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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1051
Apollonius Of Rhodes, Argonautica, 3.377-3.381
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6 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.9-1.10, 1.12-1.13, 1.18-1.19, 1.24-1.45, 1.50-1.168, 1.176-1.177, 1.183-1.248, 1.254-1.273, 1.275-1.284, 1.287-1.290, 1.292-1.302 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.9. /from the time when first they parted in strife Atreus' son, king of men, and brilliant Achilles.Who then of the gods was it that brought these two together to contend? The son of Leto and Zeus; for he in anger against the king roused throughout the host an evil pestilence, and the people began to perish 1.10. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.12. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.13. /because upon the priest Chryses the son of Atreus had wrought dishonour. For he had come to the swift ships of the Achaeans to free his daughter, bearing ransom past counting; and in his hands he held the wreaths of Apollo who strikes from afar, on a staff of gold; and he implored all the Achaeans 1.18. /but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.19. /but most of all the two sons of Atreus, the marshallers of the people:Sons of Atreus, and other well-greaved Achaeans, to you may the gods who have homes upon Olympus grant that you sack the city of Priam, and return safe to your homes; but my dear child release to me, and accept the ransom 1.24. /out of reverence for the son of Zeus, Apollo who strikes from afar. Then all the rest of the Achaeans shouted assent, to reverence the priest and accept the glorious ransom, yet the thing did not please the heart of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, but he sent him away harshly, and laid upon him a stern command: 1.25. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.26. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.27. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.28. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.29. / Let me not find you, old man, by the hollow ships, either tarrying now or coming back later, lest your staff and the wreath of the god not protect you. Her I will not set free. Sooner shall old age come upon her in our house, in Argos, far from her native land 1.30. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.31. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.32. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.33. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. 1.34. /as she walks to and fro before the loom and serves my bed. But go, do not anger me, that you may return the safer. So he spoke, and the old man was seized with fear and obeyed his word. He went forth in silence along the shore of the loud-resounding sea, and earnestly then, when he had gone apart, the old man prayed 1.35. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.36. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.37. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.38. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.39. /to the lord Apollo, whom fair-haired Leto bore:Hear me, god of the silver bow, who stand over Chryse and holy Cilla, and rule mightily over Tenedos, Sminthian god, if ever I roofed over a temple to your pleasing, or if ever I burned to you fat thigh-pieces of bulls and goats 1.40. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.41. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.42. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.43. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.44. /fulfill this prayer for me: let the Danaans pay for my tears by your arrows So he spoke in prayer, and Phoebus Apollo heard him. Down from the peaks of Olympus he strode, angered at heart, bearing on his shoulders his bow and covered quiver. 1.45. /The arrows rattled on the shoulders of the angry god as he moved, and his coming was like the night. Then he sat down apart from the ships and let fly an arrow: terrible was the twang of the silver bow. The mules he assailed first and the swift dogs 1.50. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.51. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.52. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.53. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.54. /but then on the men themselves he let fly his stinging shafts, and struck; and constantly the pyres of the dead burned thick.For nine days the missiles of the god ranged among the host, but on the tenth Achilles called the people to assembly, for the goddess, white-armed Hera, had put it in his heart 1.55. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.56. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.57. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.58. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.59. /since she pitied the Danaans, when she saw them dying. When they were assembled and gathered together, among them arose and spoke swift-footed Achilles:Son of Atreus, now I think we shall return home, beaten back again, should we even escape death 1.60. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.61. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.62. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.63. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.64. /if war and pestilence alike are to ravage the Achaeans. But come, let us ask some seer or priest, or some reader of dreams—for a dream too is from Zeus—who might say why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, whether he finds fault with a vow or a hecatomb; 1.65. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.66. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.67. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.68. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.69. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose Calchas son of Thestor, far the best of bird-diviners, who knew the things that were, and that were to be, and that had been before 1.70. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.71. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.72. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.73. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.74. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.75. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.76. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.77. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.78. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.79. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.80. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.81. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.82. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.83. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.84. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.85. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.86. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.87. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.88. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.89. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.90. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.91. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.92. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.93. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.94. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. Then the blameless seer took heart, and spoke:It is not then because of a vow that he finds fault, nor because of a hecatomb, but because of the priest whom Agamemnon dishonoured, and did not release his daughter nor accept the ransom. 1.95. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.96. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.97. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.98. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.99. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.100. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.101. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.102. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.103. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.104. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.105. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.106. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.107. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.108. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.109. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.110. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.111. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.112. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.113. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.114. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.115. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.116. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.117. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.118. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.119. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.120. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.121. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.122. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.123. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.124. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.125. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.126. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.127. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.128. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. 1.129. /and it is not seemly to gather these things back from the army. But give back the girl to the god, and we Achaeans will recompense you three and fourfold, if ever Zeus grants us to sack the well-walled city of Troy. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.130. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.131. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.132. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.133. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.134. / Do not thus, mighty though you are, godlike Achilles, seek to deceive me with your wit; for you will not get by me nor persuade me. Are you willing, so that your yourself may keep your prize, for me to sit here idly in want, while you order me to give her back? No, if the great-hearted Achaeans give me a prize 1.135. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.136. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.137. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.138. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.139. /suiting it to my mind, so that it will be worth just as much—but if they do not, I myself will come and take your prize, or that of Aias, or that of Odysseus I will seize and bear away. Angry will he be, to whomever I come. But these things we will consider hereafter. 1.140. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.141. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.142. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.143. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.144. /Let us now drag a black ship to the shining sea, and quickly gather suitable rowers into it, and place on board a hecatomb, and embark on it the fair-cheeked daughter of Chryses herself. Let one prudent man be its commander, either Aias, or Idomeneus, or brilliant Odysseus 1.145. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.146. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.147. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.148. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.149. /or you, son of Peleus, of all men most extreme, so that on our behalf you may propitiate the god who strikes from afar by offering sacrifice. Glaring from beneath his brows spoke to him swift-footed Achilles:Ah me, clothed in shamelessness, thinking of profit, how shall any man of the Achaeans obey your words with a ready heart 1.150. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.151. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.152. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.153. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.154. /either to go on a journey or to fight against men with force? It was not on account of the Trojan spearmen that I came here to fight, since they have done no wrong to me. Never have they driven off my cattle or my horses, nor ever in deep-soiled Phthia, nurse of men 1.155. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.156. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.157. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.158. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.159. /did they lay waste the harvest, for many things lie between us—shadowy mountains and sounding sea. But you, shameless one, we followed, so that you might rejoice, seeking to win recompense for Menelaus and for yourself, dog-face, from the Trojans. This you disregard, and take no heed of. 1.160. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.161. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.162. /And now you threaten that you will yourself take my prize away from me, for which I toiled so much, which the sons of the Achaeans gave to me. Never have I prize like yours, whenever the Achaeans sack a well-inhabited citadel of the Trojans. The brunt of furious battle 1.165. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.166. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.167. /do my hands undertake, but if ever an apportionment comes, your prize is far greater, while small but dear is the reward I take to my ships, when I have worn myself out in the fighting. Now I will go back to Phthia, since it is far better to return home with my beaked ships, nor do I intend 1.176. /Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not 1.177. /Most hateful to me are you of all the kings that Zeus nurtures, for always strife is dear to you, and wars and battles. If you are very strong, it was a god, I think, who gave you this gift. Go home with your ships and your companions and lord it over the Myrmidons; for you I care not 1.183. /nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.184. /nor take heed of your wrath. But I will threaten you thus: as Phoebus Apollo takes from me the daughter of Chryses, her with my ship and my companions I will send back, but I will myself come to your tent and take the fair-cheeked Briseis, your prize, so that you will understand 1.185. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.186. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.187. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.188. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.189. /how much mightier I am than you, and another may shrink from declaring himself my equal and likening himself to me to my face. So he spoke. Grief came upon the son of Peleus, and within his shaggy breast his heart was divided, whether he should draw his sharp sword from beside his thigh 1.190. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.191. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.192. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.193. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.194. /and break up the assembly, and slay the son of Atreus, or stay his anger and curb his spirit. While he pondered this in mind and heart, and was drawing from its sheath his great sword, Athene came from heaven. The white-armed goddess Hera had sent her forth 1.195. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.196. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.197. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.198. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.199. /for in her heart she loved and cared for both men alike.She stood behind him, and seized the son of Peleus by his fair hair, appearing to him alone. No one of the others saw her. Achilles was seized with wonder, and turned around, and immediately recognized Pallas Athene. Terribly her eyes shone. 1.200. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.201. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.202. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.203. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.204. /Then he addressed her with winged words, and said:Why now, daughter of aegis-bearing Zeus, have you come? Is it so that you might see the arrogance of Agamemnon, son of Atreus? One thing I will tell you, and I think this will be brought to pass: through his own excessive pride shall he presently lose his life. 1.205. / 1.206. / 1.207. / 1.208. / 1.209. / Him then the goddess, bright-eyed Athene, answered:I have come from heaven to stay your anger, if you will obey, The goddess white-armed Hera sent me forth, for in her heart she loves and cares for both of you. But come, cease from strife, and do not grasp the sword with your hand. 1.210. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.211. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.212. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.213. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.214. /With words indeed taunt him, telling him how it shall be. For thus will I speak, and this thing shall truly be brought to pass. Hereafter three times as many glorious gifts shall be yours on account of this arrogance. But refrain, and obey us. In answer to her spoke swift-footed Achilles: 1.215. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.216. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.217. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.218. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.219. / It is necessary, goddess, to observe the words of you two, however angered a man be in his heart, for is it better so. Whoever obeys the gods, to him do they gladly give ear. He spoke, and stayed his heavy hand on the silver hilt, and back into its sheath thrust the great sword, and did not disobey 1.220. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.221. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.222. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.223. /the word of Athene. She returned to Olympus to the palace of aegis-bearing Zeus, to join the company of the other gods.But the son of Peleus again addressed with violent words the son of Atreus, and in no way ceased from his wrath:Heavy with wine, with the face of a dog but the heart of a deer 1.225. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.226. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.227. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.228. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.229. /never have you had courage to arm for battle along with your people, or go forth to an ambush with the chiefs of the Achaeans. That seems to you even as death. Indeed it is far better throughout the wide camp of the Achaeans to deprive of his prize whoever speaks contrary to you. 1.230. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.231. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.232. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.233. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.234. /People-devouring king, since you rule over nobodies; else, son of Atreus, this would be your last piece of insolence. But I will speak out to you, and will swear thereto a mighty oath: by this staff, that shall never more put forth leaves or shoots since first it left its stump among the mountains 1.235. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.236. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.237. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.238. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.239. /nor shall it again grow green, for the bronze has stripped it on all sides of leaves and bark, and now the sons of the Achaeans carry it in their hands when they act as judges, those who guard the ordices that come from Zeus; and this shall be for you a mighty oath. Surely some day a longing for Achilles will come upon the sons of the Achaeans 1.240. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.241. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.242. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.243. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. 1.244. /one and all, and on that day you will not be able to help them at all, for all your grief, when many shall fall dying before man-slaying Hector. But you will gnaw the heart within you, in anger that you did no honour to the best of the Achaeans. So spoke the son of Peleus, and down to the earth he dashed 1.245. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.246. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.247. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.248. /the staff studded with golden nails, and himself sat down, while over against him the son of Atreus continued to vent his wrath. Then among them arose Nestor, sweet of speech, the clear-voiced orator of the Pylians, from whose tongue flowed speech sweeter than honey. Two generations of mortal men had passed away in his lifetime 1.254. /who had been born and reared with him before in sacred Pylos, and he was king among the third. He with good intent addressed the gathering and spoke among them:Comrades, great grief has come upon the land of Achaea. Truly would Priam and the sons of Priam 1.255. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.256. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.257. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.258. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.259. /rejoice, and the rest of the Trojans would be most glad at heart, were they to hear all this of you two quarrelling, you who are chief among the Danaans in counsel and chief in war. Listen to me, for you are both younger than I. In earlier times I moved among men more warlike than you 1.260. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.261. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.262. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.263. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.264. /and never did they despise me. Such warriors have I never since seen, nor shall I see, as Peirithous was and Dryas, shepherd of the people, and Caeneus and Exadius and godlike Polyphemus, and Theseus, son of Aegeus, a man like the immortals. 1.265. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.266. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.267. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.268. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.269. /Mightiest were these of men reared upon the earth; mightiest were they, and with the mightiest they fought, the mountain-dwelling centaurs, and they destroyed them terribly. With these men I had fellowship, when I came from Pylos, from a distant land far away; for they themselves called me. 1.270. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.271. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.272. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.273. /And I fought on my own; with those men could no one fight of the mortals now upon the earth. Yes, and they listened to my counsel, and obeyed my words. So also should you obey, since to obey is better. Neither do you, mighty though you are, take away the girl 1.275. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.276. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.277. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.278. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.279. /but let her be, as the sons of the Achaeans first gave her to him as a prize; nor do you, son of Peleus, be minded to strive with a king, might against might, for it is no common honour that is the portion of a sceptre-holding king, to whom Zeus gives glory. If you are a stronger fighter, and a goddess mother bore you 1.280. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.281. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.282. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.283. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. 1.284. /yet he is the mightier, since he is king over more. Son of Atreus, check your rage. Indeed, I beg you to let go your anger against Achilles, who is for all the Achaeans a mighty bulwark in evil war. In answer to him spoke lord Agamemnon: 1.287. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.288. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.289. / All these things, old man, to be sure, you have spoken as is right. But this man wishes to be above all others; over all he wishes to rule and over all to be king, and to all to give orders; in this, I think, there is someone who will not obey. If the gods who exist for ever made him a spearman 1.290. /do they therefore license him to keep uttering insults? Brilliant Achilles broke in upon him and replied:Surely I would be called cowardly and of no account, if I am to yield to you in every matter that you say. On others lay these commands, but do not give orders to me 1.297. /for I do not think I shall obey you any longer. And another thing I will tell you, and take it to heart: with my hands I will not fight for the girl's sake either with you nor with any other, since you are taking away what you have given. But of all else that is mine by my swift black ship
2. Homer, Odyssey, 9.225-9.227, 9.253-9.255, 9.267-9.268, 9.270-9.271, 9.275-9.276, 9.279 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Herodotus, Histories, 3.1, 3.31, 3.35, 7.59-7.99, 9.112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.1. Cyrus' son Cambyses was leading an army of his subjects, Ionian and Aeolian Greeks among them, against this Amasis for the following reason. Cambyses had sent a herald to Egypt asking Amasis for his daughter; he asked on the advice of an Egyptian, who advised it out of resentment against Amasis, that out of all the Egyptian physicians Amasis had dragged him away from his wife and children and sent him up to Persia when Cyrus sent to Amasis asking for the best eye-doctor in Egypt . ,Out of resentment, the Egyptian by his advice induced Cambyses to ask Amasis for his daughter, so that Amasis would either be wretched if he gave her, or hated by Cambyses if he did not. Amasis, intimidated by the power of Persia and frightened, could neither give his daughter nor refuse her; for he knew well that Cambyses was not going to take her as his wife but as his concubine. ,After considering the matter, he did as follows. There was a daughter of the former king Apries, all that was left of that family, quite tall and pretty, and her name was Nitetis; this girl Amasis adorned with clothes and gold and sent to Cambyses as his own daughter. ,But after a time, as he embraced her addressing her as the daughter of Amasis, the girl said to him, “O King, you do not understand how you have been made a fool of by Amasis, who dressed me in finery and sent me to you as his own daughter, when I am in fact the daughter of Apries, the ruler Amasis revolted from with the Egyptians and killed.” ,This speech and this crime that occurred turned Cyrus' son Cambyses, furiously angry, against Egypt . So the Persians say. 3.31. This, they say, was the first of Cambyses' evil acts; next, he destroyed his full sister, who had come with him to Egypt, and whom he had taken to wife. ,He married her in this way (for before this, it had by no means been customary for Persians to marry their sisters): Cambyses was infatuated with one of his sisters and when he wanted to marry her, because his intention was contrary to usage, he summoned the royal judges and inquired whether there were any law enjoining one, that so desired, to marry his sister. ,These royal judges are men chosen out from the Persians to function until they die or are detected in some injustice; it is they who decide suits in Persia and interpret the laws of the land; all matters are referred to them. ,These then replied to Cambyses with an answer which was both just and prudent, namely, that they could find no law enjoining a brother to marry his sister; but that they had found a law permitting the King of Persia to do whatever he liked. ,Thus, although they feared Cambyses they did not break the law, and, to save themselves from death for keeping it, they found another law abetting one who wished to marry sisters. ,So Cambyses married the object of his desire; yet not long afterwards he took another sister as well. It was the younger of these who had come with him to Egypt, and whom he now killed. 3.35. Remembering this, then, he said to Prexaspes in his anger: “Judge then if the Persians speak the truth, or rather are themselves out of their minds when they speak of me so. ,Yonder stands your son in the porch; now if I shoot and pierce his heart, that will prove the Persians to be wrong; if I miss, then say that they are right and that I am out of my senses.” ,So saying, he strung his bow and hit the boy, and gave orders to open the fallen body and examine the wound: and the arrow being found in the heart, Cambyses laughed in great glee and said to the boy's father: ,“It is plain, Prexaspes, that I am in my right mind and the Persians mad; now tell me: what man in the world did you ever see that shot so true to the mark?” Prexaspes, it is said, replied (for he saw that Cambyses was mad, and he feared for his own life), “Master, I think that not even the god himself could shoot so true.” ,Thus did Cambyses then; at another time he took twelve Persians, equal to the noblest in the land, convicted them of some minor offense, and buried them alive up to the neck. 7.59. The territory of Doriscus is in Thrace, a wide plain by the sea, and through it flows a great river, the Hebrus; here had been built that royal fortress which is called Doriscus, and a Persian guard had been posted there by Darius ever since the time of his march against Scythia. ,It seemed to Xerxes to be a fit place for him to arrange and number his army, and he did so. All the ships had now arrived at Doriscus, and the captains at Xerxes' command brought them to the beach near Doriscus, where stands the Samothracian city of Sane, and Zone; at the end is Serreum, a well-known headland. This country was in former days possessed by the Cicones. ,To this beach they brought in their ships and hauled them up for rest. Meanwhile Xerxes made a reckoning of his forces at Doriscus. 7.60. I cannot give the exact number that each part contributed to the total, for there is no one who tells us that; but the total of the whole land army was shown to be one million and seven hundred thousand. ,They were counted in this way: ten thousand men were collected in one place, and when they were packed together as closely as could be a line was drawn around them; when this was drawn, the ten thousand were sent away and a wall of stones was built on the line reaching up to a man's navel; ,when this was done, others were brought into the walled space, until in this way all were numbered. When they had been numbered, they were marshalled by nations. 7.61. The men who served in the army were the following: the Persians were equipped in this way: they wore on their heads loose caps called tiaras, and on their bodies embroidered sleeved tunics, with scales of iron like the scales of fish in appearance, and trousers on their legs; for shields they had wicker bucklers, with quivers hanging beneath them; they carried short spears, long bows, and reed arrows, and daggers that hung from the girdle by the right thigh. ,Their commander was Otanes, son of Amestris and father of Xerxes' wife. They were formerly called by the Greeks Cephenes, but by themselves and their neighbors Artaei. ,When Perseus son of Danae and Zeus had come to Cepheus son of Belus and married his daughter Andromeda, a son was born to him whom he called Perses, and he left him there; for Cepheus had no male offspring; it was from this Perses that the Persians took their name. 7.62. The Medes in the army were equipped like the Persians; indeed, that fashion of armor is Median, not Persian. Their commander was Tigranes, an Achaemenid. The Medes were formerly called by everyone Arians, but when the Colchian woman Medea came from Athens to the Arians they changed their name, like the Persians. This is the Medes' own account of themselves. ,The Cissians in the army were equipped like the Persians, but they wore turbans instead of caps. Their commander was Anaphes son of Otanes. The Hyrcanians were armed like the Persians; their leader was Megapanus, who was afterwards the governor of Babylon. 7.63. The Assyrians in the army wore on their heads helmets of twisted bronze made in an outlandish fashion not easy to describe. They carried shields and spears and daggers of Egyptian fashion, and also wooden clubs studded with iron, and they wore linen breastplates. They are called by the Greeks Syrians, but the foreigners called them Assyrians. With them were the Chaldeans. Their commander was Otaspes son of Artachaees. 7.64. The Bactrians in the army wore a headgear very similar to the Median, carrying their native reed bows and short spears. ,The Sacae, who are Scythians, had on their heads tall caps, erect and stiff and tapering to a point; they wore trousers, and carried their native bows, and daggers, and also axes which they call “sagaris.” These were Amyrgian Scythians, but were called Sacae; that is the Persian name for all Scythians. The commander of the Bactrians and Sacae was Hystaspes, son of Darius and Cyrus' daughter Atossa. 7.65. The Indians wore garments of tree-wool, and carried reed bows and iron-tipped reed arrows. Such was their equipment; they were appointed to march under the command of Pharnazathres son of Artabates. 7.66. The Arians were equipped with Median bows, but in all else like the Bactrians; their commander was Sisamnes son of Hydarnes. The Parthians, Chorasmians, Sogdians, Gandarians, and Dadicae in the army had the same equipment as the Bactrians. ,The Parthians and Chorasmians had for their commander Artabazus son of Pharnaces, the Sogdians Azanes son of Artaeus, the Gandarians and Dadicae Artyphius son of Artabanus. 7.67. The Caspians in the army wore cloaks and carried their native reed bows and short swords. Such was their equipment; their leader was Ariomardus, brother of Artyphius. The Sarangae were conspicuous in their dyed garments and knee-high boots, carrying bows and Median spears. Their commander was Pherendates son of Megabazus. ,The Pactyes wore cloaks and carried their native bows and daggers; their commander was Artayntes son of Ithamitres. 7.68. The Utians and Mycians and Paricanians were equipped like the Pactyes; the Utians and Mycians had for their commander Arsamenes son of Darius, the Paricanians Siromitres son of Oeobazus. 7.69. The Arabians wore mantles girded up, and carried at their right side long bows curving backwards. The Ethiopians were wrapped in skins of leopards and lions, and carried bows made of palmwood strips, no less than four cubits long, and short arrows pointed not with iron but with a sharpened stone that they use to carve seals; furthermore, they had spears pointed with a gazelle's horn sharpened like a lance, and also studded clubs. ,When they went into battle they painted half their bodies with gypsum and the other half with vermilion. The Arabians and the Ethiopians who dwell above Egypt had as commander Arsames, the son of Darius and Artystone daughter of Cyrus, whom Darius loved best of his wives; he had an image made of her of hammered gold. 7.70. The Ethiopians above Egypt and the Arabians had Arsames for commander, while the Ethiopians of the east (for there were two kinds of them in the army) served with the Indians; they were not different in appearance from the others, only in speech and hair: the Ethiopians from the east are straight-haired, but the ones from Libya have the woolliest hair of all men. ,These Ethiopians of Asia were for the most part armed like the Indians; but they wore on their heads the skins of horses' foreheads, stripped from the head with ears and mane; the mane served them for a crest, and they wore the horses' ears stiff and upright; for shields they had bucklers of the skin of cranes. 7.71. The Libyans came in leather garments, using javelins of burnt wood. Their commander was Massages son of Oarizus. 7.72. The Paphlagonians in the army had woven helmets on their heads, and small shields and short spears, and also javelins and daggers; they wore their native shoes that reach midway to the knee. The Ligyes and Matieni and Mariandyni and Syrians were equipped like the Paphlagonians. These Syrians are called by the Persians Cappadocians. ,Dotus son of Megasidrus was commander of the Paphlagonians and Matieni, Gobryas son of Darius and Artystone of the Mariandyni and Ligyes and Syrians. 7.73. The Phrygian equipment was very similar to the Paphlagonian, with only a small difference. As the Macedonians say, these Phrygians were called Briges as long as they dwelt in Europe, where they were neighbors of the Macedonians; but when they changed their home to Asia, they changed their name also and were called Phrygians. The Armenians, who are settlers from Phrygia, were armed like the Phrygians. Both these together had as their commander Artochmes, who had married a daughter of Darius. 7.74. The Lydian armor was most similar to the Greek. The Lydians were formerly called Meiones, until they changed their name and were called after Lydus son of Atys. The Mysians wore on their heads their native helmets, carrying small shields and javelins of burnt wood. ,They are settlers from Lydia, and are called Olympieni after the mountain Olympus. The commander of the Lydians and Mysians was that Artaphrenes son of Artaphrenes, who attacked Marathon with Datis. 7.75. The Thracians in the army wore fox-skin caps on their heads, and tunics on their bodies; over these they wore embroidered mantles; they had shoes of fawnskin on their feet and legs; they also had javelins and little shields and daggers. ,They took the name of Bithynians after they crossed over to Asia; before that they were called (as they themselves say) Strymonians, since they lived by the Strymon; they say that they were driven from their homes by Teucrians and Mysians. The commander of the Thracians of Asia was Bassaces son of Artabanus. 7.76. The <Pisidians> had little shields of raw oxhide; each man carried two wolf-hunters' spears; they wore helmets of bronze, and on these helmets were the ears and horns of oxen wrought in bronze, and also crests; their legs were wrapped around with strips of purple rags. Among these men is a place of divination sacred to Ares. 7.77. The Cabelees, who are Meiones and are called Lasonii, had the same equipment as the Cilicians; when I come in my narrative to the place of the Cilicians, I will then declare what it was. The Milyae had short spears and garments fastened by brooches; some of them carried Lycian bows and wore caps of skin on their heads. The commander of all these was Badres son of Hystanes. 7.78. The Moschi wore wooden helmets on their heads, and carried shields and small spears with long points. The Tibareni and Macrones and Mossynoeci in the army were equipped like the Moschi. The commanders who marshalled them were, for the Moschi and Tibareni, Ariomardus son of Darius and Parmys, the daughter of Cyrus' son Smerdis; for the Macrones and Mossynoeci, Artayctes son of Cherasmis, who was governor of Sestus on the Hellespont. 7.79. The Mares wore on their heads their native woven helmets, and carried javelins and small hide shields. The Colchians had wooden helmets and small shields of raw oxhide and short spears, and also swords. The commander of the Mares and Colchians was Pharandates son of Teaspis. The Alarodians and Saspires in the army were armed like the Colchians; Masistius son of Siromitres was their commander. 7.80. The island tribes that came from the Red Sea, and from the islands where the king settles those who are called Exiles, wore dress and armor very similar to the Median. The commander of these islanders was Mardontes son of Bagaeus, who in the next year was general at Mykale and died in the battle. 7.81. These are the nations that marched by the mainland and had their places in the infantry. The commanders of this army were those whom I have mentioned, and they were the ones who marshalled and numbered them and appointed captains of thousands and ten thousands; the captains of ten thousands appointed the captains of hundreds and of tens. There were others who were leaders of companies and nations. 7.82. These were the commanders, as I have said; the generals of these and of the whole infantry were Mardonius son of Gobryas, Tritantaechmes son of that Artabanus who delivered the opinion that there should be no expedition against Hellas, Smerdomenes son of Otanes (these two latter were sons of Darius' brothers, and thus they were Xerxes' cousins), Masistes son of Darius and Atossa, Gergis son of Ariazus, and Megabyzus son of Zopyrus. 7.83. These were the generals of the whole infantry, except the Ten Thousand. Hydarnes son of Hydarnes was general of these picked ten thousand Persians, who were called Immortals for this reason: when any one of them was forced to fall out of the number by death or sickness, another was chosen so that they were never more or fewer than ten thousand. ,The Persians showed the richest adornment of all, and they were the best men in the army. Their equipment was such as I have said; beyond this they stood out by the abundance of gold that they had. They also brought carriages bearing concubines and many well-equipped servants; camels and beasts of burden carried food for them, apart from the rest of the army. 7.84. There are horsemen in these nations, but not all of them furnished cavalry. Only the following did so: the Persians, equipped like their infantry, except that some of them wore headgear of hammered bronze and iron. 7.85. There are also certain nomads called Sagartian; they are Persian in speech, and the fashion of their equipment is somewhat between the Persian and the Pactyan; they furnished eight thousand horsemen. It is their custom to carry no armor of bronze or iron, except only daggers, and to use ropes of twisted leather. ,They go to battle relying on these. This is the manner of fighting of these men: when they are at close quarters with their enemy, they throw their ropes, which have a noose at the end; whatever he catches, horse or man, each man drags to himself, and the enemy is entangled in the coils and slain. Such is their manner of fighting; they were marshalled with the Persians. 7.86. The Median cavalry were equipped like their infantry, and the Cissians similarly. The Indians were armed in the same manner as their infantry; they rode swift horses and drove chariots drawn by horses and wild asses. The Bactrians were equipped as were their foot, and the Caspians in the same manner. ,The Libyans, too, were armed like the men of their infantry, and all of them also drove chariots. In the same manner the Caspians and Paricanians were armed as the men of their infantry. The Arabians had the same equipment as the men of their infantry, and all of them rode on camels no less swift than horses. 7.87. These nations alone were on horseback; the number of the horsemen was shown to be eighty thousand, besides the camels and the chariots. All the rest of the horsemen were ranked with their companies, but the Arabians were posted last. Since horses cannot endure camels, their place was in the rear, so that the horses would not be frightened. 7.88. The captains of cavalry were Harmamithres and Tithaeus, sons of Datis; the third who was captain with them, Pharnuches, had been left behind sick at Sardis. As they set forth from Sardis, an unwelcome mishap befell him: a dog ran under the feet of the horse he was riding, and the horse was taken by surprise and frightened, so it reared up and threw Pharnuches; after his fall he vomited blood and began to waste away. ,The horse was immediately dealt with according to Pharnuces' command; his servants led it away to the place where it had thrown their master, and cut off its legs at the knee. Thus it was that Pharnuches lost his command. 7.89. The number of the triremes was twelve hundred and seven, and they were furnished by the following: the Phoenicians with the Syrians of Palestine furnished three hundred; for their equipment, they had on their heads helmets very close to the Greek in style; they wore linen breastplates, and carried shields without rims, and javelins. ,These Phoenicians formerly dwelt, as they themselves say, by the Red Sea; they crossed from there and now inhabit the seacoast of Syria. This part of Syria as far as Egypt is all called Palestine. ,The Egyptians furnished two hundred ships. They wore woven helmets and carried hollow shields with broad rims, and spears for sea-warfare, and great battle-axes. Most of them wore cuirasses and carried long swords. 7.90. Such was their armor. The Cyprians furnished a hundred and fifty ships; for their equipment, their princes wore turbans wrapped around their heads, and the people wore tunics, but in all else they were like the Greeks. These are their tribes: some are from Salamis and Athens, some from Arcadia, some from Cythnus, some from Phoenice, and some from Ethiopia, as the Cyprians themselves say. 7.91. The Cilicians furnished a hundred ships. They also wore on their heads their native helmets, carried bucklers of raw oxhide for shields, and were clad in woollen tunics; each had two javelins and a sword very close in style to the knives of Egypt. These Cilicians were formerly called Hypachaei, and took their name from Cilix son of Agenor, a Phoenician. The Pamphylians furnished a hundred ships: they were armed like the Greeks. These Pamphylians are descended from the Trojans of the diaspora who followed Amphilochus and Calchas. 7.92. The Lycians furnished fifty ships; they wore cuirasses and greaves, and carried cornel-wood bows and unfeathered arrows and javelins; goat-skins hung from their shoulders, and they wore on their heads caps crowned with feathers; they also had daggers and scimitars. The Lycians are from Crete and were once called Termilae; they took their name from Lycus son of Pandion, an Athenian. 7.93. The Dorians of Asia furnished thirty ships; their armor was Greek; they are of Peloponnesian descent. The Carians furnished seventy ships; they had scimitars and daggers, but the rest of their equipment was Greek. I have said in the beginning of my history what they were formerly called. 7.94. The Ionians furnished a hundred ships; their equipment was like the Greek. These Ionians, as long as they were in the Peloponnese, dwelt in what is now called Achaia, and before Danaus and Xuthus came to the Peloponnese, as the Greeks say, they were called Aegialian Pelasgians. They were named Ionians after Ion the son of Xuthus. 7.95. The islanders provided seventeen ships and were armed like Greeks; they were also of Pelasgian stock, which was later called Ionian for the same reason as were the Ionians of the twelve cities, who came from Athens. The Aeolians furnished sixty ships and were equipped like Greeks; formerly they were called Pelasgian, as the Greek story goes. ,of the people of the Hellespont, the people of Abydos had been charged by the king to remain at home and guard the bridges; the rest of the people from Pontus who came with the army furnished a hundred ships and were equipped like Greeks. They were settlers from the Ionians and Dorians. 7.96. Persians and Medes and Sacae served as soldiers on all the ships. The most seaworthy ships were furnished by the Phoenicians, and among them by the Sidonians. All of these, as with those who were marshalled in the infantry, each had their native leaders, whose names I do not record, since it is not necessary for the purpose of my history. ,The leaders of each nation are not worthy of mention, and every city of each nation had a leader of its own. These came not as generals but as slaves, like the rest of the expedition; I have already said who were the generals of supreme authority and the Persian commanders of each nation. 7.97. The admirals of the navy were Ariabignes son of Darius, Prexaspes son of Aspathines, Megabazus son of Megabates, and Achaemenes son of Darius. Ariabignes, son of Darius and Gobryas' daughter, was admiral of the Ionian and Carian fleet; the admiral of the Egyptians was Achaemenes, full brother of Xerxes; and the two others were admirals of the rest. The ships of thirty and of fifty oars, the light galleys, and the great transports for horses came to a total of three thousand all together. 7.98. After the admirals, the most famous of those on board were these: from Sidon, Tetramnestus son of Anysus; from Tyre, Matten son of Siromus; from Aradus, Merbalus son of Agbalus; from Cilicia, Syennesis son of Oromedon; from Lycia, Cyberniscus son of Sicas; from Cyprus, Gorgus son of Chersis and Timonax son of Timagoras; and from Caria, Histiaeus son of Tymnes, Pigres son of Hysseldomus, and Damasithymus son of Candaules. 7.99. I see no need to mention any of the other captains except Artemisia. I find it a great marvel that a woman went on the expedition against Hellas: after her husband died, she took over his tyranny, though she had a young son, and followed the army from youthful spirits and manliness, under no compulsion. ,Artemisia was her name, and she was the daughter of Lygdamis; on her fathers' side she was of Halicarnassian lineage, and on her mothers' Cretan. She was the leader of the men of Halicarnassus and Cos and Nisyrus and Calydnos, and provided five ships. ,Her ships were reputed to be the best in the whole fleet after the ships of Sidon, and she gave the king the best advice of all his allies. The cities that I said she was the leader of are all of Dorian stock, as I can show, since the Halicarnassians are from Troezen, and the rest are from Epidaurus. 9.112. In the meantime, while Xerxes talked with his brother, Amestris sent for Xerxes' guards and treated Masistes' wife very cruelly; she cut off the woman's breasts and threw them to dogs, and her nose and ears and lips also, and cut out her tongue. Then she sent her home after she had undergone this dreadful ordeal.
4. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.17, 1.28-1.29, 1.462-1.474, 1.492-1.495, 1.861-1.876, 1.1284-1.1344, 2.1-2.29, 3.1, 3.169-3.178, 3.190-3.195, 3.210-3.266, 3.270-3.376, 3.378-3.448, 3.453-3.458, 3.475-3.483, 3.502-3.516, 3.540-3.554, 3.556-3.566, 3.577, 3.580-3.588, 3.594-3.600, 3.915-3.946, 3.1105-3.1107, 3.1194-3.1224, 3.1248-3.1255, 3.1268-3.1277, 3.1347-3.1348, 4.11, 4.15, 4.75-4.81, 4.212-4.235, 4.338-4.393, 4.1051, 4.1209 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.17. ἠὲ καὶ ἀλλοδαποῖσι μετʼ ἀνδράσι νόστον ὀλέσσῃ. 1.28. φηγοὶ δʼ ἀγριάδες, κείνης ἔτι σήματα μολπῆς 1.29. ἀκτῆς Θρηικίης Ζώνης ἔπι τηλεθόωσαι 1.462. τὸν δʼ ἄρʼ ὑποφρασθεὶς μεγάλῃ ὀπὶ νείκεσεν Ἴδας· 1.463. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε μετὰ φρεσὶ μῆτιν ἑλίσσεις; 1.464. αὔδα ἐνὶ μέσσοισι τεὸν νόον. ἦέ σε δαμνᾷ 1.465. τάρβος ἐπιπλόμενον, τό τʼ ἀνάλκιδας ἄνδρας ἀτύζει; 1.466. ἴστω νῦν δόρυ θοῦρον, ὅτῳ περιώσιον ἄλλων 1.467. κῦδος ἐνὶ πτολέμοισιν ἀείρομαι, οὐδέ μʼ ὀφέλλει 1.468. Ζεὺς τόσον, ὁσσάτιόν περ ἐμὸν δόρυ, μή νύ τι πῆμα 1.469. λοίγιον ἔσσεσθαι, μηδʼ ἀκράαντον ἄεθλον 1.470. Ἴδεω ἑσπομένοιο, καὶ εἰ θεὸς ἀντιόῳτο. 1.471. τοῖόν μʼ Ἀρήνηθεν ἀοσσητῆρα κομίζεις.’ 1.472. ἦ, καὶ ἐπισχόμενος πλεῖον δέπας ἀμφοτέρῃσιν 1.473. πῖνε χαλίκρητον λαρὸν μέθυ· δεύετο δʼ οἴνῳ 1.474. χείλεα, κυάνεαί τε γενειάδες· οἱ δʼ ὁμάδησαν 1.492. Χώετʼ ἐνιπτάζων· προτέρω δέ κε νεῖκος ἐτύχθη 1.493. εἰ μὴ δηριόωντας ὁμοκλήσαντες ἑταῖροι 1.494. αὐτός τʼ Αἰσονίδης κατερήτυεν· ἂν δὲ καὶ Ὀρφεὺς 1.495. λαιῇ ἀνασχόμενος κίθαριν πείραζεν ἀοιδῆς. 1.861. ἀμβολίη δʼ εἰς ἦμαρ ἀεὶ ἐξ ἤματος ἦεν 1.862. ναυτιλίης· δηρὸν δʼ ἂν ἐλίνυον αὖθι μένοντες 1.863. εἰ μὴ ἀολλίσσας ἑτάρους ἀπάνευθε γυναικῶν 1.864. Ἡρακλέης τοίοισιν ἐνιπτάζων μετέειπεν· 1.865. ‘δαιμόνιοι, πάτρης ἐμφύλιον αἷμʼ ἀποέργει 1.866. ἡμέας; ἦε γάμων ἐπιδευέες ἐνθάδʼ ἔβημεν 1.867. κεῖθεν, ὀνοσσάμενοι πολιήτιδας; αὖθι δʼ ἕαδεν 1.868. ναίοντας λιπαρὴν ἄροσιν Λήμνοιο ταμέσθαι; 1.869. οὐ μὰν εὐκλειεῖς γε σὺν ὀθνείῃσι γυναιξὶν 1.870. ἐσσόμεθʼ ὧδʼ ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἐελμένοι· οὐδέ τι κῶας 1.871. αὐτόματον δώσει τις ἑλὼν θεὸς εὐξαμένοισιν. 1.872. ἴομεν αὖτις ἕκαστοι ἐπὶ σφέα· τὸν δʼ ἐνὶ λέκτροις 1.873. Ὑψιπύλης εἰᾶτε πανήμερον, εἰσόκε Λῆμνον 1.874. παισὶν ἐσανδρώσῃ, μεγάλη τέ ἑ βάξις ἵκηται.’ 1.875. ὧς νείκεσσεν ὅμιλον· ἐναντία δʼ οὔ νύ τις ἔτλη 1.876. ὄμματʼ ἀνασχεθέειν, οὐδὲ προτιμυθήσασθαι· 1.1284. ἐν δέ σφιν κρατερὸν νεῖκος πέσεν, ἐν δὲ κολῳὸς 1.1285. ἄσπετος, εἰ τὸν ἄριστον ἀποπρολιπόντες ἔβησαν 1.1286. σφωιτέρων ἑτάρων. ὁ δʼ ἀμηχανίῃσιν ἀτυχθεὶς 1.1287. οὔτε τι τοῖον ἔπος μετεφώνεεν, οὔτε τι τοῖον 1.1288. Αἰσονίδης· ἀλλʼ ἧστο βαρείῃ νειόθεν ἄτῃ 1.1289. θυμὸν ἔδων· Τελαμῶνα δʼ ἕλεν χόλος, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 1.1290. ‘ἧσʼ αὔτως εὔκηλος, ἐπεί??ύ τοι ἄρμενον ἦεν 1.1291. Ἡρακλῆα λιπεῖν· σέο δʼ ἔκτοθι μῆτις ὄρωρεν 1.1292. ὄφρα τὸ κείνου κῦδος ἀνʼ Ἑλλάδα μή σε καλύψῃ 1.1293. αἴ κε θεοὶ δώωσιν ὑπότροπον οἴκαδε νόστον. 1.1294. ἀλλὰ τί μύθων ἦδος; ἐπεὶ καὶ νόσφιν ἑταίρων 1.1295. εἶμι τεῶν, οἳ τόνγε δόλον συνετεκτήναντο.’ 1.1296. ἦ, καὶ ἐς Ἁγνιάδην Τῖφυν θόρε· τὼ δέ οἱ ὄσσε 1.1297. ὄστλιγγες μαλεροῖο πυρὸς ὣς ἰνδάλλοντο. 1.1298. καί νύ κεν ἂψ ὀπίσω Μυσῶν ἐπὶ γαῖαν ἵκοντο 1.1299. λαῖτμα βιησάμενοι ἀνέμου τʼ ἄλληκτον ἰωήν 1.1300. εἰ μὴ Θρηικίοιο δύω υἷες Βορέαο 1.1301. Αἰακίδην χαλεποῖσιν ἐρητύεσκον ἔπεσσιν 1.1302. σχέτλιοι· ἦ τέ σφιν στυγερὴ τίσις ἔπλετʼ ὀπίσσω 1.1303. χερσὶν ὑφʼ Ἡρακλῆος, ὅ μιν δίζεσθαι ἔρυκον. 1.1304. ἄθλων γὰρ Πελίαο δεδουπότος ἂψ ἀνιόντας 1.1305. τήνῳ ἐν ἀμφιρύτῃ πέφνεν, καὶ ἀμήσατο γαῖαν 1.1306. ἀμφʼ αὐτοῖς, στήλας τε δύω καθύπερθεν ἔτευξεν 1.1307. ὧν ἑτέρη, θάμβος περιώσιον ἀνδράσι λεύσσειν 1.1308. κίνυται ἠχήεντος ὑπὸ πνοιῇ βορέαο. 1.1309. καὶ τὰ μὲν ὧς ἤμελλε μετὰ χρόνον ἐκτελέεσθαι. 1.1310. τοῖσιν δὲ Γλαῦκος βρυχίης ἁλὸς ἐξεφαάνθη 1.1311. Νηρῆος θείοιο πολυφράδμων ὑποφήτης· 1.1312. ὕψι δὲ λαχνῆέν τε κάρη καὶ στήθεʼ ἀείρας 1.1313. νειόθεν ἐκ λαγόνων στιβαρῇ ἐπορέξατο χειρὶ 1.1314. νηίου ὁλκαίοιο, καὶ ἴαχεν ἐσσυμένοισιν· 1.1315. ‘τίπτε παρὲκ μεγάλοιο Διὸς μενεαίνετε βουλὴν 1.1316. Αἰήτεω πτολίεθρον ἄγειν θρασὺν Ἡρακλῆα; 1.1317. Ἄργεΐ οἱ μοῖρʼ ἐστὶν ἀτασθάλῳ Εὐρυσθῆι 1.1318. ἐκπλῆσαι μογέοντα δυώδεκα πάντας ἀέθλους 1.1319. ναίειν δʼ ἀθανάτοισι συνέστιον, εἴ κʼ ἔτι παύρους 1.1320. ἐξανύσῃ· τῶ μή τι ποθὴ κείνοιο πελέσθω. 1.1321. αὔτως δʼ αὖ Πολύφημον ἐπὶ προχοῇσι Κίοιο 1.1322. πέπρωται Μυσοῖσι περικλεὲς ἄστυ καμόντα 1.1323. μοῖραν ἀναπλήσειν Χαλύβων ἐν ἀπείρονι γαίῃ. 1.1324. αὐτὰρ Ὕλαν φιλότητι θεὰ ποιήσατο νύμφη 1.1325. ὃν πόσιν, οἷό περ οὕνεκʼ ἀποπλαγχθέντες ἔλειφθεν.’ 1.1326. ἦ, καὶ κῦμʼ ἀλίαστον ἐφέσσατο νειόθι δύψας· 1.1327. ἀμφὶ δέ οἱ δίνῃσι κυκώμενον ἄφρεεν ὕδωρ 1.1328. πορφύρεον, κοίλην δὲ διὲξ ἁλὸς ἔκλυσε νῆα. 1.1329. γήθησαν δʼ ἥρωες· ὁ δʼ ἐσσυμένως ἐβεβήκει 1.1330. Αἰακίδης Τελαμὼν ἐς Ἰήσονα, χεῖρα δὲ χειρὶ 1.1331. ἄκρην ἀμφιβαλὼν προσπτύξατο, φώνησέν τε· 1.1332. ‘Αἰσονίδη, μή μοί τι χολώσεαι, ἀφραδίῃσιν 1.1333. εἴ τί περ ἀασάμην· πέρι γάρ μʼ ἄχος εἷλεν ἐνισπεῖν 1.1334. μῦθον ὑπερφίαλόν τε καὶ ἄσχετον, ἀλλʼ ἀνέμοισιν 1.1335. δώομεν ἀμπλακίην, ὡς καὶ πάρος εὐμενέοντες.’ 1.1336. τὸν δʼ αὖτʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸς ἐπιφραδέως προσέειπεν· 1.1337. ‘ὦ πέπον, ἦ μάλα δή με κακῷ ἐκυδάσσαο μύθῳ 1.1338. φὰς ἐνὶ τοῖσιν ἅπασιν ἐνηέος ἀνδρὸς ἀλείτην 1.1339. ἔμμεναι. ἀλλʼ οὐ θήν τοι ἀδευκέα μῆνιν ἀέξω 1.1340. πρίν περ ἀνιηθείς· ἐπεὶ οὐ περὶ πώεσι μήλων 1.1341. οὐδὲ περὶ κτεάτεσσι χαλεψάμενος μενέηνας 1.1342. ἀλλʼ ἑτάρου περὶ φωτός. ἔολπα δέ τοι σὲ καὶ ἄλλῳ 1.1343. ἀμφʼ ἐμεῦ, εἰ τοιόνδε πέλοι ποτέ, δηρίσασθαι.’ 1.1344. ἦ ῥα, καὶ ἀρθμηθέντες, ὅπῃ πάρος, ἑδριόωντο. 2.1. ἔνθα δʼ ἔσαν σταθμοί τε βοῶν αὖλίς τʼ Ἀμύκοιο 2.2. Βεβρύκων βασιλῆος ἀγήνορος, ὅν ποτε νύμφη 2.3. τίκτε Ποσειδάωνι Γενεθλίῳ εὐνηθεῖσα 2.4. Βιθυνὶς Μελίη, ὑπεροπληέστατον ἀνδρῶν· 2.5. ὅς τʼ ἐπὶ καὶ ξείνοισιν ἀεικέα θεσμὸν ἔθηκεν 2.6. μήτινʼ ἀποστείχειν, πρὶν πειρήσασθαι ἑοῖο 2.7. πυγμαχίης· πολέας δὲ περικτιόνων ἐδάιξεν. 2.8. καὶ δὲ τότε προτὶ νῆα κιών, χρειώ μιν ἐρέσθαι 2.9. ναυτιλίης, οἵ τʼ εἶεν, ὑπερβασίῃσιν ἄτισσεν 2.10. τοῖον δʼ ἐν πάντεσσι παρασχεδὸν ἔκφατο μῦθον· 2.11. ‘Κέκλυθʼ, ἁλίπλαγκτοι, τάπερ ἴδμεναι ὔμμιν ἔοικεν. 2.12. οὔτινα θέσμιόν ἐστιν ἀφορμηθέντα νέεσθαι 2.13. ἀνδρῶν ὀθνείων, ὅς κεν Βέβρυξι πελάσσῃ 2.14. πρὶν χείρεσσιν ἐμῇσιν ἑὰς ἀνὰ χεῖρας ἀεῖραι. 2.15. τῶ καί μοι τὸν ἄριστον ἀποκριδὸν οἶον ὁμίλου 2.16. πυγμαχίῃ στήσασθε καταυτόθι δηρινθῆναι. 2.17. εἰ δʼ ἂν ἀπηλεγέοντες ἐμὰς πατέοιτε θέμιστας 2.18. ἧ κέν τις στυγερῶς κρατερὴ ἐπιέψετʼ ἀνάγκη.’ 2.19. ἦ ῥα μέγα φρονέων· τοὺς δʼ ἄγριος εἰσαΐοντας 2.20. εἷλε χόλος· περὶ δʼ αὖ Πολυδεύκεα τύψεν ὁμοκλη 2.21. αἶψα δʼ ἑῶν ἑτάρων πρόμος ἵστατο, φώνησέν τε· 2.22. ‘ἴσχεο νῦν, μηδʼ ἄμμι κακήν, ὅτις εὔχεαι εἶναι 2.23. φαῖνε βίην· θεσμοῖς γὰρ ὑπείξομεν, ὡς ἀγορεύεις. 2.24. αὐτὸς ἑκὼν ἤδη τοι ὑπίσχομαι ἀντιάασθαι.’ 2.25. ὧς φάτʼ ἀπηλεγέως· ὁ δʼ ἐσέδρακεν ὄμμαθʼ ἑλίξας 2.26. ὥστε λέων ὑπʼ ἄκοντι τετυμμένος, ὅν τʼ ἐν ὄρεσσιν 2.27. ἀνέρες ἀμφιπένονται· ὁ δʼ ἰλλόμενός περ ὁμίλῳ 2.28. τῶν μὲν ἔτʼ οὐκ ἀλέγει, ἐπὶ δʼ ὄσσεται οἰόθεν οἶον 2.29. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς μιν ἔτυψε παροίτατος, οὐδʼ ἐδάμασσεν. 3.1. εἰ δʼ ἄγε νῦν, Ἐρατώ, παρά θʼ ἵστασο, καί μοι ἔνισπε 3.190. πρηΰνας. ὁ δὲ καί ποτʼ ἀμύμονα Φρίξον ἔδεκτο 3.191. μητρυιῆς φεύγοντα δόλον πατρός τε θυηλάς. 3.192. πάντες ἐπεὶ πάντῃ καὶ ὅτις μάλα κύντατος ἀνδρῶν 3.193. ξεινίου αἰδεῖται Ζηνὸς θέμιν ἠδʼ ἀλεγίζει.’ 3.210. τοῖσι δὲ νισσομένοις Ἥρη φίλα μητιόωσα 3.211. ἠέρα πουλὺν ἐφῆκε διʼ ἄστεος, ὄφρα λάθοιεν 3.212. Κόλχων μυρίον ἔθνος ἐς Αἰήταο κιόντες. 3.213. ὦκα δʼ ὅτʼ ἐκ πεδίοιο πόλιν καὶ δώμαθʼ ἵκοντο 3.214. Αἰήτεω, τότε δʼ αὖτις ἀπεσκέδασεν νέφος Ἥρη. 3.215. ἔσταν δʼ ἐν προμολῇσι τεθηπότες ἕρκεʼ ἄνακτος 3.216. εὐρείας τε πύλας καὶ κίονας, οἳ περὶ τοίχους 3.217. ἑξείης ἄνεχον· θριγκὸς δʼ ἐφύπερθε δόμοιο 3.218. λαΐνεος χαλκέῃσιν ἐπὶ γλυφίδεσσιν ἀρήρει. 3.219. εὔκηλοι δʼ ὑπὲρ οὐδὸν ἔπειτʼ ἔβαν. ἄγχι δὲ τοῖο 3.220. ἡμερίδες χλοεροῖσι καταστεφέες πετάλοισιν 3.221. ὑψοῦ ἀειρόμεναι μέγʼ ἐθήλεον. αἱ δʼ ὑπὸ τῇσιν 3.222. ἀέναοι κρῆναι πίσυρες ῥέον, ἃς ἐλάχηνεν 3.223. Ἥφαιστος. καί ῥʼ ἡ μέν ἀναβλύεσκε γάλακτι 3.224. ἡ δʼ οἴνῳ, τριτάτη δὲ θυώδεϊ νᾶεν ἀλοιφῇ· 3.225. ἡ δʼ ἄρʼ ὕδωρ προρέεσκε, τὸ μέν ποθι δυομένῃσιν 3.226. θέρμετο Πληιάδεσσιν, ἀμοιβηδὶς δʼ ἀνιούσαις 3.227. κρυστάλλῳ ἴκελον κοίλης ἀνεκήκιε πέτρης. 3.228. τοῖʼ ἄρʼ ἐνὶ μεγάροισι Κυταιέος Αἰήταο 3.229. τεχνήεις Ἥφαιστος ἐμήσατο θέσκελα ἔργα. 3.230. καί οἱ χαλκόποδας ταύρους κάμε, χάλκεα δέ σφεων 3.231. ἦν στόματʼ, ἐκ δὲ πυρὸς δεινὸν σέλας ἀμπνείεσκον· 3.232. πρὸς δὲ καὶ αὐτόγυον στιβαροῦ ἀδάμαντος ἄροτρον 3.233. ἤλασεν, Ἠελίῳ τίνων χάριν, ὅς ῥά μιν ἵπποις 3.234. δέξατο, Φλεγραίῃ κεκμηότα δηιοτῆτι. 3.235. ἔνθα δὲ καὶ μέσσαυλος ἐλήλατο· τῇ δʼ ἐπὶ πολλαὶ 3.236. δικλίδες εὐπηγεῖς θάλαμοί τʼ ἔσαν ἔνθα καὶ ἔνθα· 3.237. δαιδαλέη δʼ αἴθουσα παρὲξ ἑκάτερθε τέτυκτο. 3.238. λέχρις δʼ αἰπύτεροι δόμοι ἕστασαν ἀμφοτέρωθεν. 3.239. τῶν ἤτοι ἄλλῳ μέν, ὅτις καὶ ὑπείροχος ἦεν 3.240. κρείων Αἰήτης σὺν ἑῇ ναίεσκε δάμαρτι· 3.241. ἄλλῳ δʼ Ἄψυρτος ναῖεν πάις Αἰήταο. 3.242. τὸν μὲν Καυκασίη νύμφη τέκεν Ἀστερόδεια 3.243. πρίν περ κουριδίην θέσθαι Εἰδυῖαν ἄκοιτιν 3.244. Τηθύος Ὠκεανοῦ τε πανοπλοτάτην γεγαυῖαν. 3.245. καί μιν Κόλχων υἷες ἐπωνυμίην Φαέθοντα 3.246. ἔκλεον, οὕνεκα πᾶσι μετέπρεπεν ἠιθέοισιν. 3.247. τοὺς δʼ ἔχον ἀμφίπολοί τε καὶ Αἰήταο θύγατρες 3.248. ἄμφω, Χαλκιόπη Μήδειά τε. τὴν μὲν ἄρʼ οἵγε 3.249. ἐκ θαλάμου θάλαμόνδε κασιγνήτην μετιοῦσαν-- 3.250. Ἥρη γάρ μιν ἔρυκε δόμῳ· πρὶν δʼ οὔτι θάμιζεν 3.251. ἐν μεγάροις, Ἑκάτης δὲ πανήμερος ἀμφεπονεῖτο 3.252. νηόν, ἐπεί ῥα θεᾶς αὐτὴ πέλεν ἀρήτειρα-- 3.253. καί σφεας ὡς ἴδεν ἆσσον, ἀνίαχεν· ὀξὺ δʼ ἄκουσεν 3.254. Χαλκιόπη· δμωαὶ δὲ ποδῶν προπάροιθε βαλοῦσαι 3.255. νήματα καὶ κλωστῆρας ἀολλέες ἔκτοθι πᾶσαι 3.256. ἔδραμον. ἡ δʼ ἅμα τοῖσιν ἑοὺς υἱῆας ἰδοῦσα 3.257. ὑψοῦ χάρματι χεῖρας ἀνέσχεθεν· ὧς δὲ καὶ αὐτοὶ 3.258. μητέρα δεξιόωντο, καὶ ἀμφαγάπαζον ἰδόντες 3.259. γηθόσυνοι· τοῖον δὲ κινυρομένη φάτο μῦθον· 3.260. ‘ἔμπης οὐκ ἄρʼ ἐμέλλετʼ ἀκηδείῃ με λιπόντες 3.261. τηλόθι πλάγξασθαι· μετὰ δʼ ὑμέας ἔτραπεν αἶσα. 3.262. δειλὴ ἐγώ, οἷον πόθον Ἑλλάδος ἔκποθεν ἄτης 3.263. λευγαλέης Φρίξοιο ἐφημοσύνῃσιν ἕλεσθε 3.264. πατρός. ὁ μὲν θνῄσκων στυγερὰς ἐπετείλατʼ ἀνίας 3.265. ἡμετέρῃ κραδίῃ. τί δέ κεν πόλιν Ὀρχομενοῖο 3.266. ὅστις ὅδʼ Ὀρχομενός, κτεάνων Ἀθάμαντος ἕκητι 3.270. Χαλκιόπης ἀίουσα· τὸ δʼ αὐτίκα πᾶν ὁμάδοιο 3.271. ἕρκος ἐπεπλήθει. τοὶ μὲν μέγαν ἀμφιπένοντο 3.272. ταῦρον ἅλις δμῶες· τοὶ δὲ ξύλα κάγκανα χαλκῷ 3.273. κόπτον· τοὶ δὲ λοετρὰ πυρὶ ζέον· οὐδέ τις ἦεν 3.274. ὃς καμάτου μεθίεσκεν, ὑποδρήσσων βασιλῆι. 3.275. τόφρα δʼ Ἔρως πολιοῖο διʼ ἠέρος ἷξεν ἄφαντος 3.276. τετρηχώς, οἷόν τε νέαις ἐπὶ φορβάσιν οἶστρος 3.277. τέλλεται, ὅν τε μύωπα βοῶν κλείουσι νομῆες. 3.278. ὦκα δʼ ὑπὸ φλιὴν προδόμῳ ἔνι τόξα τανύσσας 3.279. ἰοδόκης ἀβλῆτα πολύστονον ἐξέλετʼ ἰόν. 3.280. ἐκ δʼ ὅγε καρπαλίμοισι λαθὼν ποσὶν οὐδὸν ἄμειψεν 3.281. ὀξέα δενδίλλων· αὐτῷ ὑπὸ βαιὸς ἐλυσθεὶς 3.282. Αἰσονίδῃ γλυφίδας μέσσῃ ἐνικάτθετο νευρῇ 3.283. ἰθὺς δʼ ἀμφοτέρῃσι διασχόμενος παλάμῃσιν 3.284. ἧκʼ ἐπὶ Μηδείῃ· τὴν δʼ ἀμφασίη λάβε θυμόν. 3.285. αὐτὸς δʼ ὑψορόφοιο παλιμπετὲς ἐκ μεγάροιο 3.286. καγχαλόων ἤιξε· βέλος δʼ ἐνεδαίετο κούρῃ 3.287. νέρθεν ὑπὸ κραδίῃ, φλογὶ εἴκελον· ἀντία δʼ αἰεὶ 3.288. βάλλεν ὑπʼ Αἰσονίδην ἀμαρύγματα, καί οἱ ἄηντο 3.289. στηθέων ἐκ πυκιναὶ καμάτῳ φρένες, οὐδέ τινʼ ἄλλην 3.290. μνῆστιν ἔχεν, γλυκερῇ δὲ κατείβετο θυμὸν ἀνίῃ. 3.291. ὡς δὲ γυνὴ μαλερῷ περὶ κάρφεα χεύατο δαλῷ 3.292. χερνῆτις, τῇπερ ταλασήια ἔργα μέμηλεν 3.293. ὥς κεν ὑπωρόφιον νύκτωρ σέλας ἐντύναιτο 3.294. ἄγχι μάλʼ ἐγρομένη· τὸ δʼ ἀθέσφατον ἐξ ὀλίγοιο 3.295. δαλοῦ ἀνεγρόμενον σὺν κάρφεα πάντʼ ἀμαθύνει· 3.296. τοῖος ὑπὸ κραδίῃ εἰλυμένος αἴθετο λάθρῃ 3.297. οὖλος Ἔρως· ἁπαλὰς δὲ μετετρωπᾶτο παρειὰς 3.298. ἐς χλόον, ἄλλοτʼ ἔρευθος, ἀκηδείῃσι νόοιο. 3.299. δμῶες δʼ ὁππότε δή σφιν ἐπαρτέα θῆκαν ἐδωδήν 3.300. αὐτοί τε λιαροῖσιν ἐφαιδρύναντο λοετροῖς 3.301. ἀσπασίως δόρπῳ τε ποτῆτί τε θυμὸν ἄρεσσαν. 3.302. ἐκ δὲ τοῦ Αἰήτης σφετέρης ἐρέεινε θυγατρὸς 3.303. υἱῆας τοίοισι παρηγορέων ἐπέεσσιν· 3.304. ‘παιδὸς ἐμῆς κοῦροι Φρίξοιό τε, τὸν περὶ πάντων 3.305. ξείνων ἡμετέροισιν ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἔτισα 3.306. πῶς Αἶάνδε νέεσθε παλίσσυτοι; ἦέ τις ἄτη 3.307. σωομένοις μεσσηγὺς ἐνέκλασεν; οὐ μὲν ἐμεῖο 3.308. πείθεσθε προφέροντος ἀπείρονα μέτρα κελεύθου. 3.309. ᾔδειν γάρ ποτε πατρὸς ἐν ἅρμασιν Ἠελίοιο 3.310. δινεύσας, ὅτʼ ἐμεῖο κασιγνήτην ἐκόμιζεν 3.311. Κίρκην ἑσπερίης εἴσω χθονός, ἐκ δʼ ἱκόμεσθα 3.312. ἀκτὴν ἠπείρου Τυρσηνίδος, ἔνθʼ ἔτι νῦν περ 3.313. ναιετάει, μάλα πολλὸν ἀπόπροθι Κολχίδος αἴης. 3.314. ἀλλὰ τί μύθων ἦδος; ἃ δʼ ἐν ποσὶν ὗμιν ὄρωρεν 3.315. εἴπατʼ ἀριφραδέως, ἠδʼ οἵτινες οἵδʼ ἐφέπονται 3.316. ἀνέρες, ὅππῃ τε γλαφυρῆς ἐκ νηὸς ἔβητε.’ 3.317. τοῖά μιν ἐξερέοντα κασιγνήτων προπάροιθεν 3.318. Ἄργος ὑποδδείσας ἀμφὶ στόλῳ Αἰσονίδαο 3.319. μειλιχίως προσέειπεν, ἐπεὶ προγενέστερος ἦεν· 3.320. ‘Αἰήτη, κείνην μὲν ἄφαρ διέχευαν ἄελλαι 3.321. ζαχρηεῖς· αὐτοὺς δʼ ἐπὶ δούρασι πεπτηῶτας 3.322. νήσου Ἐνυαλίοιο ποτὶ ξερὸν ἔκβαλε κῦμα 3.323. λυγαίῃ ὑπὸ νυκτί· θεὸς δέ τις ἄμμʼ ἐσάωσεν. 3.324. οὐδὲ γὰρ αἳ τὸ πάροιθεν ἐρημαίην κατὰ νῆσον 3.325. ηὐλίζοντʼ ὄρνιθες Ἀρήιαι, οὐδʼ ἔτι κείνας 3.326. εὕρομεν. ἀλλʼ οἵγʼ ἄνδρες ἀπήλασαν, ἐξαποβάντες 3.327. νηὸς ἑῆς προτέρῳ ἐνὶ ἤματι· καί σφʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.328. ἡμέας οἰκτείρων Ζηνὸς νόος, ἠέ τις αἶσα 3.329. αὐτίκʼ ἐπεὶ καὶ βρῶσιν ἅλις καὶ εἵματʼ ἔδωκαν 3.330. οὔνομά τε Φρίξοιο περικλεὲς εἰσαΐοντες 3.331. ἠδʼ αὐτοῖο σέθεν· μετὰ γὰρ τεὸν ἄστυ νέονται. 3.332. χρειὼ δʼ ἢν ἐθέλῃς ἐξίδμεναι, οὔ σʼ ἐπικεύσω. 3.333. τόνδε τις ἱέμενος πάτρης ἀπάνευθεν ἐλάσσαι 3.334. καὶ κτεάνων βασιλεὺς περιώσιον, οὕνεκεν ἀλκῇ 3.335. σφωιτέρῃ τάντεσσι μετέπρεπεν Αἰολίδῃσιν 3.336. πέμπει δεῦρο νέεσθαι ἀμήχανον· οὐδʼ ὑπαλύξειν 3.337. στεῦται ἀμειλίκτοιο Διὸς θυμαλγέα μῆνιν 3.338. καὶ χόλον, οὐδʼ ἄτλητον ἄγος Φρίξοιό τε ποινὰς 3.339. Αἰολιδέων γενεήν, πρὶν ἐς Ἑλλάδα κῶας ἱκέσθαι. 3.340. νῆα δʼ Ἀθηναίη Παλλὰς κάμεν, οὐ μάλα τοίην 3.341. οἷαί περ Κόλχοισι μετʼ ἀνδράσι νῆες ἔασιν 3.342. τάων αἰνοτάτης ἐπεκύρσαμεν. ἤλιθα γάρ μιν 3.343. λάβρον ὕδωρ πνοιή τε διέτμαγεν· ἡ δʼ ἐνὶ γόμφοις 3.344. ἴσχεται, ἢν καὶ πᾶσαι ἐπιβρίσωσιν ἄελλαι. 3.345. ἶσον δʼ ἐξ ἀνέμοιο θέει καὶ ὅτʼ ἀνέρες αὐτοὶ 3.346. νωλεμέως χείρεσσιν ἐπισπέρχωσιν ἐρετμοῖς. 3.347. τῇ δʼ ἐναγειράμενος Παναχαιίδος εἴ τι φέριστον 3.348. ἡρώων, τεὸν ἄστυ μετήλυθε, πόλλʼ ἐπαληθεὶς 3.349. ἄστεα καὶ πελάγη στυγερῆς ἁλός, εἴ οἱ ὀπάσσαις. 3.350. αὐτῷ δʼ ὥς κεν ἅδῃ, τὼς ἔσσεται· οὐ γὰρ ἱκάνει 3.351. χερσὶ βιησόμενος· μέμονεν δέ τοι ἄξια τίσειν 3.352. δωτίνης, ἀίων ἐμέθεν μέγα δυσμενέοντας 3.353. Σαυρομάτας, τοὺς σοῖσιν ὑπὸ σκήπτροισι δαμάσσει. 3.354. εἰ δὲ καὶ οὔνομα δῆθεν ἐπιθύεις γενεήν τε 3.355. ἴδμεναι, οἵτινές εἰσιν, ἕκαστά γε μυθησαίμην. 3.356. τόνδε μέν, οἷό περ οὕνεκʼ ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος ὧλλοι ἄγερθεν 3.357. κλείουσʼ Αἴσονος υἱὸν Ἰήσονα Κρηθεΐδαο. 3.358. εἰ δʼ αὐτοῦ Κρηθῆος ἐτήτυμόν ἐστι γενέθλης 3.359. οὕτω κεν γνωτὸς πατρώιος ἄμμι πέλοιτο. 3.360. ἄμφω γὰρ Κρηθεὺς Ἀθάμας τʼ ἔσαν Αἰόλου υἷες· 3.361. Φρίξος δʼ αὖτʼ Ἀθάμαντος ἔην πάις Αἰολίδαο. 3.362. τόνδε δʼ ἄρʼ, Ἠελίου γόνον ἔμμεναι εἴ τινʼ ἀκούεις 3.363. δέρκεαι Αὐγείην· Τελαμὼν δʼ ὅγε, κυδίστοιο 3.364. Αἰακοῦ ἐκγεγαώς· Ζεὺς δʼ Αἰακὸν αὐτὸς ἔτικτεν. 3.365. ὧς δὲ καὶ ὧλλοι πάντες, ὅσοι συνέπονται ἑταῖροι 3.366. ἀθανάτων υἷές τε καὶ υἱωνοὶ γεγάασιν.’ 3.367. τοῖα παρέννεπεν Ἄργος· ἄναξ δʼ ἐπεχώσατο μύθοις 3.368. εἰσαΐων· ὑψοῦ δὲ χόλῳ φρένες ἠερέθοντο. 3.369. φῆ δʼ ἐπαλαστήσας· μενέαινε δὲ παισὶ μάλιστα 3.370. Χαλκιόπης· τῶν γάρ σφε μετελθέμεν οὕνεκʼ ἐώλπει· 3.371. ἐκ δέ οἱ ὄμματʼ ἔλαμψεν ὑπʼ ὀφρύσιν ἱεμένοιο· 3.372. ‘οὐκ ἄφαρ ὀφθαλμῶν μοι ἀπόπροθι, λωβητῆρες 3.373. νεῖσθʼ αὐτοῖσι δόλοισι παλίσσυτοι ἔκτοθι γαίης 3.374. πρίν τινα λευγαλέον τε δέρος καὶ Φρίξον ἰδέσθαι; 3.375. αὐτίχʼ ὁμαρτήσαντες ἀφʼ Ἑλλάδος, οὐκ ἐπὶ κῶας 3.376. σκῆπτρα δὲ καὶ τιμὴν βασιληίδα δεῦρο νέεσθε. 3.378. ἦ τʼ ἂν ἀπὸ γλώσσας τε ταμὼν καὶ χεῖρε κεάσσας 3.379. ἀμφοτέρας, οἴοισιν ἐπιπροέηκα πόδεσσιν 3.380. ὥς κεν ἐρητύοισθε καὶ ὕστερον ὁρμηθῆναι 3.381. οἷα δὲ καὶ μακάρεσσιν ἐπεψεύσασθε θεοῖσιν.’ 3.382. φῆ ῥα χαλεψάμενος· μέγα δὲ φρένες Αἰακίδαο 3.383. νειόθεν οἰδαίνεσκον· ἐέλδετο δʼ ἔνδοθι θυμὸς 3.384. ἀντιβίην ὀλοὸν φάσθαι ἔπος· ἀλλʼ ἀπέρυκεν 3.385. Αἰσονίδης· πρὸ γὰρ αὐτὸς ἀμείψατο μειλιχίοισιν· 3.386. ‘Αἰήτη, σχέο μοι τῷδε στόλῳ. οὔτι γὰρ αὔτως 3.387. ἄστυ τεὸν καὶ δώμαθʼ ἱκάνομεν, ὥς που ἔολπας 3.388. οὐδὲ μὲν ἱέμενοι. τίς δʼ ἂν τόσον οἶδμα περῆσαι 3.389. τλαίη ἑκὼν ὀθνεῖον ἐπὶ κτέρας; ἀλλά με δαίμων 3.390. καὶ κρυερὴ βασιλῆος ἀτασθάλου ὦρσεν ἐφετμή. 3.391. δὸς χάριν ἀντομένοισι· σέθεν δʼ ἐγὼ Ἑλλάδι πάσῃ 3.392. θεσπεσιην οἴσω κληηδόνα· καὶ δέ τοι ἤδη 3.393. πρόφρονές εἰμεν ἄρηι θοὴν ἀποτῖσαι ἀμοιβήν 3.394. εἴτʼ οὖν Σαυρομάτας γε λιλαίεαι, εἴτε τινʼ ἄλλον 3.395. δῆμον σφωιτέροισιν ὑπὸ σκήπτροισι δαμάσσαι.’ 3.396. Ἴσκεν ὑποσσαίνων ἀγανῇ ὀπί· τοῖο δὲ θυμὸς 3.397. διχθαδίην πόρφυρεν ἐνὶ στήθεσσι μενοινήν 3.398. ἤ σφεας ὁρμηθεὶς αὐτοσχεδὸν ἐξεναρίζοι 3.399. ἦ ὅγε πειρήσαιτο βίης. τό οἱ εἴσατʼ ἄρειον 3.400. φραζομένῳ· καὶ δή μιν ὑποβλήδην προσέειπεν· 3.401. ‘ξεῖνε, τί κεν τὰ ἕκαστα διηνεκέως ἀγορεύοις; 3.402. εἰ γὰρ ἐτήτυμόν ἐστε θεῶν γένος, ἠὲ καὶ ἄλλως 3.403. οὐδὲν ἐμεῖο χέρηες ἐπʼ ὀθνείοισιν ἔβητε 3.404. δώσω τοι χρύσειον ἄγειν δέρος, αἴ κʼ ἐθέλῃσθα 3.405. πειρηθείς. ἐσθλοῖς γὰρ ἐπʼ ἀνδράσιν οὔτι μεγαίρω 3.406. ὡς αὐτοὶ μυθεῖσθε τὸν Ἑλλάδι κοιρανέοντα. 3.407. πεῖρα δέ τοι μένεός τε καὶ ἀλκῆς ἔσσετʼ ἄεθλος 3.408. τόν ῥʼ αὐτὸς περίειμι χεροῖν ὀλοόν περ ἐόντα. 3.409. δοιώ μοι πεδίον τὸ Ἀρήιον ἀμφινέμονται 3.410. ταύρω χαλκόποδε, στόματι φλόγα φυσιόωντες· 3.411. τοὺς ἐλάω ζεύξας στυφελὴν κατὰ νειὸν Ἄρηος 3.412. τετράγυον, τὴν αἶψα ταμὼν ἐπὶ τέλσον ἀρότρῳ 3.413. οὐ σπόρον ὁλκοῖσιν Δηοῦς ἐνιβᾴλλομαι ἀκτήν 3.414. ἀλλʼ ὄφιος δεινοῖο μεταλδήσκοντας ὀδόντας 3.415. ἀνδράσι τευχηστῇσι δέμας. τοὺς δʼ αὖθι δαΐζων 3.416. κείρω ἐμῷ ὑπὸ δουρὶ περισταδὸν ἀντιόωντας. 3.417. ἠέριος ζεύγνυμι βόας, καὶ δείελον ὥρην 3.418. παύομαι ἀμήτοιο. σύ δʼ, εἰ τάδε τοῖα τελέσσεις 3.419. αὐτῆμαρ τόδε κῶας ἀποίσεαι εἰς βασιλῆος· 3.420. πρὶν δέ κεν οὐ δοίην, μηδʼ ἔλπεο. δὴ γὰρ ἀεικὲς 3.421. ἄνδρʼ ἀγαθὸν γεγαῶτα κακωτέρῳ ἀνέρι εἶξαι.’ 3.422. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· ὁ δὲ σῖγα ποδῶν πάρος ὄμματα πήξας 3.423. ἧστʼ αὔτως ἄφθογγος, ἀμηχανέων κακότητι. 3.424. βουλὴν δʼ ἀμφὶ πολὺν στρώφα χρόνον, οὐδέ πῃ εἶχεν 3.425. θαρσαλέως ὑποδέχθαι, ἐπεὶ μέγα φαίνετο ἔργον· 3.426. ὀψε δʼ ἀμειβόμενος προσελέξατο κερδαλέοισιν· 3.427. ‘Αἰήτη, μάλα τοί με δίκῃ περιπολλὸν ἐέργεις. 3.428. τῶ καὶ ἐγὼ τὸν ἄεθλον ὑπερφίαλόν περ ἐόντα 3.429. τλήσομαι, εἰ καί μοι θανέειν μόρος. οὐ γὰρ ἔτʼ ἄλλο 3.430. ῥίγιον ἀνθρώποισι κακῆς ἐπικείσετʼ ἀνάγκης 3.431. ἥ με καὶ ἐνθάδε νεῖσθαι ἐπέχραεν ἐκ βασιλῆος.’ 3.432. ὧς φάτʼ ἀμηχανίῃ βεβολημένος· αὐτὰρ ὁ τόνγε 3.433. σμερδαλέοις ἐπέεσσι προσέννεπεν ἀσχαλόωντα· 3.434. ‘ἔρχεο νῦν μεθʼ ὅμιλον, ἐπεὶ μέμονάς γε πόνοιο· 3.435. εἰ δὲ σύγε ζυγὰ βουσὶν ὑποδδείσαις ἐπαεῖραι 3.436. ἠὲ καὶ οὐλομένου μεταχάσσεαι ἀμήτοιο 3.437. αὐτῷ κεν τὰ ἕκαστα μέλοιτό μοι, ὄφρα καὶ ἄλλος 3.438. ἀνὴρ ἐρρίγῃσιν ἀρείονα φῶτα μετελθεῖν.’ 3.453. προπρὸ δʼ ἄρʼ ὀφθαλμῶν ἔτι οἱ ἰνδάλλετο πάντα 3.454. αὐτός θʼ οἷος ἔην, οἵοισί τε φάρεσιν ἕστο 3.455. οἷά τʼ ἔειφʼ, ὥς θʼ ἕζετʼ ἐπὶ θρόνου, ὥς τε θύραζε 3.456. ἤιεν· οὐδέ τινʼ ἄλλον ὀίσσατο πορφύρουσα 3.457. ἔμμεναι ἀνέρα τοῖον· ἐν οὔασι δʼ αἰὲν ὀρώρει 3.458. αὐδή τε μῦθοί τε μελίφρονες, οὓς ἀγόρευσεν. 3.502. ὧς ἄρʼ ἔφη· πάντεσσι δʼ ἀνήνυτος εἴσατʼ ἄεθλος 3.503. δὴν δʼ ἄνεῳ καὶ ἄναυδοι ἐς ἀλλήλους ὁρόωντο 3.504. ἄτῃ ἀμηχανίῃ τε κατηφέες· ὀψὲ δὲ Πηλεὺς 3.505. θαρσαλέως μετὰ πᾶσιν ἀριστήεσσιν ἔειπεν· 3.506. ‘ὥρη μητιάασθαι ὅ κʼ ἔρξομεν. οὐ μὲν ἔολπα 3.507. βουλῆς εἶναι ὄνειαρ, ὅσον τʼ ἐπὶ κάρτεϊ χειρῶν. 3.508. εἰ μέν νυν τύνη ζεῦξαι βόας Αἰήταο 3.509. ἥρως Αἰσονίδη, φρονέεις, μέμονάς τε πόνοιο 3.510. ἦ τʼ ἂν ὑποσχεσίην πεφυλαγμένος ἐντύναιο· 3.511. εἰ δʼ οὔ τοι μάλα θυμὸς ἑῇ ἐπὶ πάγχυ πέποιθεν 3.512. ἠνορέῃ, μήτʼ αὐτὸς ἐπείγεο, μήτε τινʼ ἄλλον 3.513. τῶνδʼ ἀνδρῶν πάπταινε παρήμενος. οὐ γὰρ ἔγωγε 3.514. σχήσομʼ, ἐπεὶ θάνατός γε τὸ κύντατον ἔσσεται ἄλγος.’ 3.540. ὧς φάτο· τοῖσι δὲ σῆμα θεοὶ δόσαν εὐμενέοντες. 3.541. τρηρὼν μὲν φεύγουσα βίην κίρκοιο πελειὰς 3.542. ὑψόθεν Αἰσονίδεω πεφοβημένη ἔμπεσε κόλποις· 3.543. κίρκος δʼ ἀφλάστῳ περικάππεσεν. ὦκα δὲ Μόψος 3.544. τοῖον ἔπος μετὰ πᾶσι θεοπροπέων ἀγόρευσεν· 3.580. ἄνδρα τόν, ὅς ῥʼ ὑπέδεκτο βαρὺν καμέεσθαι ἄεθλον 3.581. δρυμὸν ἀναρρήξας λασίης καθύπερθε· κολώνης 3.582. αὔτανδρον φλέξειν δόρυ νήιον, ὄφρʼ ἀλεγεινὴν 3.583. ὕβριν ἀποφλύξωσιν ὑπέρβια μηχανόωντες. 3.584. οὐδὲ γὰρ Αἰολίδην Φρίξον μάλα περ χατέοντα 3.585. δέχθαι ἐνὶ μεγάροισιν ἐφέστιον, ὃς περὶ πάντων 3.586. ξείνων μελιχίῃ τε θεουδείῃ τʼ ἐκέκαστο 3.587. εἰ μή οἱ Ζεὺς αὐτὸς ἀπʼ οὐρανοῦ ἄγγελον ἧκεν 3.588. Ἑρμείαν, ὥς κεν προσκηδέος ἀντιάσειεν· 3.594. νόσφι δὲ οἷ αὐτῷ φάτʼ ἐοικότα μείλια τίσειν 3.595. υἱῆας Φρίξοιο, κακορρέκτῃσιν ὀπηδοὺς 3.596. ἀνδράσι νοστήσαντας ὁμιλαδόν, ὄφρα ἑ τιμῆς 3.597. καὶ σκήπτρων ἐλάσειαν ἀκηδέες· ὥς ποτε βάξιν 3.598. λευγαλέην οὗ πατρὸς ἐπέκλυεν Ἠελίοιο 3.599. χρειώ μιν πυκινόν τε δόλον βουλάς τε γενέθλης 3.600. σφωιτέρης ἄτην τε πολύτροπον ἐξαλέασθαι· 3.915. ἠερίην Ἑκάτης ἱερὸν μετὰ νηὸν ἰοῦσαν 3.916. ἦγε διὲκ πεδίου· ἅμα δέ σφισιν εἵπετο Μόψος 3.917. Ἀμπυκίδης, ἐσθλὸς μὲν ἐπιπροφανέντας ἐνισπεῖν 3.918. οἰωνούς, ἐσθλὸς δὲ σὺν εὖ φράσσασθαι ἰοῦσιν. 3.919. ἔνθʼ οὔπω τις τοῖος ἐπὶ προτέρων γένετʼ ἀνδρῶν 3.920. οὔθʼ ὅσοι ἐξ αὐτοῖο Διὸς γένος, οὔθʼ ὅσοι ἄλλων 3.921. ἀθανάτων ἥρωες ἀφʼ αἵματος ἐβλάστησαν 3.922. οἷον Ἰήσονα θῆκε Διὸς δάμαρ ἤματι κείνῳ 3.923. ἠμὲν ἐσάντα ἰδεῖν, ἠδὲ προτιμυθήσασθαι. 3.924. τὸν καὶ παπταίνοντες ἐθάμβεον αὐτοὶ ἑταῖροι 3.925. λαμπόμενον χαρίτεσσιν· ἐγήθησεν δὲ κελεύθῳ 3.926. Ἀμπυκίδης, ἤδη που ὀισσάμενος τὰ ἕκαστα. 3.927. ἔστι δέ τις πεδίοιο κατὰ στίβον ἐγγύθι νηοῦ 3.928. αἴγειρος φύλλοισιν ἀπειρεσίοις κομόωσα 3.929. τῇ θαμὰ δὴ λακέρυζαι ἐπηυλίζοντο κορῶναι. 3.930. τάων τις μεσσηγὺς ἀνὰ πτερὰ κινήσασα 3.931. ὑψοῦ ἐπʼ ἀκρεμόνων Ἥρης ἠνίπαπε βουλάς· 3.932. ‘Ἀκλειὴς ὅδε μάντις, ὃς οὐδʼ ὅσα παῖδες ἴσασιν 3.933. οἶδε νόῳ φράσσασθαι, ὁθούνεκεν οὔτε τι λαρὸν 3.934. οὔτʼ ἐρατὸν κούρη κεν ἔπος προτιμυθήσαιτο 3.935. ἠιθέῳ, εὖτʼ ἄν σφιν ἐπήλυδες ἄλλοι ἕπωνται. 3.936. ἔρροις, ὦ κακόμαντι, κακοφραδές· οὔτε σε Κύπρις 3.937. οὔτʼ ἀγανοὶ φιλέοντες ἐπιπνείουσιν Ἔρωτες.’ 3.938. Ἴσκεν ἀτεμβομένη· μείδησε δὲ Μόψος ἀκούσας 3.939. ὀμφὴν οἰωνοῖο θεήλατον, ὧδέ τʼ ἔειπεν· 3.940. ‘τύνη μὲν νηόνδε θεᾶς ἴθι, τῷ ἔνι κούρην 3.941. δήεις, Αἰσονίδη· μάλα δʼ ἠπίῃ ἀντιβολήσεις 3.942. Κύπριδος ἐννεσίῃς, ἥ τοι συνέριθος ἀέθλων 3.943. ἔσσεται, ὡς δὴ καὶ πρὶν Ἀγηνορίδης φάτο Φινεύς. 3.944. νῶι δʼ, ἐγὼν Ἄργος τε, δεδεγμένοι, εὖτʼ ἂν ἵκηαι 3.945. τῷδʼ αὐτῷ ἐνὶ χώρῳ ἀπεσσόμεθʼ· οἰόθι δʼ αὐτὸς 3.946. λίσσεό μιν πυκινοῖσι παρατροπέων ἐπέεσσιν.’ 3.1105. ‘Ἑλλάδι που τάδε καλά, συνημοσύνας ἀλεγύνειν. 3.1106. Αἰήτης δʼ οὐ τοῖος ἐν ἀνδράσιν, οἷον ἔειπας 3.1107. Μίνω Πασιφάης πόσιν ἔμμεναι· οὐδʼ Ἀριάδνῃ 3.1194. ἔντυον ἥρωες παρὰ πείσμασιν. αὐτὰρ Ἰήσων 3.1195. αὐτίκʼ ἐπεί ῥʼ Ἑλίκης εὐφεγγέος ἀστέρες Ἄρκτου 3.1196. ἔκλιθεν, οὐρανόθεν δὲ πανεύκηλος γένετʼ αἰθήρ 3.1197. βῆ ῥʼ ἐς ἐρημαίην, κλωπήιος ἠύτε τις φώρ 3.1198. σὺν πᾶσιν χρήεσσι· πρὸ γάρ τʼ ἀλέγυνεν ἕκαστα 3.1199. ἠμάτιος· θῆλυν μὲν ὄιν, γάλα τʼ ἔκτοθι ποίμνης 3.1200. Ἄργος ἰὼν ἤνεικε· τὰ δʼ ἐξ αὐτῆς ἕλε νηός. 3.1201. ἀλλʼ ὅτε δὴ ἴδε χῶρον, ὅτις πάτου ἔκτοθεν ἦεν 3.1202. ἀνθρώπων, καθαρῇσιν ὑπεύδιος εἱαμενῇσιν 3.1203. ἔνθʼ ἤτοι πάμπρωτα λοέσσατο μὲν ποταμοῖο 3.1204. εὐαγέως θείοιο τέρεν δέμας· ἀμφὶ δὲ φᾶρος 3.1205. ἕσσατο κυάνεον, τό ῥά οἱ πάρος ἐγγυάλιξεν 3.1206. Λημνιὰς Ὑψιπύλη, ἀδινῆς μνημήιον εὐνῆς. 3.1207. πήχυιον δʼ ἄρʼ ἔπειτα πέδῳ ἔνι βόθρον ὀρύξας 3.1208. νήησε σχίζας, ἐπὶ δʼ ἀρνειοῦ τάμε λαιμόν 3.1209. αὐτόν τʼ εὖ καθύπερθε τανύσσατο· δαῖε δὲ φιτρους 3.1210. πῦρ ὑπένερθεν ἱείς, ἐπὶ δὲ μιγάδας χέε λοιβάς 3.1211. Βριμὼ κικλήσκων Ἑκάτην ἐπαρωγὸν ἀέθλων. 3.1212. καί ῥʼ ὁ μὲν ἀγκαλέσας πάλιν ἔστιχεν· ἡ δʼ ἀίουσα 3.1213. κευθμῶν ἐξ ὑπάτων δεινὴ θεὸς ἀντεβόλησεν 3.1214. ἱροῖς Αἰσονίδαο· πέριξ δέ μιν ἐστεφάνωντο 3.1215. σμερδαλέοι δρυΐνοισι μετὰ πτόρθοισι δράκοντες. 3.1216. στράπτε δʼ ἀπειρέσιον δαΐδων σέλας· ἀμφὶ δὲ τήνγε 3.1217. ὀξείῃ ὑλακῇ χθόνιοι κύνες ἐφθέγγοντο. 3.1218. πίσεα δʼ ἔτρεμε πάντα κατὰ στίβον· αἱ δʼ ὀλόλυξαν 3.1219. νύμφαι ἑλειονόμοι ποταμηίδες, αἳ περὶ κείνην 3.1220. Φάσιδος εἱαμενὴν Ἀμαραντίου εἱλίσσονται. 3.1221. Αἰσονίδην δʼ ἤτοι μὲν ἕλεν δέος, ἀλλά μιν οὐδʼ ὧς 3.1222. ἐντροπαλιζόμενον πόδες ἔκφερον, ὄφρʼ ἑτάροισιν 3.1223. μίκτο κιών· ἤδη δὲ φόως νιφόεντος ὕπερθεν 3.1224. Καυκάσου ἠριγενὴς Ἠὼς βάλεν ἀντέλλουσα. 3.1248. ἠδὲ δόρυ βριαρόν, περὶ δὲ ξίφος· ἀμφὶ δʼ ἑταῖροι 3.1249. πείρησαν τευχέων βεβιημένοι, οὐδʼ ἐδύναντο 3.1250. κεῖνο δόρυ γνάμψαι τυτθόν γέ περ, ἀλλὰ μάλʼ αὔτως 3.1251. ἀαγὲς κρατερῇσιν ἐνεσκλήκει παλάμῃσιν. 3.1252. αὐτὰρ ὁ τοῖς ἄμοτον κοτέων Ἀφαρήιος Ἴδας 3.1253. κόψε παρʼ οὐρίαχον μεγάλῳ ξίφει· ἆλτο δʼ ἀκωκὴ 3.1254. ῥαιστὴρ ἄκμονος ὥστε, παλιντυπές· οἱ δʼ ὁμάδησαν 3.1255. γηθόσυνοι ἥρωες ἐπʼ ἐλπωρῇσιν ἀέθλου. 3.1268. καὶ τότʼ ἔπειτʼ οὐ δηρὸν ἔτι σχήσεσθαι ἀέθλων 3.1269. μέλλον· ἀτὰρ κληῖσιν ἐπισχερὼ ἱδρυνθέντες 3.1270. ῥίμφα μάλʼ ἐς πεδίον τὸ Ἀρήιον ἠπείγοντο. 3.1271. τόσσον δὲ προτέρω πέλεν ἄστεος ἀντιπέρηθεν 3.1272. ὅσσον τʼ ἐκ βαλβῖδος ἐπήβολος ἅρματι νύσσα 3.1273. γίγνεται, ὁππότʼ ἄεθλα καταφθιμένοιο ἄνακτος 3.1274. κηδεμόνες πεζοῖσι καὶ ἱππήεσσι τίθενται. 3.1275. τέτμον δʼ Αἰήτην τε καὶ ἄλλων ἔθνεα Κόλχων 3.1276. τοὺς μὲν Καυκασίοισιν ἐφεσταότας σκοπέλοισιν 3.1277. τὸν δʼ αὐτοῦ παρὰ χεῖλος ἑλισσόμενον ποταμοῖο. 3.1347. γηγενέων ἀνδρῶν ἴδεν αὔλακας. ἀμφὶ δʼ ἑταῖροι 3.1348. θάρσυνον μύθοισιν. ὁ δʼ ἐκ ποταμοῖο ῥοάων 4.11. τῇ δʼ ἀλεγεινότατον κραδίῃ φόβον ἔμβαλεν Ἥρη· 4.15. ληθέμεν, αἶψα δὲ πᾶσαν ἀναπλήσειν κακότητα. 4.75. τρὶς μὲν ἀνήυσεν, τρὶς δʼ ὀτρύνοντος ὁμίλου 4.76. Φρόντις ἀμοιβήδην ἀντίαχεν· οἱ δʼ ἄρα τείως 4.77. ἥρωες μετὰ τήνγε θοοῖς ἐλάασκον ἐρετμοῖς. 4.78. οὔπω πείσματα νηὸς ἐπʼ ἠπείροιο περαίης 4.79. βάλλον, ὁ δὲ κραιπνοὺς χέρσῳ πόδας ἧκεν Ἰήσων 4.80. ὑψοῦ ἀπʼ ἰκριόφιν· μετὰ δὲ Φρόντις τε καὶ Ἄργος 4.81. υἷε δύω Φρίξου, χαμάδις θόρον· ἡ δʼ ἄρα τούσγε 4.212. ἤδη δʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι πᾶσί τε Κόλχοις 4.213. Μηδείης περίπυστος ἔρως καὶ ἔργʼ ἐτέτυκτο. 4.214. ἐς δʼ ἀγορὴν ἀγέροντʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσιν· ὅσσα δέ πόντου 4.215. κύματα χειμερίοιο κορύσσεται ἐξ ἀνέμοιο 4.216. ἢ ὅσα φύλλα χαμᾶζε περικλαδέος πέσεν ὕλης 4.217. φυλλοχόῳ ἐνὶ μηνί--τίς ἂν τάδε τεκμήραιτο; 4.218. ὧς οἱ ἀπειρέσιοι ποταμοῦ παρεμέτρεον ὄχθας 4.219. κλαγγῇ μαιμώοντες· ὁ δʼ εὐτύκτῳ ἐνὶ δίφρῳ 4.220. Αἰήτης ἵπποισι μετέπρεπεν, οὕς οἱ ὄπασσεν 4.221. ἠέλιος πνοιῇσιν ἐειδομένους ἀνέμοιο 4.222. σκαιῇ μέν ῥ̓ ἐνὶ χειρὶ σάκος δινωτὸν ἀείρων 4.223. τῇ δʼ ἑτέρῃ πεύκην περιμήκεα· πὰρ δέ οἱ ἔγχος 4.224. ἀντικρὺ τετάνυστο πελώριον. ἡνία δʼ ἵππων 4.225. γέντο χεροῖν Ἄψυρτος. υπεκπρὸ δὲ πόντον ἔταμνεν 4.226. νηῦς ἤδη κρατεροῖσιν ἐπειγομένη ἐρέτῃσιν 4.227. καὶ μεγάλου ποταμοῖο καταβλώσκοντι ῥεέθρῳ. 4.228. αὐτὰρ ἄναξ ἄτῃ πολυπήμονι χεῖρας ἀείρας 4.229. ἠέλιον καὶ Ζῆνα κακῶν ἐπιμάρτυρας ἔργων 4.230. κέκλετο· δεινὰ δὲ παντὶ παρασχεδὸν ἤπυε λαῷ 4.231. εἰ μή οἱ κούρην αὐτάγρετον, ἢ ἀνὰ γαῖαν 4.232. ἢ πλωτῆς εὑρόντες ἔτʼ εἰν ἁλὸς οἴδματι νῆα 4.233. ἄξουσιν, καὶ θυμὸν ἐνιπλήσει μενεαίνων 4.234. τίσασθαι τάδε πάντα, δαήσονται κεφαλῇσιν 4.235. πάντα χόλον καὶ πᾶσαν ἑὴν ὑποδέγμενοι ἄτην. 4.338. ἔνθα κε λευγαλέῃ Μινύαι τότε δηιοτῆτι 4.339. παυρότεροι πλεόνεσσιν ὑπείκαθον· ἀλλὰ πάροιθεν 4.340. συνθεσίην, μέγα νεῖκος ἀλευάμενοι, ἐτάμοντο 4.341. κῶας μὲν χρύσειον, ἐπεί σφισιν αὐτὸς ὑπέστη 4.342. Αἰήτης, εἰ κεῖνοι ἀναπλήσειαν ἀέθλους 4.343. ἔμπεδον εὐδικίῃ σφέας ἑξέμεν, εἴτε δόλοισιν 4.344. εἴτε καὶ ἀμφαδίην αὔτως ἀέκοντος ἀπηύρων· 4.345. αὐτὰρ Μήδειάν γε--τὸ γὰρ πέλεν ἀμφήριστον-- 4.346. παρθέσθαι κούρῃ Λητωίδι νόσφιν ὁμίλου 4.347. εἰσόκε τις δικάσῃσι θεμιστούχων βασιλήων 4.348. εἴτε μιν εἰς πατρὸς χρειὼ δόμον αὖτις ἱκάνειν 4.349. εἴτε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἀριστήεσσιν ἕπεσθαι. 4.350. ἔνθα δʼ ἐπεὶ τὰ ἕκαστα νόῳ πεμπάσσατο κούρη 4.351. δή ῥά μιν ὀξεῖαι κραδίην ἐλέλιξαν ἀνῖαι 4.352. νωλεμές· αἶψα δὲ νόσφιν Ἰήσονα μοῦνον ἑταίρων 4.353. ἐκπροκαλεσσαμένη ἄγεν ἄλλυδις, ὄφρʼ ἐλίασθεν 4.354. πολλὸν ἑκάς, στονόεντα δʼ ἐνωπαδὶς ἔκφατο μῦθον· 4.355. ‘Αἰσονίδη, τίνα τήνδε συναρτύνασθε μενοινὴν 4.356. ἀμφʼ ἐμοί; ἦέ σε πάγχυ λαθιφροσύναις ἐνέηκαν 4.357. ἀγλαΐαι, τῶν δʼ οὔτι μετατρέπῃ, ὅσσʼ ἀγόρευες 4.358. χρειοῖ ἐνισχόμενος; ποῦ τοι Διὸς Ἱκεσίοιο 4.359. ὅρκια, ποῦ δὲ μελιχραὶ ὑποσχεσίαι βεβάασιν; 4.360. ᾗς ἐγὼ οὐ κατὰ κόσμον ἀναιδήτῳ ἰότητι 4.361. πάτρην τε κλέα τε μεγάρων αὐτούς τε τοκῆας 4.362. νοσφισάμην, τά μοι ἦεν ὑπέρτατα· τηλόθι δʼ οἴη 4.363. λυγρῇσιν κατὰ πόντον ἅμʼ ἀλκυόνεσσι φορεῦμαι 4.364. σῶν ἕνεκεν καμάτων, ἵνα μοι σόος ἀμφί τε βουσὶν 4.365. ἀμφί τε γηγενέεσσιν ἀναπλήσειας ἀέθλους. 4.366. ὕστατον αὖ καὶ κῶας, ἐπεί τʼ ἐπαϊστὸν ἐτύχθη 4.367. εἷλες ἐμῇ ματίῃ· κατὰ δʼ οὐλοὸν αἶσχος ἔχευα 4.368. θηλυτέραις. τῶ φημὶ τεὴ κούρη τε δάμαρ τε 4.369. αὐτοκασιγνήτη τε μεθʼ Ἑλλάδα γαῖαν ἕπεσθαι. 4.370. πάντῃ νυν πρόφρων ὑπερίστασο, μηδέ με μούνην 4.371. σεῖο λίπῃς ἀπάνευθεν, ἐποιχόμενος βασιλῆας. 4.372. ἀλλʼ αὔτως εἴρυσο· δίκη δέ τοι ἔμπεδος ἔστω 4.373. καὶ θέμις, ἣν ἄμφω συναρέσσαμεν· ἢ σύγʼ ἔπειτα 4.374. φασγάνῳ αὐτίκα τόνδε μέσον διὰ λαιμὸν ἀμῆσαι 4.375. ὄφρʼ ἐπίηρα φέρωμαι ἐοικότα μαργοσύνῃσιν. 4.376. σχετλίη, εἴ κεν δή με κασιγνήτοιο δικάσσῃ 4.377. ἔμμεναι οὗτος ἄναξ, τῷ ἐπίσχετε τάσδʼ ἀλεγεινὰς 4.378. ἄμφω συνθεσίας. πῶς ἵξομαι ὄμματα πατρός; 4.379. ἦ μάλʼ ἐυκλειής; τίνα δʼ οὐ τίσιν, ἠὲ βαρεῖαν 4.380. ἄτην οὐ σμυγερῶς δεινῶν ὕπερ, οἷα ἔοργα 4.381. ὀτλήσω; σὺ δέ κεν θυμηδέα νόστον ἕλοιο; 4.382. μὴ τόγε παμβασίλεια Διὸς τελέσειεν ἄκοιτις 4.383. ᾗ ἐπικυδιάεις. μνήσαιο δέ καί ποτʼ ἐμεῖο 4.384. στρευγόμενος καμάτοισι· δέρος δέ τοι ἶσον ὀνείροις 4.385. οἴχοιτʼ εἰς ἔρεβος μεταμώνιον. ἐκ δέ σε πάτρης 4.386. αὐτίκʼ ἐμαί σʼ ἐλάσειαν Ἐρινύες· οἷα καὶ αὐτὴ 4.387. σῇ πάθον ἀτροπίῃ. τὰ μὲν οὐ θέμις ἀκράαντα 4.388. ἐν γαίῃ πεσέειν. μάλα γὰρ μέγαν ἤλιτες ὅρκον 4.389. νηλεές· ἀλλʼ οὔ θήν μοι ἐπιλλίζοντες ὀπίσσω 4.390. δὴν ἔσσεσθʼ εὔκηλοι ἕκητί γε συνθεσιάων.’ 4.391. ὧς φάτʼ ἀναζείουσα βαρὺν χόλον· ἵετο δʼ ἥγε 4.392. νῆα καταφλέξαι, διά τʼ ἔμπεδα πάντα κεάσσαι 4.393. ἐν δὲ πεσεῖν αὐτὴ μαλερῷ πυρί. τοῖα δʼ Ἰήσων 4.1051. αὐτῷ τʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι· νῦν δʼ ἐλάθεσθε 4.1209. δὴ τότε μιν βασιλῆος ἑοῦ τρομέοντας ἐνιπὰς
5. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.297-1.304, 1.495-1.623, 1.701-1.708, 7.37 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.297. or mourns with grief untold the untimely doom 1.299. After these things were past, exalted Jove 1.300. from his ethereal sky surveying clear 1.301. the seas all winged with sails, lands widely spread 1.302. and nations populous from shore to shore 1.303. paused on the peak of heaven, and fixed his gaze 1.304. on Libya . But while he anxious mused 1.495. and for her journey's aid, he whispered where 1.496. his buried treasure lay, a weight unknown 1.497. of silver and of gold. Thus onward urged 1.498. Dido, assembling her few trusted friends 1.499. prepared her flight. There rallied to her cause 1.500. all who did hate and scorn the tyrant king 1.501. or feared his cruelty. They seized his ships 1.502. which haply rode at anchor in the bay 1.503. and loaded them with gold; the hoarded wealth 1.504. of vile and covetous Pygmalion 1.505. they took to sea. A woman wrought this deed. 1.506. Then came they to these lands where now thine eyes 1.507. behold yon walls and yonder citadel 1.508. of newly rising Carthage . For a price 1.509. they measured round so much of Afric soil 1.510. as one bull's hide encircles, and the spot 1.511. received its name, the Byrsa. But, I pray 1.512. what men are ye? from what far land arrived 1.513. and whither going?” When she questioned thus 1.514. her son, with sighs that rose from his heart's depths 1.516. “Divine one, if I tell 1.517. my woes and burdens all, and thou could'st pause 1.518. to heed the tale, first would the vesper star 1.519. th' Olympian portals close, and bid the day 1.520. in slumber lie. of ancient Troy are we— 1.521. if aught of Troy thou knowest! As we roved 1.522. from sea to sea, the hazard of the storm 1.523. cast us up hither on this Libyan coast. 1.524. I am Aeneas, faithful evermore 1.525. to Heaven's command; and in my ships I bear 1.526. my gods ancestral, which I snatched away 1.527. from peril of the foe. My fame is known 1.528. above the stars. I travel on in quest 1.529. of Italy, my true home-land, and I 1.530. from Jove himself may trace my birth divine. 1.531. With twice ten ships upon the Phryglan main 1.532. I launched away. My mother from the skies 1.533. gave guidance, and I wrought what Fate ordained. 1.534. Yet now scarce seven shattered ships survive 1.535. the shock of wind and wave; and I myself 1.536. friendless, bereft, am wandering up and down 1.537. this Libyan wilderness! Behold me here 1.538. from Europe and from Asia exiled still!” 1.539. But Venus could not let him longer plain 1.541. “Whoe'er thou art 1.542. I deem that not unblest of heavenly powers 1.543. with vital breath still thine, thou comest hither 1.544. unto our Tyrian town. Go steadfast on 1.545. and to the royal threshold make thy way! 1.546. I bring thee tidings that thy comrades all 1.547. are safe at land; and all thy ships, conveyed 1.548. by favoring breezes, safe at anchor lie; 1.549. or else in vain my parents gave me skill 1.550. to read the skies. Look up at yonder swans! 1.551. A flock of twelve, whose gayly fluttering file 1.552. erst scattered by Jove's eagle swooping down 1.553. from his ethereal haunt, now form anew 1.554. their long-drawn line, and make a landing-place 1.555. or, hovering over, scan some chosen ground 1.556. or soaring high, with whir of happy wings 1.557. re-circle heaven in triumphant song: 1.558. likewise, I tell thee, thy Iost mariners 1.559. are landed, or fly landward at full sail. 1.561. She ceased and turned away. A roseate beam 1.562. from her bright shoulder glowed; th' ambrosial hair 1.563. breathed more than mortal sweetness, while her robes 1.564. fell rippling to her feet. Each step revealed 1.565. the veritable goddess. Now he knew 1.566. that vision was his mother, and his words 1.567. pursued the fading phantom as it fled: 1.568. “Why is thy son deluded o'er and o'er 1.569. with mocking dreams,—another cruel god? 1.570. Hast thou no hand-clasp true, nor interchange 1.571. of words unfeigned betwixt this heart and thine?” 1.572. Such word of blame he spoke, and took his way 1.573. toward the city's rampart. Venus then 1.574. o'erveiled them as they moved in darkened air,— 1.575. a liquid mantle of thick cloud divine,— 1.576. that viewless they might pass, nor would any 1.577. obstruct, delay, or question why they came. 1.578. To Paphos then she soared, her Ioved abode 1.579. where stands her temple, at whose hundred shrines 1.580. garlands of myrtle and fresh roses breathe 1.582. Meanwhile the wanderers swiftly journey on 1.583. along the clear-marked road, and soon they climb 1.584. the brow of a high hill, which close in view 1.585. o'er-towers the city's crown. The vast exploit 1.586. where lately rose but Afric cabins rude 1.587. Aeneas wondered at: the smooth, wide ways; 1.588. the bastioned gates; the uproar of the throng. 1.589. The Tyrians toil unwearied; some up-raise 1.590. a wall or citadel, from far below 1.591. lifting the ponderous stone; or with due care 1.592. choose where to build, and close the space around 1.593. with sacred furrow; in their gathering-place 1.594. the people for just governors, just laws 1.595. and for their reverend senate shout acclaim. 1.596. Some clear the harbor mouth; some deeply lay 1.597. the base of a great theatre, and carve out 1.598. proud columns from the mountain, to adorn 1.599. their rising stage with lofty ornament. 1.600. o busy bees above a field of flowers 1.601. in early summer amid sunbeams toil 1.602. leading abroad their nation's youthful brood; 1.603. or with the flowing honey storing close 1.604. the pliant cells, until they quite run o'er 1.605. with nectared sweet; while from the entering swarm 1.606. they take their little loads; or lined for war 1.607. rout the dull drones, and chase them from the hive; 1.608. brisk is the task, and all the honeyed air 1.609. breathes odors of wild thyme. “How blest of Heaven. 1.610. These men that see their promised ramparts rise!” 1.611. Aeneas sighed; and swift his glances moved 1.612. from tower to tower; then on his way he fared 1.613. veiled in the wonder-cloud, whence all unseen 1.614. of human eyes,—O strange the tale and true!— 1.616. Deep in the city's heart there was a grove 1.617. of beauteous shade, where once the Tyrians 1.618. cast here by stormful waves, delved out of earth 1.619. that portent which Queen Juno bade them find,— 1.620. the head of a proud horse,—that ages long 1.621. their boast might be wealth, luxury and war. 1.622. Upon this spot Sidonian Dido raised 1.623. a spacious fane to Juno, which became 1.701. emerging tallest of her beauteous train; 1.702. while joy unutterable thrills the breast 1.703. of fond Latona: Dido not less fair 1.704. amid her subjects passed, and not less bright 1.705. her glow of gracious joy, while she approved 1.706. her future kingdom's pomp and vast emprise. 1.707. Then at the sacred portal and beneath 1.708. the temple's vaulted dome she took her place 7.37. Then, gazing from the deep, Aeneas saw
6. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.562-1.563, 2.647, 3.517-3.525, 3.545-3.564, 3.567, 4.327, 5.1-5.62, 5.65-5.66, 5.68-5.69, 5.549-5.560, 5.562, 5.572, 5.581-5.606, 5.614, 6.736, 7.26-7.27, 7.32-7.100, 7.593, 7.614-7.615, 8.385-8.407 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
absyrtus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
achilles de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
acropolis, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
aeetes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
aeneas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
agamemnon de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
aietes Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119, 173, 200
alcinous Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
amasis Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
amestris Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
amycus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
apollonius of rhodes, on medea Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
apollonius rhodius, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
apollonius rhodius, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
apollonius rhodius de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
apsyrtus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
argo, abandonment of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91
argos, son of phrixus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
argus, builder of the argo Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
argus (argonaut) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
artaynte Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
augeas Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91
cambyses Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
carthaginians, in the aeneid Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
carthaginians, portrait of Giusti, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 119
castor Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91
catalogue of argonauts Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
colchis, colchians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119, 173, 200
colchis Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
cyclops, cyclopes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119, 200
darius Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
dido Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
drepane Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
egypt, egyptians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
emotions, anger/rage de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
ethnography Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
europe Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
focalization, embedded (or secondary) de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
golden fleece Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
greece Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
hellas Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119
hera Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
hera (see also juno) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
idas de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
idmon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
iliad, homers Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
intertextuality, allusion de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
intertextuality de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
jason Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
masistes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
medea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90, 92; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227; Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119, 200
minos Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119
modello-esemplare, herodotus as Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
monarchy Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 200
mopsus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
mysia Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
nausicaa Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
nomoi Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119
non-greeks' Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
odysseus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119
odyssey, homers Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119
orpheus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
peleus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90
persia, persians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173, 200
pharsalus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
phrixus, sons of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 90, 91
phrixus Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 119, 200
pieria Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
pollux Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91
pompey Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
silence Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
simile de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
speech, collective Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
speech de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
telamon Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 91; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227; de Bakker, van den Berg, and Klooster, Emotions and Narrative in Ancient Literature and Beyond (2022) 480
thrace, thracians Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
tiphys Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
troy, trojans Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173
turnus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 227
valerius flaccus, collective speech in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
valerius flaccus, lament in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89
valerius flaccus, silence in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 89, 90, 91, 92
xerxes Morrison, Apollonius Rhodius, Herodotus and Historiography (2020) 173