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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



1026
Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 3.4.3


Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας.But Zeus loved Semele and bedded with her unknown to Hera. Now Zeus had agreed to do for her whatever she asked, and deceived by Hera she asked that he would come to her as he came when he was wooing Hera. Unable to refuse, Zeus came to her bridal chamber in a chariot, with lightnings and thunderings, and launched a thunderbolt. But Semele expired of fright, and Zeus, snatching the sixth-month abortive child from the fire, sewed it in his thigh. On the death of Semele the other daughters of Cadmus spread a report that Semele had bedded with a mortal man, and had falsely accused Zeus, and that therefore she had been blasted by thunder. But at the proper time Zeus undid the stitches and gave birth to Dionysus, and entrusted him to Hermes. And he conveyed him to Ino and Athamas, and persuaded them to rear him as a girl. But Hera indignantly drove them mad, and Athamas hunted his elder son Learchus as a deer and killed him, and Ino threw Melicertes into a boiling cauldron, then carrying it with the dead child she sprang into the deep. And she herself is called Leucothea, and the boy is called Palaemon, such being the names they get from sailors; for they succour storm-tossed mariners. And the Isthmian games were instituted by Sisyphus in honor of Melicertes. But Zeus eluded the wrath of Hera by turning Dionysus into a kid, and Hermes took him and brought him to the nymphs who dwelt at Nysa in Asia, whom Zeus afterwards changed into stars and named them the Hyades.


Σεμέλης δὲ Ζεὺς ἐρασθεὶς Ἥρας κρύφα συνευνάζεται. ἡ δὲ ἐξαπατηθεῖσα ὑπὸ Ἥρας, κατανεύσαντος αὐτῇ Διὸς πᾶν τὸ αἰτηθὲν ποιήσειν, αἰτεῖται τοιοῦτον αὐτὸν ἐλθεῖν οἷος ἦλθε μνηστευόμενος Ἥραν. Ζεὺς δὲ μὴ δυνάμενος ἀνανεῦσαι παραγίνεται εἰς τὸν θάλαμον αὐτῆς ἐφʼ ἅρματος ἀστραπαῖς ὁμοῦ καὶ βρονταῖς, καὶ κεραυνὸν ἵησιν. Σεμέλης δὲ διὰ τὸν φόβον ἐκλιπούσης, ἑξαμηνιαῖον τὸ βρέφος ἐξαμβλωθὲν ἐκ τοῦ πυρὸς ἁρπάσας ἐνέρραψε τῷ μηρῷ. ἀποθανούσης δὲ Σεμέλης, αἱ λοιπαὶ Κάδμου θυγατέρες διήνεγκαν λόγον, συνηυνῆσθαι θνητῷ τινι Σεμέλην καὶ καταψεύσασθαι Διός, καὶ ὅτι 1 -- διὰ τοῦτο ἐκεραυνώθη. κατὰ δὲ τὸν χρόνον τὸν καθήκοντα Διόνυσον γεννᾷ Ζεὺς λύσας τὰ ῥάμματα, καὶ δίδωσιν Ἑρμῇ. ὁ δὲ κομίζει πρὸς Ἰνὼ καὶ Ἀθάμαντα καὶ πείθει τρέφειν ὡς κόρην. ἀγανακτήσασα δὲ Ἥρα μανίαν αὐτοῖς ἐνέβαλε, καὶ Ἀθάμας μὲν τὸν πρεσβύτερον παῖδα Λέαρχον ὡς ἔλαφον θηρεύσας ἀπέκτεινεν, Ἰνὼ δὲ τὸν Μελικέρτην εἰς πεπυρωμένον λέβητα ῥίψασα, εἶτα βαστάσασα μετὰ νεκροῦ τοῦ παιδὸς ἥλατο κατὰ βυθοῦ. 1 -- καὶ Λευκοθέα μὲν αὐτὴν καλεῖται, Παλαίμων δὲ ὁ παῖς, οὕτως ὀνομασθέντες ὑπὸ τῶν πλεόντων· τοῖς χειμαζομένοις γὰρ βοηθοῦσιν. ἐτέθη δὲ ἐπὶ Μελικέρτῃ ὁ 2 -- ἀγὼν τῶν Ἰσθμίων, Σισύφου θέντος. Διόνυσον δὲ Ζεὺς εἰς ἔριφον ἀλλάξας τὸν Ἥρας θυμὸν ἔκλεψε, καὶ λαβὼν αὐτὸν Ἑρμῆς πρὸς νύμφας ἐκόμισεν ἐν Νύσῃ κατοικούσας τῆς Ἀσίας, ἃς ὕστερον Ζεὺς καταστερίσας ὠνόμασεν Ὑάδας.But Zeus loved Semele and bedded with her unknown to Hera. Now Zeus had agreed to do for her whatever she asked, and deceived by Hera she asked that he would come to her as he came when he was wooing Hera. Unable to refuse, Zeus came to her bridal chamber in a chariot, with lightnings and thunderings, and launched a thunderbolt. But Semele expired of fright, and Zeus, snatching the sixth-month abortive child from the fire, sewed it in his thigh. On the death of Semele the other daughters of Cadmus spread a report that Semele had bedded with a mortal man, and had falsely accused Zeus, and that therefore she had been blasted by thunder. But at the proper time Zeus undid the stitches and gave birth to Dionysus, and entrusted him to Hermes. And he conveyed him to Inon and Athamas, and persuaded them to rear him as a girl. But Hera indignantly drove them mad, and Athamas hunted his elder son Learchus as a deer and killed him, and Inon threw Melicertes into a boiling cauldron, then carrying it with the dead child she sprang into the deep. And she herself is called Leucothea, and the boy is called Palaemon, such being the names they get from sailors; for they succour storm-tossed mariners. And the Isthmian games were instituted by Sisyphus in honor of Melicertes. But Zeus eluded the wrath of Hera by turning Dionysus into a kid, and Hermes took him and brought him to the nymphs who dwelt at Nysa in Asia, whom Zeus afterwards changed into stars and named them the Hyades.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

40 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 117-132, 937, 942, 975-976, 116 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

116. A pleasing song and laud the company
2. Homer, Iliad, 6.130-6.137, 14.323-14.325 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 14.323. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.324. /who bare Perseus, pre-eminent above all warriors; nor of the daughter of far-famed Phoenix, that bare me Minos and godlike Rhadamanthys; nor of Semele, nor of Alcmene in Thebes, and she brought forth Heracles, her son stout of heart 14.325. /and Semele bare Dionysus, the joy of mortals; nor of Demeter, the fair-tressed queen; nor of glorious Leto; nay, nor yet of thine own self, as now I love thee, and sweet desire layeth hold of me. Then with crafty mind the queenly Hera spake unto him:
3. Homer, Odyssey, 5.333-5.335, 24.73-24.75 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Fragments, 57 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Aeschylus, Fragments, 57 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aeschylus, Fragments, 57 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 704, 592 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

592. Ἥρᾳ στυγητὸς πρὸς βίαν γυμνάζεται. Ἰώ
8. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 292-297, 556-564, 291 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

291. κλῃδοῦχον Ἥρας φασὶ δωμάτων ποτὲ 291. Is there a report that once in this land of Argos Io was ward of Hera’s house? King
9. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.25-2.30 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Pindar, Paeanes, 3.8-3.58 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 3.97-3.99, 11.1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Bacchae, 100, 1000-1001, 101-104, 11-12, 2, 242-245, 286-293, 453, 520-529, 596-599, 6, 600, 680, 7-9, 94-99, 997-999, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. αἰνῶ δὲ Κάδμον, ἄβατον ὃς πέδον τόδε 10. I praise Kadmos, who has made this place hallowed, the shrine of his daughter; and I have covered it all around with the cluster-bearing leaf of the vine.I have left the wealthy lands of the Lydians and Phrygians, the sun-parched plains of the Persians
13. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1752-1757, 1751 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1751. At least go seek the Bromian god in his untrodden sanctuary among the Maenads’ hills. Antigone
14. Herodotus, Histories, 2.146 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.146. With regard to these two, Pan and Dionysus, one may follow whatever story one thinks most credible; but I give my own opinion concerning them here. Had Dionysus son of Semele and Pan son of Penelope appeared in Hellas and lived there to old age, like Heracles the son of Amphitryon, it might have been said that they too (like Heracles) were but men, named after the older Pan and Dionysus, the gods of antiquity; ,but as it is, the Greek story has it that no sooner was Dionysus born than Zeus sewed him up in his thigh and carried him away to Nysa in Ethiopia beyond Egypt ; and as for Pan, the Greeks do not know what became of him after his birth. It is therefore plain to me that the Greeks learned the names of these two gods later than the names of all the others, and trace the birth of both to the time when they gained the knowledge.
15. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

16. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 3.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.11. quod aliis quoque multis locis reperietur; reperitur G 1 sed id alias, nunc, quod instat. totum igitur id alt. id om. H s quod quaerimus quid et quale sit, sit fit V verbi vis ipsa declarat. eos enim sanos quoniam intellegi necesse est, quorum mens motu quasi morbo perturbata nullo nulla X corr. V 1? sit, qui quia K 1 contra adfecti affecti GR 2 insani G 1 sint, hos insanos appellari necesse est. itaque nihil melius, quam quod est in consuetudine sermonis Latini, cum exisse ex potestate dicimus eos, qui ecfrenati hecfrenati G (h del. 2 ) hęc fr. V effr. R rec V rec feruntur aut libidine aut iracundia— quamquam ipsa iracundia libidinis est pars; sic enim definitur: iracundia ulciscendi libido ulciscendi libido cf. Aug. civ. 14,15 quis V 1 —; qui igitur exisse ex potestate dicimus ... 20 ex potestate om. H dicuntur, idcirco dicuntur, quia non sint in potestate mentis, cui regnum totius animi a natura tributum est. Graeci autem mani/an manian X (man in r. V 1 ) appellant X unde appellent, non facile dixerim; eam tamen ipsam ipsa KGH (ipsāR, sed vix m. 1 ) distinguimus nos melius quam illi. hanc enim insaniam, quae iuncta stultitiae stultitiae K 2 V c BGr.(?) stultitia X patet latius, nos post latius add. V c a furore disiungimus. distinguimus R Graeci volunt illi quidem, sed parum valent verbo: quem nos furorem, melagxoli/an melancholian GV -iam KRH illi vocant; quasi vero atra bili atribili V 1 K (-bi li) atra- bili GR solum mens ac non non add. R c saepe vel iracundia graviore vel timore vel timore add. G 2 vel dolore moveatur; totum . . 322, 3 moveatur H quo genere Athamantem Alcmaeonem alomeonem K 1 alc meonem V (on in r. V c ) Aiacem Orestem furere dicimus. qui ita sit adfectus, eum dominum esse rerum suarum vetant duodecim duodecem R 1 V tab. 5, 7. Ciceronis locus obversatur Horatio s. 2, 3, 217 tabulae; itaque non est scriptum si insanus, sed si furiosus insanus et fur. Non. escit Bouhier esse incipit W esset Non. escit . stultitiam stultiam V ( ss rec ) stultia K (- 2 ) stultitia GR 1 (-ă 2 ) H enim censuerunt constantia, inconstantiam KR ( etiam m a m. 1 ut. v. ) V 1 ( sed in et m exp. 1 ) H inconstantia G insaniam enim censuerunt constantiam, id est sanitatem, tamen posse tueri Non. id est sanitate, vacantem posse tamen tueri mediocritatem officiorum et vitae communem cultum atque usitatum; furorem autem autem om. Non. esse rati sunt mentis ad omnia caecitatem. quod cum maius magis R 1 esse videatur quam insania, tamen eius modi est, ut furor in sapientem cadere possit, non possit insania. itaque stultitia censuerunt ... 13 insania itaque ... 13 cadere possit, insania non Non. 443, 2 sed haec alia quaestio est; nos ad propositum revertamur.
17. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.63.3-3.63.4, 4.2.2-4.2.3, 5.52, 5.52.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.63.3.  This, then, is their account: The most ancient Dionysus was an Indian, and since his country, because of the excellent climate, produced the vine in abundance without cultivation, he was the first to press out the clusters of grapes and to devise the use of wine as a natural product, likewise to give the proper care to the figs and other fruits which grow upon trees, and, speaking generally, to devise whatever pertains to the harvesting and storing of these fruits. The same Dionysus is, furthermore, said to have worn a long beard, the reason for the report being that it is the custom among the Indians to give great care, until their death, to the raising of a beard. 3.63.4.  Now this Dionysus visited with an army all the inhabited world and gave instruction both as to the culture of the vine and the crushing of the clusters in the wine-vats (lenoi), which is the reason why the god was named Lenaeus. Likewise, he allowed all people to share in his other discoveries, and when he passed from among men he received immortal honour at the hands of those who had received his benefactions. 4.2.2.  Semelê was loved by Zeus because of her beauty, but since he had his intercourse with her secretly and without speech she thought that the god despised her; consequently she made the request of him that he come to her embraces in the same manner as in his approaches to Hera. 4.2.3.  Accordingly, Zeus visited her in a way befitting a god, accompanied by thunder and lightning, revealing himself to her as he embraced her; but Semelê, who was pregt and unable to endure the majesty of the divine presence, brought forth the babe untimely and was herself slain by the fire. Thereupon Zeus, taking up the child, handed it over to the care of Hermes, and ordered him to take it to the cave in Nysa, which lay between Phoenicia and the Nile, where he should deliver it to the nymphs that they should rear it and with great solicitude bestow upon it the best of care. 5.52. 1.  The myth which the Naxians have to relate about Dionysus is like this: He was reared, they say, in their country, and for this reason the island has been most dear to him and is called by some Dionysias.,2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.,3.  And because of the kindness which the inhabitants of Naxos had shown to Dionysus in connection with his rearing they received marks of his gratitude; for the island increased in prosperity and fitted out notable naval forces, and the Naxians were the first to withdraw from the naval forces of Xerxes and to aid in the defeat at sea which the barbarian suffered, and they participated with distinction in the battle of Plataeae. Also the wine of the island possesses an excellence which is peculiarly its own and offers proof of the friendship which the god entertains for the island. 5.52.2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.
18. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 224, 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

19. Ovid, Fasti, 6.501-6.502 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.501. And gliding smoothly carried them through their realm. 6.502. They reached the mouth of densely eddying Tiber
20. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 3.249-3.315, 4.13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Propertius, Elegies, 3.17.24 (1st cent. BCE

22. Strabo, Geography, 8.3.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.3.19. At the base of these mountains, on the seaboard, are two caves. One is the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades; the other is the scene of the stories of the daughters of Atlas and of the birth of Dardanus. And here, too, are the sacred precincts called the Ionaion and the Eurycydeium. Samicum is now only a fortress, though formerly there was also a city which was called Samos, perhaps because of its lofty situation; for they used to call lofty places Samoi. And perhaps Samicum was the acropolis of Arene, which the poet mentions in the Catalogue: And those who dwelt in Pylus and lovely Arene. For while they cannot with certainty discover Arene anywhere, they prefer to conjecture that this is its site; and the neighboring River Anigrus, formerly called Minyeius, gives no slight indication of the truth of the conjecture, for the poet says: And there is a River Minyeius which falls into the sea near Arene. For near the cave of the nymphs called Anigriades is a spring which makes the region that lies below it swampy and marshy. The greater part of the water is received by the Anigrus, a river so deep and so sluggish that it forms a marsh; and since the region is muddy, it emits an offensive odor for a distance of twenty stadia, and makes the fish unfit to eat. In the mythical accounts, however, this is attributed by some writers to the fact that certain of the Centaurs here washed off the poison they got from the Hydra, and by others to the fact that Melampus used these cleansing waters for the purification of the Proetides. The bathing-water from here cures leprosy, elephantiasis, and scabies. It is said, also, that the Alpheius was so named from its being a cure for leprosy. At any rate, since both the sluggishness of the Anigrus and the backwash from the sea give fixity rather than current to its waters, it was called the Minyeius in earlier times, so it is said, though some have perverted the name and made it Minteius instead. But the word has other sources of derivation, either from the people who went forth with Chloris, the mother of Nestor, from the Minyeian Orchomenus, or from the Minyans, who, being descendants of the Argonauts, were first driven out of Lemnos into Lacedemon, and thence into Triphylia, and took up their abode about Arene in the country which is now called Hypaesia, though it no longer has the settlements of the Minyans. Some of these Minyans sailed with Theras, the son of Autesion, who was a descendant of Polyneices, to the island which is situated between Cyrenaea and Crete (Calliste its earlier name, but Thera its later, as Callimachus says), and founded Thera, the mother-city of Cyrene, and designated the island by the same name as the city.
23. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 1.1.6, 1.9.2, 2.1.3, 2.2.2, 3.4.2, 3.4.4, 3.5.1, 3.5.3, 3.10.3, 3.13.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.9.2. Ἀθάμας δὲ ὕστερον διὰ μῆνιν Ἥρας καὶ τῶν ἐξ Ἰνοῦς ἐστερήθη παίδων· αὐτὸς μὲν γὰρ μανεὶς ἐτόξευσε Λέαρχον, Ἰνὼ δὲ Μελικέρτην μεθʼ ἑαυτῆς εἰς πέλαγος ἔρριψεν. ἐκπεσὼν δὲ τῆς Βοιωτίας ἐπυνθάνετο τοῦ θεοῦ ποῦ κατοικήσει· χρησθέντος δὲ αὐτῷ κατοικεῖν ἐν ᾧπερ ἂν τόπῳ ὑπὸ ζῴων ἀγρίων ξενισθῇ, πολλὴν χώραν διελθὼν ἐνέτυχε λύκοις προβάτων μοίρας νεμομένοις· οἱ δέ, θεωρήσαντες αὐτόν, ἃ διῃροῦντο ἀπολιπόντες ἔφυγον. Ἀθάμας δὲ κτίσας τὴν χώραν Ἀθαμαντίαν ἀφʼ ἑαυτοῦ προσηγόρευσε, καὶ γήμας Θεμιστὼ τὴν Ὑψέως ἐγέννησε Λεύκωνα Ἐρύθριον Σχοινέα Πτῶον. 2.1.3. Ἄργου δὲ καὶ Ἰσμήνης τῆς Ἀσωποῦ παῖς Ἴασος, 2 -- οὗ φασιν Ἰὼ γενέσθαι. Κάστωρ δὲ ὁ συγγράψας τὰ χρονικὰ καὶ πολλοὶ τῶν τραγικῶν Ἰνάχου τὴν Ἰὼ λέγουσιν· Ἡσίοδος δὲ καὶ Ἀκουσίλαος Πειρῆνος αὐτήν φασιν εἶναι. ταύτην ἱερωσύνην τῆς Ἥρας ἔχουσαν Ζεὺς ἔφθειρε. φωραθεὶς δὲ ὑφʼ Ἥρας τῆς μὲν κόρης ἁψάμενος εἰς βοῦν μετεμόρφωσε λευκήν, ἀπωμόσατο δὲ ταύτῃ 1 -- μὴ συνελθεῖν· διό φησιν Ἡσίοδος οὐκ ἐπισπᾶσθαι τὴν ἀπὸ τῶν θεῶν ὀργὴν τοὺς γινομένους ὅρκους ὑπὲρ ἔρωτος. Ἥρα δὲ αἰτησαμένη παρὰ Διὸς τὴν βοῦν φύλακα αὐτῆς κατέστησεν Ἄργον τὸν πανόπτην, ὃν Φερεκύδης 2 -- μὲν Ἀρέστορος λέγει, Ἀσκληπιάδης δὲ Ἰνάχου, Κέρκωψ 3 -- δὲ Ἄργου καὶ Ἰσμήνης τῆς Ἀσωποῦ θυγατρός· Ἀκουσίλαος δὲ γηγενῆ αὐτὸν λέγει. οὗτος ἐκ τῆς ἐλαίας ἐδέσμευεν αὐτὴν ἥτις ἐν τῷ Μυκηναίων ὑπῆρχεν ἄλσει. Διὸς δὲ ἐπιτάξαντος Ἑρμῇ κλέψαι τὴν βοῦν, μηνύσαντος Ἱέρακος, ἐπειδὴ λαθεῖν οὐκ ἠδύνατο, λίθῳ βαλὼν ἀπέκτεινε τὸν Ἄργον, ὅθεν ἀργειφόντης ἐκλήθη. Ἥρα δὲ τῇ βοῒ οἶστρον ἐμβάλλει ἡ δὲ πρῶτον ἧκεν εἰς τὸν ἀπʼ ἐκείνης Ἰόνιον κόλπον κληθέντα, ἔπειτα διὰ τῆς Ἰλλυρίδος πορευθεῖσα καὶ τὸν Αἷμον ὑπερβαλοῦσα διέβη τὸν τότε μὲν καλούμενον πόρον Θρᾴκιον, νῦν δὲ ἀπʼ ἐκείνης Βόσπορον. ἀπελθοῦσα 4 -- δὲ εἰς Σκυθίαν καὶ τὴν Κιμμερίδα γῆν, πολλὴν χέρσον πλανηθεῖσα καὶ πολλὴν διανηξαμένη θάλασσαν Εὐρώπης τε καὶ Ἀσίας, τελευταῖον ἧκεν 1 -- εἰς Αἴγυπτον, ὅπου τὴν ἀρχαίαν μορφὴν ἀπολαβοῦσα γεννᾷ παρὰ τῷ Νείλῳ ποταμῷ Ἔπαφον παῖδα. τοῦτον δὲ Ἥρα δεῖται Κουρήτων ἀφανῆ ποιῆσαι· οἱ δὲ ἠφάνισαν αὐτόν. καὶ Ζεὺς μὲν αἰσθόμενος κτείνει Κούρητας, Ἰὼ δὲ ἐπὶ ζήτησιν τοῦ παιδὸς ἐτράπετο. πλανωμένη δὲ κατὰ τὴν Συρίαν ἅπασαν (ἐκεῖ γὰρ ἐμηνύετο ὅτι 2 -- ἡ 3 -- τοῦ Βυβλίων βασιλέως γυνὴ 4 -- ἐτιθήνει τὸν υἱόν) καὶ τὸν Ἔπαφον εὑροῦσα, εἰς Αἴγυπτον ἐλθοῦσα ἐγαμήθη Τηλεγόνῳ τῷ βασιλεύοντι τότε Αἰγυπτίων. ἱδρύσατο δὲ ἄγαλμα Δήμητρος, ἣν ἐκάλεσαν Ἶσιν Αἰγύπτιοι, καὶ τὴν Ἰὼ Ἶσιν ὁμοίως προσηγόρευσαν. 2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.4.2. Κάδμος δὲ ἀνθʼ ὧν ἔκτεινεν ἀίδιον 3 -- ἐνιαυτὸν ἐθήτευσεν Ἄρει· ἦν δὲ ὁ ἐνιαυτὸς τότε ὀκτὼ ἔτη. μετὰ δὲ τὴν θητείαν Ἀθηνᾶ αὐτῷ τὴν βασιλείαν 4 -- κατεσκεύασε, Ζεὺς δὲ ἔδωκεν αὐτῷ γυναῖκα Ἁρμονίαν, Ἀφροδίτης καὶ Ἄρεος θυγατέρα. καὶ πάντες θεοὶ καταλιπόντες τὸν οὐρανόν, ἐν τῇ Καδμείᾳ τὸν γάμον εὐωχούμενοι καθύμνησαν. ἔδωκε δὲ αὐτῇ Κάδμος πέπλον καὶ τὸν ἡφαιστότευκτον ὅρμον, ὃν ὑπὸ Ἡφαίστου λέγουσί τινες δοθῆναι Κάδμῳ, Φερεκύδης δὲ ὑπὸ Εὐρώπης· ὃν παρὰ Διὸς αὐτὴν λαβεῖν. γίνονται δὲ Κάδμῳ θυγατέρες μὲν Αὐτονόη Ἰνὼ Σεμέλη Ἀγαυή, παῖς δὲ Πολύδωρος. Ἰνὼ μὲν οὖν Ἀθάμας ἔγημεν, Αὐτονόην δὲ Ἀρισταῖος, Ἀγαυὴν δὲ Ἐχίων. 3.4.4. Αὐτονόης δὲ καὶ Ἀρισταίου παῖς Ἀκταίων ἐγένετο, ὃς τραφεὶς παρὰ Χείρωνι κυνηγὸς ἐδιδάχθη, καὶ ἔπειτα ὕστερον 1 -- ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι κατεβρώθη ὑπὸ τῶν ἰδίων κυνῶν. καὶ τοῦτον ἐτελεύτησε τὸν τρόπον, ὡς μὲν Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, μηνίσαντος τοῦ Διὸς ὅτι ἐμνηστεύσατο Σεμέλην, ὡς δὲ οἱ πλείονες, ὅτι τὴν Ἄρτεμιν λουομένην εἶδε. καί φασι τὴν θεὸν παραχρῆμα αὐτοῦ τὴν μορφὴν εἰς ἔλαφον ἀλλάξαι, καὶ τοῖς ἑπομένοις αὐτῷ πεντήκοντα κυσὶν ἐμβαλεῖν λύσσαν, ὑφʼ ὧν κατὰ ἄγνοιαν ἐβρώθη. ἀπολομένου 2 -- δὲ Ἀκταίωνος 3 -- οἱ κύνες ἐπιζητοῦντες τὸν δεσπότην κατωρύοντο, καὶ ζήτησιν ποιούμενοι παρεγένοντο ἐπὶ τὸ τοῦ Χείρωνος ἄντρον, ὃς εἴδωλον κατεσκεύασεν Ἀκταίωνος, ὃ καὶ τὴν λύπην αὐτῶν ἔπαυσε. τὰ 4 -- ὀνόματα τῶν Ἀκταίωνος κυνῶν ἐκ τῶν οὕτω δὴ νῦν καλὸν σῶμα περισταδόν, ἠύτε θῆρος, τοῦδε δάσαντο κύνες κρατεροί. πέλας † Ἄρκενα 5 -- πρώτη. μετὰ ταύτην ἄλκιμα τέκνα, Λυγκεὺς καὶ Βαλίος 1 -- πόδας αἰνετός, ἠδʼ Ἀμάρυνθος.— καὶ τούτους ὀνομαστὶ διηνεκέως κατέλεξε· 2 -- καὶ τότε Ἀκταίων ἔθανεν Διὸς ἐννεσίῃσι. 3 -- πρῶτοι γὰρ μέλαν αἷμα πίον 4 -- σφετέροιο ἄνακτος Σπαρτός τʼ Ὤμαργός 5 -- τε Βορῆς τʼ αἰψηροκέλευθος. οὗτοι δʼ 6 --Ἀκταίου πρῶτοι φάγον αἷμα τʼ ἔλαψαν. 7 -- τοὺς δὲ μέτʼ ἄλλοι πάντες ἐπέσσυθεν 8 -- ἐμμεμαῶτες.— ἀργαλέων ὀδυνῶν ἄκος ἔμμεναι ἀνθρώποισιν . 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε. 3.5.3. βουλόμενος δὲ ἀπὸ τῆς Ἰκαρίας εἰς Νάξον διακομισθῆναι, Τυρρηνῶν λῃστρικὴν ἐμισθώσατο τριήρη. οἱ δὲ αὐτὸν ἐνθέμενοι Νάξον μὲν παρέπλεον, ἠπείγοντο δὲ εἰς τὴν Ἀσίαν ἀπεμπολήσοντες. ὁ δὲ τὸν μὲν ἱστὸν 4 -- καὶ τὰς κώπας ἐποίησεν ὄφεις, τὸ δὲ σκάφος ἔπλησε κισσοῦ καὶ βοῆς αὐλῶν· οἱ δὲ ἐμμανεῖς γενόμενοι κατὰ τῆς θαλάττης ἔφυγον καὶ ἐγένοντο δελφῖνες. ὣς δὲ 1 -- αὐτὸν θεὸν ἄνθρωποι ἐτίμων, ὁ δὲ ἀναγαγὼν ἐξ Ἅιδου τὴν μητέρα, καὶ προσαγορεύσας Θυώνην, μετʼ αὐτῆς εἰς οὐρανὸν ἀνῆλθεν. 3.10.3. Ταϋγέτη δὲ ἐκ Διὸς ἐγέννησε 1 -- Λακεδαίμονα, ἀφʼ οὗ καὶ Λακεδαίμων ἡ χώρα καλεῖται. Λακεδαίμονος δὲ καὶ Σπάρτης τῆς Εὐρώτα, ὃς ἦν ἀπὸ Λέλεγος αὐτόχθονος καὶ νύμφης νηίδος Κλεοχαρείας, Ἀμύκλας καὶ Εὐρυδίκη, ἣν ἔγημεν Ἀκρίσιος. Ἀμύκλα δὲ καὶ Διομήδης τῆς Λαπίθου Κυνόρτης καὶ Ὑάκινθος. τοῦτον εἶναι τοῦ Ἀπόλλωνος ἐρώμενον λέγουσιν, ὃν δίσκῳ βαλὼν ἄκων ἀπέκτεινε. Κυνόρτου δὲ Περιήρης, ὃς γαμεῖ Γοργοφόνην τὴν Περσέως, καθάπερ Στησίχορός φησι, καὶ τίκτει Τυνδάρεων Ἰκάριον Ἀφαρέα Λεύκιππον. Ἀφαρέως μὲν οὖν καὶ Ἀρήνης τῆς Οἰβάλου 1 -- Λυγκεύς τε καὶ Ἴδας καὶ Πεῖσος· κατὰ πολλοὺς δὲ Ἴδας ἐκ Ποσειδῶνος λέγεται. Λυγκεὺς δὲ ὀξυδερκίᾳ διήνεγκεν, ὡς καὶ τὰ ὑπὸ γῆν θεωρεῖν. Λευκίππου δὲ θυγατέρες ἐγένοντο Ἱλάειρα καὶ Φοίβη· ταύτας ἁρπάσαντες ἔγημαν Διόσκουροι. πρὸς δὲ ταύταις Ἀρσινόην ἐγέννησε. ταύτῃ μίγνυται Ἀπόλλων, ἡ δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν γεννᾷ. τινὲς δὲ Ἀσκληπιὸν οὐκ ἐξ Ἀρσινόης τῆς Λευκίππου λέγουσιν, ἀλλʼ ἐκ Κορωνίδος τῆς Φλεγύου ἐν Θεσσαλίᾳ. καί φασιν ἐρασθῆναι ταύτης Ἀπόλλωνα καὶ εὐθέως συνελθεῖν· τὴν δὲ 1 -- παρὰ τὴν τοῦ πατρὸς γνώμην ἑλομένην 2 -- Ἴσχυϊ τῷ Καινέως ἀδελφῷ συνοικεῖν. Ἀπόλλων δὲ τὸν μὲν ἀπαγγείλαντα κόρακα καταρᾶται, ὃν 3 -- τέως λευκὸν ὄντα ἐποίησε μέλανα, αὐτὴν δὲ ἀπέκτεινε. καιομένης δὲ αὐτῆς 4 -- ἁρπάσας τὸ βρέφος ἐκ τῆς πυρᾶς πρὸς Χείρωνα τὸν Κένταυρον ἤνεγκε, παρʼ ᾧ 1 -- καὶ τὴν ἰατρικὴν καὶ τὴν κυνηγετικὴν τρεφόμενος ἐδιδάχθη. καὶ γενόμενος χειρουργικὸς καὶ τὴν τέχνην ἀσκήσας ἐπὶ πολὺ οὐ μόνον ἐκώλυέ τινας ἀποθνήσκειν, ἀλλʼ ἀνήγειρε καὶ τοὺς ἀποθανόντας· παρὰ γὰρ Ἀθηνᾶς λαβὼν τὸ ἐκ τῶν φλεβῶν τῆς Γοργόνος ῥυὲν αἷμα, τῷ μὲν ἐκ τῶν ἀριστερῶν ῥυέντι πρὸς φθορὰν ἀνθρώπων ἐχρῆτο, τῷ δὲ ἐκ τῶν δεξιῶν πρὸς σωτηρίαν, καὶ διὰ τούτου 2 -- τοὺς τεθνηκότας ἀνήγειρεν. εὗρον 3 -- δέ τινας λεγομένους ἀναστῆναι ὑπʼ αὐτοῦ, Καπανέα καὶ Λυκοῦργον, ὡς Στησίχορός φησιν ἐν Ἐριφύλῃ, Ἱππόλυτον, ὡς ὁ τὰ Ναυπακτικὰ συγγράψας λέγει, Τυνδάρεων, ὥς φησι Πανύασις, 1 -- Ὑμέναιον, ὡς οἱ Ὀρφικοὶ λέγουσι, Γλαῦκον τὸν Μίνωος, ὡς Μελησαγόρας λέγε ι. 3.13.6. ὡς δὲ ἐγέννησε Θέτις ἐκ Πηλέως βρέφος, ἀθάνατον θέλουσα ποιῆσαι τοῦτο, κρύφα Πηλέως εἰς τὸ πῦρ ἐγκρύβουσα 1 -- τῆς νυκτὸς ἔφθειρεν ὃ ἦν αὐτῷ θνητὸν πατρῷον, μεθʼ ἡμέραν δὲ ἔχριεν ἀμβροσίᾳ. Πηλεὺς δὲ ἐπιτηρήσας καὶ σπαίροντα τὸν παῖδα ἰδὼν ἐπὶ τοῦ πυρὸς ἐβόησε· καὶ Θέτις κωλυθεῖσα τὴν προαίρεσιν τελειῶσαι, νήπιον τὸν παῖδα ἀπολιποῦσα πρὸς Νηρηίδας ᾤχετο. κομίζει δὲ τὸν παῖδα πρὸς Χείρωνα Πηλεύς. ὁ δὲ λαβὼν αὐτὸν ἔτρεφε σπλάγχνοις λεόντων καὶ συῶν ἀγρίων καὶ ἄρκτων μυελοῖς, καὶ ὠνόμασεν Ἀχιλλέα (πρότερον δὲ 1 -- ἦν ὄνομα αὐτῷ Λιγύρων) ὅτι τὰ χείλη μαστοῖς οὐ προσήνεγκε.
24. Plutarch, On Moral Virtue, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

441c. and a faculty engendered by reason, or rather to be itself reason which is in accord with virtue and is firm and unshaken. They also think that the passionate and irrational part of the soul is not distinguished from the rational by any difference or by its nature, but is the same part, which, indeed, they term intelligence and the governing part; it is, they say, wholly transformed and changes both during its emotional states and in the alterations brought about in accordance with an acquired disposition or condition and thus becomes both vice and virtue; it contains nothing irrational within itself, but is called irrational whenever, by the overmastering power of our impulses, which have become strong and prevail, it is hurried on to something outrageous which contravenes the convictions of reason.
25. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 418 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

26. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.37.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 41.2-41.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

28. Galen, On The Doctrines of Hippocrates And Plato, 4.5.6, 4.6.24-4.6.27, 4.7.26-4.7.27 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

29. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.25.1, 1.44.7, 2.1.3, 2.25.9, 2.26.7, 2.37.5, 5.5.10, 9.12.3-9.12.4, 9.16.7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.25.1. Such were the fates I saw befall the locusts. On the Athenian Acropolis is a statue of Pericles, the son of Xanthippus, and one of Xanthippus him self, who fought against the Persians at the naval battle of Mycale. 479 B.C. But that of Pericles stands apart, while near Xanthippus stands Anacreon of Teos, the first poet after Sappho of Lesbos to devote himself to love songs, and his posture is as it were that of a man singing when he is drunk. Deinomenes fl. 400 B.C. made the two female figures which stand near, Io, the daughter of Inachus, and Callisto, the daughter of Lycaon, of both of whom exactly the same story is told, to wit, love of Zeus, wrath of Hera, and metamorphosis, Io becoming a cow and Callisto a bear. 1.44.7. There are legends about the rocks, which rise especially at the narrow part of the road. As to the Molurian, it is said that from it Ino flung her self into the sea with Melicertes, the younger of her children. Learchus, the elder of them, had been killed by his father. One account is that Athamas did this in a fit of madness; another is that he vented on Ino and her children unbridled rage when he learned that the famine which befell the Orchomenians and the supposed death of Phrixus were not accidents from heaven, but that Ino, the step-mother, had intrigued for all these things. 2.1.3. In the Corinthian territory is also the place called Cromyon from Cromus the son of Poseidon. Here they say that Phaea was bred; overcoming this sow was one of the traditional achievements of Theseus. Farther on the pine still grew by the shore at the time of my visit, and there was an altar of Melicertes. At this place, they say, the boy was brought ashore by a dolphin; Sisyphus found him lying and gave him burial on the Isthmus, establishing the Isthmian games in his honor. 2.25.9. Going down seawards, you come to the chambers of the daughters of Proetus. On returning to the highway you will reach Medea on the left hand. They say that Electryon, the father of Alcmena, was king of Medea, but in my time nothing was left of it except the foundations. 2.26.7. The third account is, in my opinion, the farthest from the truth; it makes Asclepius to be the son of Arsinoe, the daughter of Leucippus. For when Apollophanes the Arcadian, came to Delphi and asked the god if Asclepius was the son of Arsinoe and therefore a Messenian, the Pythian priestess gave this response:— 0 Asclepius, born to bestow great joy upon mortals, Pledge of the mutual love I enjoyed with Phlegyas' daughter, Lovely Coronis, who bare thee in rugged land Epidaurus . Unknown . This oracle makes it quite certain that Asclepius was not a son of Arsinoe, and that the story was a fiction invented by Hesiod, or by one of Hesiod's interpolators, just to please the Messenians. 2.37.5. I saw also what is called the Spring of Amphiaraus and the Alcyonian Lake, through which the Argives say Dionysus went down to Hell to bring up Semele, adding that the descent here was shown him by Palymnus. There is no limit to the depth of the Alcyonian Lake, and I know of nobody who by any contrivance has been able to reach the bottom of it since not even Nero, who had ropes made several stades long and fastened them together, tying lead to them, and omitting nothing that might help his experiment, was able to discover any limit to its depth. 5.5.10. others that Pylenor, another Centaur, when shot by Heracles fled wounded to this river and washed his hurt in it, and that it was the hydra's poison which gave the Anigrus its nasty smell. Others again attribute the quality of the river to Melampus the son of Amythaon, who threw into it the means he used to purify the daughters of Proetus. 9.12.3. The Thebans assert that on the part of their citadel, where to-day stands their market-place, was in ancient times the house of Cadmus. They point out the ruins of the bridal-chamber of Harmonia, and of one which they say was Semele's into the latter they allow no man to step even now. Those Greeks who allow that the Muses sang at the wedding of Harmonia, can point to the spot in the market-place where it is said that the goddesses sang. 9.12.4. There is also a story that along with the thunderbolt hurled at the bridalchamber of Semele there fell a log from heaven. They say that Polydorus adorned this log with bronze and called it Dionysus Cadmus. Near is an image of Dionysus; Onasimedes made it of solid bronze. The altar was built by the sons of Praxiteles. 9.16.7. There are also ruins of the house of Lycus, and the tomb of Semele, but Alcmena has no tomb. It is said that on her death she was turned from human form to a stone, but the Theban account does not agree with the Megarian. The Greek legends generally have for the most part different versions. Here too at Thebes are the tombs of the children of Amphion. The boys lie apart; the girls are buried by themselves.
30. Sextus Empiricus, Against Those In The Disciplines, 7.247 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

31. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.118, 7.126 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.118. Again, the good are genuinely in earnest and vigilant for their own improvement, using a manner of life which banishes evil out of sight and makes what good there is in things appear. At the same time they are free from pretence; for they have stripped off all pretence or make-up whether in voice or in look. Free too are they from all business cares, declining to do anything which conflicts with duty. They will take wine, but not get drunk. Nay more, they will not be liable to madness either; not but what there will at times occur to the good man strange impressions due to melancholy or delirium, ideas not determined by the principle of what is choiceworthy but contrary to nature. Nor indeed will the wise man ever feel grief; seeing that grief is irrational contraction of the soul, as Apollodorus says in his Ethics. 7.126. For if a man be possessed of virtue, he is at once able to discover and to put into practice what he ought to do. Now such rules of conduct comprise rules for choosing, enduring, staying, and distributing; so that if a man does some things by intelligent choice, some things with fortitude, some things by way of just distribution, and some steadily, he is at once wise, courageous, just, and temperate. And each of the virtues has a particular subject with which it deals, as, for instance, courage is concerned with things that must be endured, practical wisdom with acts to be done, acts from which one must abstain, and those which fall under neither head. Similarly each of the other virtues is concerned with its own proper sphere. To wisdom are subordinate good counsel and understanding; to temperance, good discipline and orderliness; to justice, equality and fair-mindedness; to courage, constancy and vigour.
32. Firmicus Maternus Julius., De Errore Profanarum Religionum, 6.5 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

33. Origen, Against Celsus, 8.51 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.51. In the next place, he expresses his approval of those who hope that eternal life shall be enjoyed with God by the soul or mind, or, as it is variously called, the spiritual nature, the reasonable soul, intelligent, holy, and blessed; and he allows the soundness of the doctrine, that those who had a good life shall be happy, and the unrighteous shall suffer eternal punishments. And yet I wonder at what follows, more than at anything that Celsus has ever said; for he adds, And from this doctrine let not them or any one ever swerve. For certainly in writing against Christians, the very essence of whose faith is God, and the promises made by Christ to the righteous, and His warnings of punishment awaiting the wicked, he must see that, if a Christian were brought to renounce Christianity by his arguments against it, it is beyond doubt that, along with his Christian faith, he would cast off the very doctrine from which he says that no Christian and no man should ever swerve. But I think Celsus has been far surpassed in consideration for his fellow-men by Chrysippus in his treatise, On the Subjugation of the Passions. For when he sought to apply remedies to the affections and passions which oppress and distract the human spirit, after employing such arguments as seemed to himself to be strong, he did not shrink from using in the second and third place others which he did not himself approve of. For, says he, if it were held by any one that there are three kinds of good, we must seek to regulate the passions in accordance with that supposition; and we must not too curiously inquire into the opinions held by a person at the time that he is under the influence of passion, lest, if we delay too long for the purpose of overthrowing the opinions by which the mind is possessed, the opportunity for curing the passion may pass away. And he adds, Thus, supposing that pleasure were the highest good, or that he was of that opinion whose mind was under the dominion of passion, we should not the less give him help, and show that, even on the principle that pleasure is the highest and final good of man, all passion is disallowed. And Celsus, in like manner, after having embraced the doctrine, that the righteous shall be blessed, and the wicked shall suffer eternal punishments, should have followed out his subject; and, after having advanced what seemed to him the chief argument, he should have proceeded to prove and enforce by further reasons the truth that the unjust shall surely suffer eternal punishment, and those who lead a good life shall be blessed.
34. Philostratus, Pictures, 1.14 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

35. Bacchylides, Odes, 11.48-11.49, 11.95-11.96, 11.106-11.109

36. Epigraphy, Seg, 15.195

37. Epigraphy, Ig Iii3 Appendix, 100

38. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 327, 325

39. Papyri, P.Oxy., 2164

40. Stobaeus, Eclogues, None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adomėnas, mantas Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
agave Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
agon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
aktaion Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
alexander of aphrodisias Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
alkmene Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266
ancestrality Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
anger Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 269, 279
antagonism Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269, 279
antigone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
aphrodite Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
apotheosis Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
arcadia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
argos, argive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
argos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
ariadne, and dionysos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
artemis Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
asclepiades Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
asclepius de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
athamantas Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
athamas Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
athena, birth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
athena Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
attica, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
autonoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
beauty Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
becker, lawrence Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
beroë Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
bosporan kingdom, olbia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
boundaries, crossing of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
brehch, α. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
catalogue of zeuss partners Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266
catasterismic myth Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 142
childbirth, divine Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
children, and moral responsibility Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
chiron de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
cholos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
choreia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
chrysippus, on insanity Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
chthonic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
cicero, on species-level classification Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
classical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
cleide Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
cole, susan g. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
coronis Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 132
cult, of ino Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
dance, dancing Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
demeter, chthonic god Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 290
destruction, decay Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
detienne, μ. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
dionysos, and ariadne Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
dionysos, and gender Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
dionysos, and heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109, 120, 124
dionysos, and ino Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
dionysos, andsemele Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
dionysos, birth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266, 269
dionysos, childhood Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
dionysos, dionysos as goat Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
dionysos, dionysos erikryptos/kryptos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
dionysos, dionysos eriphos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
dionysos, eiraphiotes Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 132
dionysos, probation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9, 15, 132; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 266, 269, 279
dionysos (bacchus, god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
dionysus, birth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus, heart de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
dionysus Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
dismemberment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
dodds, e. r. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
drimios Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
dying and rising (or death and resurrection) Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 202
earth Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
edmonds iii, radcliffe g. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
eleusis, eleusinian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
emotions, examples of Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
emotions, modern theories Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
epicurus, on insanity Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
eriphos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266
eros Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
eumelos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
eupatheiai, classified by species Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
euripides, on ino in medea Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 290
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
farnell Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
female, gods Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
female, power of Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
festival, festivity, festive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
festivals, lenaia Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
fluttering (ptoia) Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
fontenrose, j. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
françois vase Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
funeral/funerary Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 202
gaia Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
gallini, c Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
gender, and dionysos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
gender, and immortality Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
gender, transgression of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
gestation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266, 269
gill, christopher Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
goat, dionysos as Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
goat Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
goats Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266
gods and goddesses, chthonian Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
gods and goddesses, olympian/chthonian binary concepts Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
gods and goddesses, olympian Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
graf, fritz Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
great goddess Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
growth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
hades (god) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
hades place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
harmonia Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
heifer Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
hekate, invoked Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 290
hellenistic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9, 15
henrichs, α. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
hephaestus Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
hephaistos, birth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
hephaistos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
hera, angry Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 266, 269, 279
hera Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9, 15, 132; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120; Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
herakles, birth Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
heraklitos Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
hermes, chthonios Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 290
hermes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132; Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
heroines, and dionysos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109, 120, 124
heroines, and lamentation Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
heroines, names of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
heroines, rescue of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
hesiod Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
historiae fabulares Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 69
homer Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 202
homeric scholia Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 69
hyakinthos, cult of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
immortality, and gender Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
impiety Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
infidelity Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
initiate Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
initiates de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
initiation, initiatory rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
initiation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
ino-leukothea, and immortality Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
ino-leukothea, cult of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
ino-leukothea, dionysos and Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
ino-leukothea Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109, 120
ino Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279; Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
intertextuality Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 69
io Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 269, 279
iphinoe, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
iphinoe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
italy, italic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
jameson, μ. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
jealousy Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 269, 279
johnston, sarah iles Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
kadmos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
kallisto Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
kern, ο. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
keune Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
kid Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
kithairon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
kykeon κυκεών Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
lamentation, and heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
learchos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
lesbos/lesbian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
life, living, mythological view of Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
life de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
lightning Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
lightning strike Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 266, 269
lykourgos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
macedonia, macedonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9, 15
mania Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
marriage Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
maternity, ambivalence toward Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
melampus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
melikertes-palaimon Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 202
melikertes Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
metamorphosis Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
milk Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
mother, maternal, in mythology Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
mountains Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
musaeus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
music, musical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
mycenaean Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9
mysteries, mystery cults, bacchic, dionysiac Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 15, 132
myth de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
names, of heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
naxos Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
nebris νεβρίς Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
nekysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
nereids Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
nurse Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 269, 279; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
nymphs Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
nysa Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
olympian family Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266
olympus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orpheus, literary author de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orphic, see titans, zagreus de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
orphic tradition, bacchic gold tablets Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
orphic tradition Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
orphism Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
ouranos Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
pandora Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122
pausanias Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 202
peleus Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
pelinna Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
pentheus Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
persephone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132; Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 290
philia Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
phronesis (good sense or prudence) Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
pindar Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 202
pluto Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 290
poetry, stoic influence in roman Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
poetry de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
proetids, daughters of proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 15
proetids Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 279
proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 279
prudence (phronesis) Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
punishment, divine Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
reaching (orexis) Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
religion/theology, olympian/chthonian binary concepts Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
rescue, of heroines Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
resemblances, semele/hydrophoroi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
resemblances, theban tetralogy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
resemblances, xantriae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
revenge Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269
rhodes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 15, 132
rites, initiation Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
rome, roman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
sacrilege Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
samothrace/samothracian Jeong, Pauline Baptism among the Mysteries: Ritual Messages and the Promise of Initiation (2023) 202
sea, as means of escape or punishment Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
seaford, richard Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
secret Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266, 279
segal, c. p. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
semele, and dionysos Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
semele, apotheosis of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
semele, death Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9
semele, name of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
semele, rescue of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
semele Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 266, 269, 279; Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
sex, between mortals and gods Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
sicyon, sicyonian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
skin Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
sophocles, inachus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
sophocles Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
sources of the bibliotheca Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 69, 142
speech de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
stepmothers Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 124
subscriptio Pamias, Apollodoriana: Ancient Myths, New Crossroads (2017) 69
subterfuge Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 269
tethys Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 290
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9, 15
thebes Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 269; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
thessaly, thessalian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
thetis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132; Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 279
thiasos θίασος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9
thracia, thracian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
thunder/thunderbolt Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77
thurii Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
thyiads Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
thyone Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120
tiryns Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 15
titans (gods) Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
tombs Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
transgression, of gender Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 109
triad Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
trick Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237, 269
vases, attic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
versnel, hendrik s. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
virtue, four cardinal virtues Graver, Stoicism and Emotion (2007) 241
wildberg, c. Eidinow and Kindt, The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Greek Religion (2015) 363
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 9, 15
womb Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 266; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
worship' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 132
worship Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7
zeus, infidelities Pirenne-Delforge and Pironti, The Hera of Zeus: Intimate Enemy, Ultimate Spouse (2022) 237
zeus, zeus lightning de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128
zeus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 7, 9, 132; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 120; Trott, Aristotle on the Matter of Form: ? Feminist Metaphysics of Generation (2019) 122; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 77; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 128