʼ ἐγὼ Ἑλλάδι πάσῃ 3.392. θεσπεσιην οἴσω κληηδόνα· καὶ δέ τοι ἤδη 3.393. πρόφρονές εἰμεν ἄρηι θοὴν ἀποτῖσαι ἀμοιβήν 3.394. εἴτʼ οὖν Σαυρομάτας γε λιλαίεαι, εἴτε τινʼ ἄλλον 3.395. δῆμον σφωιτέροισιν ὑπὸ σκήπτροισι δαμάσσαι.’ 3.396. Ἴσκεν ὑποσσαίνων ἀγανῇ ὀπί· τοῖο δὲ θυμὸς 3.397. διχθαδίην πόρφυρεν ἐνὶ στήθεσσι μενοινήν 3.398. ἤ σφεας ὁρμηθεὶς αὐτοσχεδὸν ἐξεναρίζοι 3.399. ἦ ὅγε πειρήσαιτο βίης. τό οἱ εἴσατʼ ἄρειον 3.400. φραζομένῳ· καὶ δή μιν ὑποβλήδην προσέειπεν· 3.401. ‘ξεῖνε, τί κεν τὰ ἕκαστα διηνεκέως ἀγορεύοις; 3.402. εἰ γὰρ ἐτήτυμόν ἐστε θεῶν γένος, ἠὲ καὶ ἄλλως 3.403. οὐδὲν ἐμεῖο χέρηες ἐπʼ ὀθνείοισιν ἔβητε 3.404. δώσω τοι χρύσειον ἄγειν δέρος, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλῃσθα 3.405. πειρηθείς. ἐσθλοῖς γὰρ ἐπʼ ἀνδράσιν οὔτι μεγαίρω 3.406. ὡς αὐτοὶ μυθεῖσθε τὸν Ἑλλάδι κοιρανέοντα. 3.407. πεῖρα δέ τοι μένεός τε καὶ ἀλκῆς ἔσσετʼ ἄεθλος 3.408. τόν ῥʼ αὐτὸς περίειμι χεροῖν ὀλοόν περ ἐόντα. 3.409. δοιώ μοι πεδίον τὸ Ἀρήιον ἀμφινέμονται 3.410. ταύρω χαλκόποδε, στόματι φλόγα φυσιόωντες· 3.411. τοὺς ἐλάω ζεύξας στυφελὴν κατὰ νειὸν Ἄρηος 3.412. τετράγυον, τὴν αἶψα ταμὼν ἐπὶ τέλσον ἀρότρῳ 3.413. οὐ σπόρον ὁλκοῖσιν Δηοῦς ἐνιβᾴλλομαι ἀκτήν 3.414. ἀλλʼ ὄφιος δεινοῖο μεταλδήσκοντας ὀδόντας 3.415. ἀνδράσι τευχηστῇσι δέμας. τοὺς δʼ αὖθι δαΐζων 3.416. κείρω ἐμῷ ὑπὸ δουρὶ περισταδὸν ἀντιόωντας. 3.417. ἠέριος ζεύγνυμι βόας, καὶ δείελον ὥρην 3.418. παύομαι ἀμήτοιο. σύ δʼ, εἰ τάδε τοῖα τελέσσεις 3.419. αὐτῆμαρ τόδε κῶας ἀποίσεαι εἰς βασιλῆος· 3.420. πρὶν δέ κεν οὐ δοίην, μηδʼ ἔλπεο. δὴ γὰρ ἀεικὲς 3.421. ἄνδρʼ ἀγαθὸν γεγαῶτα κακωτέρῳ ἀνέρι εἶξαι.’ 3.422. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· ὁ δὲ σῖγα ποδῶν πάρος ὄμματα πήξας 3.423. ἧστʼ αὔτως ἄφθογγος, ἀμηχανέων κακότητι. 3.424. βουλὴν δʼ ἀμφὶ πολὺν στρώφα χρόνον, οὐδέ πῃ εἶχεν 3.425. θαρσαλέως ὑποδέχθαι, ἐπεὶ μέγα φαίνετο ἔργον· 3.426. ὀψε δʼ ἀμειβόμενος προσελέξατο κερδαλέοισιν· 3.427. ‘Αἰήτη, μάλα τοί με δίκῃ περιπολλὸν ἐέργεις. 3.428. τῶ καὶ ἐγὼ τὸν ἄεθλον ὑπερφίαλόν περ ἐόντα 3.429. τλήσομαι, εἰ καί μοι θανέειν μόρος. οὐ γὰρ ἔτʼ ἄλλο 3.430. ῥίγιον ἀνθρώποισι κακῆς ἐπικείσετʼ ἀνάγκης 3.431. ἥ με καὶ ἐνθάδε νεῖσθαι ἐπέχραεν ἐκ βασιλῆος.’ 3.432. ὧς φάτʼ ἀμηχανίῃ βεβολημένος· αὐτὰρ ὁ τόνγε 3.433. σμερδαλέοις ἐπέεσσι προσέννεπεν ἀσχαλόωντα· 3.434. ‘ἔρχεο νῦν μεθʼ ὅμιλον, ἐπεὶ μέμονάς γε πόνοιο· 3.435. εἰ δὲ σύγε ζυγὰ βουσὶν ὑποδδείσαις ἐπαεῖραι 3.436. ἠὲ καὶ οὐλομένου μεταχάσσεαι ἀμήτοιο 3.437. αὐτῷ κεν τὰ ἕκαστα μέλοιτό μοι, ὄφρα καὶ ἄλλος 3.438. ἀνὴρ ἐρρίγῃσιν ἀρείονα φῶτα μετελθεῖν.’ 3.453. προπρὸ δʼ ἄρʼ ὀφθαλμῶν ἔτι οἱ ἰνδάλλετο πάντα 3.454. αὐτός θʼ οἷος ἔην, οἵοισί τε φάρεσιν ἕστο 3.455. οἷά τʼ ἔειφʼ, ὥς θʼ ἕζετʼ ἐπὶ θρόνου, ὥς τε θύραζε 3.456. ἤιεν· οὐδέ τινʼ ἄλλον ὀίσσατο πορφύρουσα 3.457. ἔμμεναι ἀνέρα τοῖον· ἐν οὔασι δʼ αἰὲν ὀρώρει 3.458. αὐδή τε μῦθοί τε μελίφρονες, οὓς ἀγόρευσεν. 3.502. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πάντεσσι δʼ ἀνήνυτος εἴσατʼ ἄεθλος 3.503. δὴν δʼ ἄνεῳ καὶ ἄναυδοι ἐς ἀλλήλους ὁρόωντο 3.504. ἄτῃ ἀμηχανίῃ τε κατηφέες· ὀψὲ δὲ Πηλεὺς 3.505. θαρσαλέως μετὰ πᾶσιν ἀριστήεσσιν ἔειπεν· 3.506. ‘ὥρη μητιάασθαι ὅ κʼ ἔρξομεν. οὐ μὲν ἔολπα 3.507. βουλῆς εἶναι ὄνειαρ, ὅσον τʼ ἐπὶ κάρτεϊ χειρῶν. 3.508. εἰ μέν νυν τύνη ζεῦξαι βόας Αἰήταο 3.509. ἥρως Αἰσονίδη, φρονέεις, μέμονάς τε πόνοιο 3.510. ἦ τʼ ἂν ὑποσχεσίην πεφυλαγμένος ἐντύναιο· 3.511. εἰ δʼ οὔ τοι μάλα θυμὸς ἑῇ ἐπὶ πάγχυ πέποιθεν 3.512. ἠνορέῃ, μήτʼ αὐτὸς ἐπείγεο, μήτε τινʼ ἄλλον 3.513. τῶνδʼ ἀνδρῶν πάπταινε παρήμενος. οὐ γὰρ ἔγωγε 3.514. σχήσομʼ, ἐπεὶ θάνατός γε τὸ κύντατον ἔσσεται ἄλγος.’ 3.540. ὧς φάτο· τοῖσι δὲ σῆμα θεοὶ δόσαν εὐμενέοντες. 3.541. τρηρὼν μὲν φεύγουσα βίην κίρκοιο πελειὰς 3.542. ὑψόθεν Αἰσονίδεω πεφοβημένη ἔμπεσε κόλποις· 3.543. κίρκος δʼ ἀφλάστῳ περικάππεσεν. ὦκα δὲ Μόψος 3.544. τοῖον ἔπος μετὰ πᾶσι θεοπροπέων ἀγόρευσεν· 3.580. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς ῥʼ ὑπέδεκτο βαρὺν καμέεσθαι ἄεθλον 3.581. δρυμὸν ἀναρρήξας λασίης καθύπερθε· κολώνης 3.582. αὔτανδρον φλέξειν δόρυ νήιον, ὄφρʼ ἀλεγεινὴν 3.583. ὕβριν ἀποφλύξωσιν ὑπέρβια μηχανόωντες. 3.584. οὐδὲ γὰρ Αἰολίδην Φρίξον μάλα περ χατέοντα 3.585. δέχθαι ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἐφέστιον, ὃς περὶ πάντων 3.586. ξείνων μελιχίῃ τε θεουδείῃ τʼ ἐκέκαστο 3.587. εἰ μή οἱ Ζεὺς αὐτὸς ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ ἄγγελον ἧκεν 3.588. Ἑρμείαν, ὥς κεν προσκηδέος ἀντιάσειεν· 3.594. νόσφι δὲ οἷ αὐτῷ φάτʼ ἐοικότα μείλια τίσειν 3.595. υἱῆας Φρίξοιο, κακορρέκτῃσιν ὀπηδοὺς 3.596. ἀνδράσι νοστήσαντας ὁμιλαδόν, ὄφρα ἑ τιμῆς 3.597. καὶ σκήπτρων ἐλάσειαν ἀκηδέες· ὥς ποτε βάξιν 3.598. λευγαλέην οὗ πατρὸς ἐπέκλυεν Ἠελίοιο 3.599. χρειώ μιν πυκινόν τε δόλον βουλάς τε γενέθλης 3.600. σφωιτέρης ἄτην τε πολύτροπον ἐξαλέασθαι· 3.1170. Ἴδας ἧστʼ ἀπάνευθε δακὼν χόλον· οἱ δὲ δὴ ἄλλοι 3.1252. αὐτὰρ ὁ τοῖς ἄμοτον κοτέων Ἀφαρήιος Ἴδας 3.1253. κόψε παρʼ οὐρίαχον μεγάλῳ ξίφει· ἆλτο δʼ ἀκωκὴ 4.212. ἤδη δʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι πᾶσί τε Κόλχοις 4.213. Μηδείης περίπυστος ἔρως καὶ ἔργʼ ἐτέτυκτο. 4.214. ἐς δʼ ἀγορὴν ἀγέροντʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσιν· ὅσσα δέ πόντου 4.215. κύματα χειμερίοιο κορύσσεται ἐξ ἀνέμοιο 4.216. ἢ ὅσα φύλλα χαμᾶζε περικλαδέος πέσεν ὕλης 4.217. φυλλοχόῳ ἐνὶ μηνί--τίς ἂν τάδε τεκμήραιτο; 4.218. ὧς οἱ ἀπειρέσιοι ποταμοῦ παρεμέτρεον ὄχθας 4.219. κλαγγῇ μαιμώοντες· ὁ δʼ εὐτύκτῳ ἐνὶ δίφρῳ 4.220. Αἰήτης ἵπποισι μετέπρεπεν, οὕς οἱ ὄπασσεν 4.221. ἠέλιος πνοιῇσιν ἐειδομένους ἀνέμοιο 4.222. σκαιῇ μέν ῥ̓ ἐνὶ χειρὶ σάκος δινωτὸν ἀείρων 4.223. τῇ δʼ ἑτέρῃ πεύκην περιμήκεα· πὰρ δέ οἱ ἔγχος 4.224. ἀντικρὺ τετάνυστο πελώριον. ἡνία δʼ ἵππων 4.225. γέντο χεροῖν Ἄψυρτος. υπεκπρὸ δὲ πόντον ἔταμνεν 4.226. νηῦς ἤδη κρατεροῖσιν ἐπειγομένη ἐρέτῃσιν 4.227. καὶ μεγάλου ποταμοῖο καταβλώσκοντι ῥεέθρῳ. 4.228. αὐτὰρ ἄναξ ἄτῃ πολυπήμονι χεῖρας ἀείρας 4.229. ἠέλιον καὶ Ζῆνα κακῶν ἐπιμάρτυρας ἔργων 4.230. κέκλετο· δεινὰ δὲ παντὶ παρασχεδὸν ἤπυε λαῷ 4.231. εἰ μή οἱ κούρην αὐτάγρετον, ἢ ἀνὰ γαῖαν 4.232. ἢ πλωτῆς εὑρόντες ἔτʼ εἰν ἁλὸς οἴδματι νῆα 4.233. ἄξουσιν, καὶ θυμὸν ἐνιπλήσει μενεαίνων 4.234. τίσασθαι τάδε πάντα, δαήσονται κεφαλῇσιν 4.235. πάντα χόλον καὶ πᾶσαν ἑὴν ὑποδέγμενοι ἄτην. 4.350. ἔνθα δʼ ἐπεὶ τὰ ἕκαστα νόῳ πεμπάσσατο κούρη 4.351. δή ῥά μιν ὀξεῖαι κραδίην ἐλέλιξαν ἀνῖαι 4.352. νωλεμές· αἶψα δὲ νόσφιν Ἰήσονα μοῦνον ἑταίρων 4.353. ἐκπροκαλεσσαμένη ἄγεν ἄλλυδις, ὄφρʼ ἐλίασθεν 4.354. πολλὸν ἑκάς, στονόεντα δʼ ἐνωπαδὶς ἔκφατο μῦθον· 4.355. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε συναρτύνασθε μενοινὴν 4.356. ἀμφʼ ἐμοί; ἦέ σε πάγχυ λαθιφροσύναις ἐνέηκαν 4.357. ἀγλαΐαι, τῶν δʼ οὔτι μετατρέπῃ, ὅσσʼ ἀγόρευες 4.358. χρειοῖ ἐνισχόμενος; ποῦ τοι Διὸς Ἱκεσίοιο 4.359. ὅρκια, ποῦ δὲ μελιχραὶ ὑποσχεσίαι βεβάασιν; 4.360. ᾗς ἐγὼ οὐ κατὰ κόσμον ἀναιδήτῳ ἰότητι 4.361. πάτρην τε κλέα τε μεγάρων αὐτούς τε τοκῆας 4.362. νοσφισάμην, τά μοι ἦεν ὑπέρτατα· τηλόθι δʼ οἴη 4.363. λυγρῇσιν κατὰ πόντον ἅμʼ ἀλκυόνεσσι φορεῦμαι 4.364. σῶν ἕνεκεν καμάτων, ἵνα μοι σόος ἀμφί τε βουσὶν 4.365. ἀμφί τε γηγενέεσσιν ἀναπλήσειας ἀέθλους. 4.366. ὕστατον αὖ καὶ κῶας, ἐπεί τʼ ἐπαϊστὸν ἐτύχθη 4.367. εἷλες ἐμῇ ματίῃ· κατὰ δʼ οὐλοὸν αἶσχος ἔχευα 4.368. θηλυτέραις. τῶ φημὶ τεὴ κούρη τε δάμαρ τε 4.369. αὐτοκασιγνήτη τε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἕπεσθαι. 4.370. πάντῃ νυν πρόφρων ὑπερίστασο, μηδέ με μούνην 4.371. σεῖο λίπῃς ἀπάνευθεν, ἐποιχόμενος βασιλῆας. 4.372. ἀλλʼ αὔτως εἴρυσο· δίκη δέ τοι ἔμπεδος ἔστω 4.373. καὶ θέμις, ἣν ἄμφω συναρέσσαμεν· ἢ σύγʼ ἔπειτα 4.374. φασγάνῳ αὐτίκα τόνδε μέσον διὰ λαιμὸν ἀμῆσαι 4.375. ὄφρʼ ἐπίηρα φέρωμαι ἐοικότα μαργοσύνῃσιν. 4.376. σχετλίη, εἴ κεν δή με κασιγνήτοιο δικάσσῃ 4.377. ἔμμεναι οὗτος ἄναξ, τῷ ἐπίσχετε τάσδʼ ἀλεγεινὰς 4.378. ἄμφω συνθεσίας. πῶς ἵξομαι ὄμματα πατρός; 4.379. ἦ μάλʼ ἐυκλειής; τίνα δʼ οὐ τίσιν, ἠὲ βαρεῖαν 4.380. ἄτην οὐ σμυγερῶς δεινῶν ὕπερ, οἷα ἔοργα 4.381. ὀτλήσω; σὺ δέ κεν θυμηδέα νόστον ἕλοιο; 4.382. μὴ τόγε παμβασίλεια Διὸς τελέσειεν ἄκοιτις 4.383. ᾗ ἐπικυδιάεις. μνήσαιο δέ καί ποτʼ ἐμεῖο 4.384. στρευγόμενος καμάτοισι· δέρος δέ τοι ἶσον ὀνείροις 4.385. οἴχοιτʼ εἰς ἔρεβος μεταμώνιον. ἐκ δέ σε πάτρης 4.386. αὐτίκʼ ἐμαί σʼ ἐλάσειαν Ἐρινύες· οἷα καὶ αὐτὴ 4.387. σῇ πάθον ἀτροπίῃ. τὰ μὲν οὐ θέμις ἀκράαντα 4.388. ἐν γαίῃ πεσέειν. μάλα γὰρ μέγαν ἤλιτες ὅρκον 4.389. νηλεές· ἀλλʼ οὔ θήν μοι ἐπιλλίζοντες ὀπίσσω 4.390. δὴν ἔσσεσθʼ εὔκηλοι ἕκητί γε συνθεσιάων.’ 4.391. ὧς φάτʼ ἀναζείουσα βαρὺν χόλον· ἵετο δʼ ἥγε 4.392. νῆα καταφλέξαι, διά τʼ ἔμπεδα πάντα κεάσσαι 4.393. ἐν δὲ πεσεῖν αὐτὴ μαλερῷ πυρί. τοῖα δʼ Ἰήσων
4. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.562-1.563, 2.647, 3.553, 4.327, 5.1-5.62, 5.65-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.549-5.560, 5.562, 5.572, 5.581-5.606, 5.614, 6.736, 8.385-8.407 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
achilles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 489
aeetes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
agamemnon de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
amycus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91
andromache de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 489
aphrodite de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 488, 489
apollonius rhodius, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
apollonius rhodius, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
apollonius rhodius de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488, 489
argo, abandonment of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91
argus, builder of the argo Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
augeas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91
castor Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91
colchis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
diomedes de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 489
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488, 489
focalization, embedded (or secondary) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
golden fleece Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90
hector de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 488, 489
heracles/hercules, greek heracles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 488, 489
idas de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488, 489
idmon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
intertextuality, allusion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488, 489
intertextuality de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488, 489
jason Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488
medea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90, 92
mopsus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
mysia Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
paris/alexander of troy de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 488
peleus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
phrixus, sons of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90, 91
pollux Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91
silence Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
simile de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
speech, collective Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488, 489
telamon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480, 488
thersites' de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 488
thersites de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 489
tiphys Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
valerius flaccus, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
valerius flaccus, lament in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
valerius flaccus, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92